Coffeehouse Thread

28 posts

Forum Read Only

This forum has been made read only by the site admins. No new threads or comments can be added.

Does persistence pay off when getting a job with Microsoft?

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    rjdohnert

    For three years I have been trying to get a job at MS, I put in for any job I am interested in at Microsoft and some I was not so interested in.  I have been interviewed one time.  So to all the softies here, How long did it take you to get on with MS?  I know I wont get on the Windows development team right away, Im willing to start on the bottom and work my way up.  I may actually camp out on Campus until you guys give me a job, and in Seattle that could be a very wet situation.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    I think persistence wouldn't help, but passion would, there's a difference between the two.

    It helps the best if you've got something they want, i.e. they want you more than you want them. Like a particular skill-set (hence why they're always eager for more CS doctorates), otherwise they'll just poach someone from inside.

    Developing good relationships with those inside also helps, especially when that person is high up, say... a product manager, since they're in charge of hiring for their team. If you're really good, you can bag an "Advocated" position, which (according to Sabot) means you can forgoe the initial interview and get right in there[1].

    [1]I haven't verified this claim though.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    DELETED: Dupe

  • User profile image
    petknep_home

    I interviewed twice for interning, turned down both times. Got some industry experience doing real win32 work then applied for a full time and got it.

    My tips: Know how COM works, be able to debug it, understand how to make objects script accessible, etc. Be able to write apps w/ GDI calls.

    Maybe it goes without saying, but it really helps if you work on a product similar to an MS product and then apply to work on that specific product.

    My advice is for a dev. I don't know anything about getting hired in test or PM. I don't know anyone who was ever turned down for the test or PM positions which is weird when I think about it. I do know lots of people who were not given dev positions.

    There's also the orange badge route which I'm not even close to an expert on. Supposedly contractors make a wage equitable to full time, with some extra to cover the absence of full time benefits. You do get the temporary ban hammer after a year if you don't get hired. I don't know the conversion rate, but I hear it's low.

  • User profile image
    jsrfc58

    petknep_home wrote:
    I interviewed twice for interning, turned down both times. Got some industry experience doing real win32 work then applied for a full time and got it.

    My tips: Know how COM works, be able to debug it, understand how to make objects script accessible, etc. Be able to write apps w/ GDI calls.
    I applied a handful of times to your organization...never got an interview, though. I know some technologies cold, however, but unfortunately, they are not Microsoft related. It's not that I couldn't learn how COM works on a deep level, and do all the things you list, but for some weird reason I get the feeling that all the effort I would put into learning such technologies would just be a waste of time because I didn't know anybody on the inside.  The sheer volume of resumes pouring in just doesn't help. Plus, it would be my experience to be interviewed and get asked obscure questions that I probably would not have an answer to...and yes you could say it is the "thinking process" that really counts, but I'm sure there would be enough other candidates out there that would know the answer, and therefore I would get knocked out. Although I'm very good at thinking out of the box, fwiw.

  • User profile image
    Human​Compiler

    For me it took persistence.  I knew since high school that Microsoft was the place for me.  I started by learning about different technologies (not just Microsoft).  I became active in different forums (some MS, some not).  I became an MVP 4 years ago and kept up my community activities, sharpening my skills, etc over that time period.  This also helped me get some great connections with people inside and outside, but related to Microsoft.  I interviewed 3 times over about 2 and a half years.  Looking back, they were all really great experiences.  I'm glad I didn't get hired for the first two jobs I interviewed for.  I like this one much better.  Wink

    Funny that you mention hanging around here to get a job.  I hear there are a lot more locals hired than from other areas of the US and other countries.  I think it's something like 70%/30%, but don't quote me.  I was originally from Indiana.

  • User profile image
    SubratamB

    The key here is ... "be yourself" .. and have fun in what you are doing...Interesting that I match quite a bit like Erik... I had started helping around in different forums worldwide... and had real satisfaction in that. I became mvp in 2005 and then in 2006... which really helped me to grow as a person and in knowledge, and came to know more smart people around.
    But... this place is really fun and I was called for interview here and I was bowled over by the people here. And now being part of them I just find what I thought when I was givin my interview was right... and that is .. Passion , positive attitude and finally.. be yourself and do not pretend.

  • User profile image
    Charles

    When would persistence not make sense when trying to accomplish something that's non-trivial?

    C

  • User profile image
    LaBomba

    Oh boy, like taking a hint...

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Charles wrote:
    When would persistence not make sense when trying to accomplish something that's non-trivial?

    C


    When on balance the thing you are trying to accomplish isn't actually worth the effort?

    [6]

  • User profile image
    Charles

    blowdart wrote:
    
    Charles wrote: When would persistence not make sense when trying to accomplish something that's non-trivial?

    C


    When on balance the thing you are trying to accomplish isn't actually worth the effort?




    That's a reasonable answer. When else?

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Charles wrote:
    
    blowdart wrote:
    Charles wrote: When would persistence not make sense when trying to accomplish something that's non-trivial?

    C


    When on balance the thing you are trying to accomplish isn't actually worth the effort?




    That's a reasonable answer. When else?


    When you're a child and your idea of presistance is "But I need it" repeated every minute.

    There is a point where the results of persistance just sour the whole experience for you; well it did for me anyway.

  • User profile image
    jsrfc58

    blowdart wrote:
    
    Charles wrote: 
    blowdart wrote: 
    Charles wrote: When would persistence not make sense when trying to accomplish something that's non-trivial?

    C


    When on balance the thing you are trying to accomplish isn't actually worth the effort?




    That's a reasonable answer. When else?


    When you're a child and your idea of presistance is "But I need it" repeated every minute.

    There is a point where the results of persistance just sour the whole experience for you; well it did for me anyway.
    There are also other things in life that are a little bit more important than your "job" (family, kids, etc.).

    It's kind of like when I got through a C Primer book, and then went and picked up a Unix book and sort of said "gee, that's it? This isn't difficult." In some ways, I think a lot of dev jobs at Microsoft aren't actually that difficult once you really dig into them, and have access to appropriate study materials (at least not for me). The question really then becomes, are you, as an organization willing to spend the time teaching somebody or do you want "instant rock stars" to only apply? That seems to be the mode that your company is in right now (maybe I'm wrong). Plus, I don't believe in "sacrificing everything" just for the sake of a career at this company. That's just plain unrealistic, and if and when you guys ever have layoffs, you'll know what I mean. That sort of attitude is great for young salespeople, but in the end it makes for hollow personalities.

  • User profile image
    kriskdf

    I came in as a contractor.  I tried to make it clear that they wanted me permanently, and they did.

    I tried getting internships, applying through Monster, applying through the www.microsoft.com/careers site, and never even got a single call back. 

    Be persistant, but not spammy.  Continue learning technologies that Microsoft wants people to know, but don't over-focus on it.  Having solid coding, debugging, and communication skills will qualify you for a lot of jobs at MS.  I don't (and won't) have a deep understanding of COM and I'm doing quite well as a dev.  Having a deep understanding will help you get a specific job that requires it.

    It helps to know someone at MS who can say positive things about your work.

  • User profile image
    BlackTiger

    When I was young (and stupid) I had same desire to work in MS...

    Later I met with different people...

    Now I don't want to work INSIDE MS.

    There is no place for developers. This is pure marketing company. With goo looking outlook and rotten inside. Like peaches in supermarkets. Smiley
    There is too much "managers" (everyone is manager!).

    Don't be stupid. If you wish to develop  - stay away from MS.

    PS: People whos manufacturing cars very often has no driving license...

    PPS: All developers are in India and China. Bcoz they are cheap and there is alot of "developers", literally.

    If you stumbled and fell down, it doesn't mean yet, that you're going in the wrong direction.
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    Xaero_​Vincent

    I think one of the niners here left his cell phone number in his profile and one day was called up by Microsoft for a job offering. Try it. You never know!

    Plus...

    If you're passionate Microsoft envanglist and know enough about technology, especially .NET, then you might have be a good job candidate.

    Keep your eyes peeled at every opportunity.


    Regards,
    Vincent


  • User profile image
    corona_coder

    To get a job at Microsoft you have to have certain qualifications.  Be ignorant of your competitors products lie about them and try to sound like you know what you are talking about.  Hate Linux, Mac OS and Google.  You should fit rifght in rj.

  • User profile image
    Mark Brown

    Persistence pays off. Don't give up. Keep doing great work. Get into the community where you live locally. Do you know who your local Microsoft people are? MCS, DPE other technical roles that live in your area? Do you know who runs your local INETA or other user groups? Find out. Sign up for any local Microsoft or other community events. Try to contribute locally as well to these things. Work on raising your profile. Become an expert in the product that you want to work on and become an MVP. All these things can make a difference. As some others here have commented Microsoft gets an incredible number of resumes. You stand a much better chance if you can get recognized by someone on the inside first and then offer your intentions rather than going the traditional route.

    Just so you know I spent 4 years trying to get the job I really wanted here and I was already working here!!!

    Hope that helps Smiley

Conversation locked

This conversation has been locked by the site admins. No new comments can be made.