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What colour is the bear

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  • User profile image
    Ping

    A bear dropped into a hole from v=0 m/s at start, 2 seconds later, it landed on the bottom, the hole is 20 m, if the air resistant does not count, what colour is the bear? (useful formula S=Ut+½at²)

  • User profile image
    Red5

    Ping wrote:
    A bear dropped into a hole from v=0 m/s at start, 2 seconds later, it landed on the bottom, the hole is 20 m, if the air resistant does not count, what colour is the bear? (useful formula S=U+½at²)


    More importantly, if no one is there to hear the bear hit the bottom, does he make a sound?

  • User profile image
    BryanF

    Ping wrote:
    A bear dropped into a hole from v=0 m/s at start, 2 seconds later, it landed on the bottom, the hole is 20 m, if the air resistant does not count, what colour is the bear? (useful formula S=U+½at²)
    Err... the same color he was when he was dropped (assuming he didn't land in some dye or other staining substance)? Or is that too obvious?

  • User profile image
    Ping

    assuming there isn't any dye, oh yes, and the time sound takes to travel doesn't count.  It's proper physics question.Tongue Out

  • User profile image
    jsampsonPC

    Ping wrote:
    A bear dropped into a hole from v=0 m/s at start, 2 seconds later, it landed on the bottom, the hole is 20 m, if the air resistant does not count, what colour is the bear? (useful formula S=U+½at²)


    Either Red, for the blood flowing from his 20m drop....Black, for the dim nature of the pit, where little to no light can enter, or his original colour Smiley

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Black, it's in a hole, so there's no light for it to reflect, and hence has no colour.

  • User profile image
    jsampsonPC

    I guess if you want a TRUE answer...

    bear.coat.color != "bright pink";

    There...there's a correct answer Smiley

  • User profile image
    PaoloM

    blowdart wrote:
    Black, it's in a hole, so there's no light for it to reflect, and hence has no colour.

    That is if you assume that colour is not an intrinsic property of an object.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    PaoloM wrote:
    
    blowdart wrote:Black, it's in a hole, so there's no light for it to reflect, and hence has no colour.

    That is if you assume that colour is not an intrinsic property of an object.


    DataSet.Colour?

    Nope, not there.

    Tongue Out

  • User profile image
    jsampsonPC

    PaoloM wrote:
    
    blowdart wrote:Black, it's in a hole, so there's no light for it to reflect, and hence has no colour.

    That is if you assume that colour is not an intrinsic property of an object.


    Ah, then I ask you - what colour is a polar bear Wink Wait! Is this bear that dropped into the hole a polar bear? Smiley

  • User profile image
    Angus

    jsampsonPC wrote:
    
    PaoloM wrote:
    blowdart wrote:Black, it's in a hole, so there's no light for it to reflect, and hence has no colour.

    That is if you assume that colour is not an intrinsic property of an object.


    Ah, then I ask you - what colour is a polar bear Wait! Is this bear that dropped into the hole a polar bear?


    Don't they have transparent, drinking-straw like fur?

    Angus Higgins

  • User profile image
    jsampsonPC

    Angus wrote:
    Don't they have transparent, drinking-straw like fur?

    Angus Higgins


    For the most part Smiley They, like other arctic animals reflect the colours around them. Therefore, they have no color that is specific to themselves, but instead depend on their environment to reflect itself on them.

  • User profile image
    Ping

    Hee hee hee... the true answer is....White

    U=0m/s, S=20m/s t=2s  put them into the formula..

    20=0+½2²a

    a=10m/s²


    the accelleration of gravity (g) becomes larger from equator to the pole, because the earth is not really round. so the bear must be in either of the poles. Since there's no bear in South pole, so the bear must be in the north!! and the only bears that live in north pole is----White!!!!


    Have you got it right?Wink

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Ping wrote:

    Have you got it right?


    Actually it's too cold on the pole for polar bears to survive, nor is there any foor for them as they couldn't break through the ice to access it. Whilst they live in the artic region, it's near the edge of the ice flows, not in or around the pole itself.

    So the bear would have to have been flown in especially for the experiment, assuming the pole itself has your stated gravity. Which means it could be any bear.

    Big Smile

  • User profile image
    Jason Cox

    This is simple, the Bear is 50m long, it wont fit a hole 20m wide. The Bear would be the same color it was when you tried to push it in, and the color would be dependent on wether you found the Bear in the artic, desert, woodlands, etc.

    (refering to the Tu-95 Bear Bomber)

  • User profile image
    jsampsonPC

    Actually, Ping, you're not exactly correct there Smiley Polar Bears aren't always white, as we briefly alluded to a couple posts back Smiley You missed the Season variable....when did this take place? Chances are, the bear is dark yellow, and not white Smiley

  • User profile image
    Angus

    Isn't the acceleration due to gravity at the North Pole approximately 9.832m/s² not 10m/s² anyway?

    Angus Higgins

  • User profile image
    jsampsonPC

    Angus wrote:
    Isn't the acceleration due to gravity at the North Pole approximately 9.832m/s² not 10m/s² anyway?

    Angus Higgins


    For a bear, dropping 20meters....does that difference really matter? Smiley

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