Coffeehouse Thread

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Why not keep the name Longhorn?

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  • User profile image
    Sabot

    I know its usual practice for Microsoft to give it's working titles 'code names'.

    "Longhorn" is the name of the new operating system, at a later date it will be renamed "Windows 2006" or something like that when it's closer to release.

    Tagging the year onto the operating systems title shows progression and makes the upgrade path clear, but ... and here comes the point of the post guys ... why change it this time?????

    We are all getting used to calling this operating system edition, "Longhorn", so lets suggest to the marketing boys that they include it into the title this time!

    Windows Longhorn 2006 ... sounds cool to me!

    Helps us techie guys remember whats going into "Longhorn" and whats going into "Jupiter".

    Hey good idea? Let the debate commence ...

  • User profile image
    Jeremy W

    Yeah, can't wait for my boss's questions on why it's called "Windows Longhorn". I (honestly) get enough of "why's it called Windows" without adding the codenames into the mix Wink

  • User profile image
    Gill Bates

    Wasn't NT a code name? My understanding was that NT stood for N10, and N10 was the test suite. Then marketing re-worked the meaning of NT to stand for New Technology. Maybe that's just folklore.

  • User profile image
    Manip

    They did it with X-Box...

  • User profile image
    Shining Arcanine

    Sabot wrote:
    I know its usual practice for Microsoft to give it's working titles 'code names'.

    "Longhorn" is the name of the new operating system, at a later date it will be renamed "Windows 2006" or something like that when it's closer to release.

    Tagging the year onto the operating systems title shows progression and makes the upgrade path clear, but ... and here comes the point of the post guys ... why change it this time?????

    We are all getting used to calling this operating system edition, "Longhorn", so lets suggest to the marketing boys that they include it into the title this time!

    Windows Longhorn 2006 ... sounds cool to me!

    Helps us techie guys remember whats going into "Longhorn" and whats going into "Jupiter".

    Hey good idea? Let the debate commence ...


    For the same reason they changed Whistler to XP and .NET to 2003.


    Gill Bates wrote:
    Wasn't NT a code name? My understanding was that NT stood for N10, and N10 was the test suite. Then marketing re-worked the meaning of NT to stand for New Technology. Maybe that's just folklore.


    NT wasn't a code name, it is the operating system's true name.

    Windows 2000 is Windows NT 5.0
    Windows XP is Windows NT 5.1
    Windows 2003 is Windows NT 5.2
    Windows codenamed "Longhorn" should be Windows NT 6.0

  • User profile image
    miseldine

    Doesn't NT stand for New Technology?

    I think adding a date to the OS makes it seem older than it really is. XP still sounds quite fresh. "Windows 2001" would feel older and more backward to me.

  • User profile image
    Jeremy W

    I'll only correct the last line. Longhorn won't be NT 6.0, because (as I understand it) the NT core is gone, kaputzki. Though, with some of the WinFS changes that may no longer stand.

    Again, this is totally outsider perspective, so take it with a bag of salt.

  • User profile image
    Shining Arcanine

    miseldine wrote:

    Doesn't NT stand for New Technology?

    I think adding a date to the OS makes it seem older than it really is. XP still sounds quite fresh. "Windows 2001" would feel older and more backward to me.



    I'd have to check an article that interviewed 3 MS employees but I believe it stood for NT. Not Networking, not New Technology, not anything but NT.

    Jeremy W. wrote:
    I'll only correct the last line. Longhorn won't be NT 6.0, because (as I understand it) the NT core is gone, kaputzki. Though, with some of the WinFS changes that may no longer stand.

    Again, this is totally outsider perspective, so take it with a bag of salt.


    It may have been remodeled but it (understatement) builds on what was done previously so it should still be NT, I'm sure that the version number can confirm that.

  • User profile image
    miseldine

    My UNIX teacher at Uni insisted it stood for Novell Technology.

    He was a bitter, bitter man when it came to MS Smiley

  • User profile image
    Knute

    miseldine wrote:
    My UNIX teacher at Uni insisted it stood for Novell Technology.

    He was a bitter, bitter man when it came to MS Smiley


    One to many l's there my friend, it's "Novel Technology" Wink

    Besides I hate Novell they bought my consulting co and dropped their MS division Tongue Out

    ~ Knute

  • User profile image
    fagiano

    Yep, I like the idea of "Windows Longhorn 2006', at least will not give any material to the office dullard to come out with some explenation to achronims like XP or NT.
    I also hope that some MS dude will explain what NT and XP stand for... I'd like to sleep again.

  • User profile image
    lars

    How about "Windows Longhorn" for Pro, and "Windows Shorthorn" for the home edition? Smiley

    /Lars.

  • User profile image
    fagiano

    It would probably lead to stuff like "my horn is longer than yours".

  • User profile image
    Lora

    Using "Longhorn" is an interesting idea. My guess is that it will appeal more to people who already know what Longhorn is than to people who have yet to learn about it because the branding for "Windows" is stronger than the branding for "Longhorn" in non-tech oriented circles.

    If Microsoft ran a random sample survey, people would probably associate "Windows" with something to do with their computer (though the majority probably could not narrow it down to operating system versus productivity software). Longhorn would be even more meaningless to people. My guess is that you'd also find that people do not know if they have Windows 95, 98, 98SE, NT 4.0, 2000, or XP installed on their systems. Windows XP Media Center or XP Tablet PC Edition may be an exception because the adopters are more knowledgeable and biased toward new technology.

    Establishing a strong brand is difficult. It is an investment and takes time and a tremendous amount of effort. Getting rid of a brand is just as difficult -- and even combining "Windows Longhorn" would take a strong image of "Longhorn" to counterbalance that immediate image of longhorn cattle that non-tech users will think of. We don't want images of a bull longhorn cattle spearing a penguin now, do we? Can you think of a plan that would stop any of that from happening?

    My guess is that a year or an even more meaningless tag to Windows would be able to spread more rapidly. Anyone have any data to demonstrate this? (Think of Intel Centrino Technology, a totally made up word, but it had strong, successful branding. Maybe something like this would work. Avoid "Media", it's way over used.)

    An advantage to a year tag is that someone who has Windows 95 might just realize that they have a 9 or 10 year old operating system when they read "2006" Big Smile

  • User profile image
    jamie

    er.. because it sounds...SILLY.

    They should just call it Windows.

    Windows Real Estate Edition 1.0
    Windows Developer Edition 1.0
    Windows New User Edition 1.0
    etc

    no more ME  or Xp silly letters..

    ..if anything go back to numbers

    Windows 6

    * then slashdot could call it Windows 666 Wink

  • User profile image
    fagiano

    I agree with Lora about having '2006' and 'Windows' in the name, however adding some other stuff like 'longhorn' will give the feeling that is not just an unpdate but something really new.

    BTW centrino in italian means "small centre", is also a kind of towel you put under the flowers in the centre of a teble.
    For an italian sounds weak and wierd.

  • User profile image
    Charles

    Jeremy W. wrote:
    ...the NT core is gone, kaputzki.


    What makes you think this? NT is the core part of Longhorn. Remember, you can think of NT as being the easily-remembered identifier for our Macro kernel (or Monolithic kernel).

    Keep on posting,

    Charles

  • User profile image
    jpondy

    Back in the day when Novell Netware ruled the world Mr. Bill looked out and saw that this was bad and said "We shall build an OS that will Terminate Netware and it shall be called Windows NT for Netware Terminator".

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