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Salary Raises

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  • User profile image
    themaffeo

    I’m in the process of leaving my current job for a better one – better in both pay and technology used.  When I told my bosses that one of the reasons for my leaving was salary, they each (separately) told me something to the effect of “You should have told us you were that unhappy.  If we had known you were serious we would have offered you more – btw, is it to late to match your new salary?”  Of course, by this time it's to late. This brings me to a quandary.

     

    I’ve always been afraid to stride into my boss’s office and point blank tell them I would like a raise.  My fear is that the manager would take that as a negative and might begin to look for someone to replace me.  I also don’t feel comfortable ‘bluffing’ my bosses about job offers to gain salary increases - aside from the honesty aspect, its just plain dangerous. 

     

    What has everyone else’s experiences been with asking for raises?  Does it ever result in being let go? Does it ever work?  If any managers read this, how do you respond to a worker asking for additional compensation?

     

     

    Thanks.

  • User profile image
    forgey

    My take on this is that if at review time your boss is only taking into consideration how much he has to give you to keep you there then you don't want to work there. Your boss should be looking at your performance for the year and compare that against what you both agreed upon in your previous review and if you met your objectives or exceeded them then he should base his decision on that. If he is willing to match your new salary now why wasn't he willing to give you that money at review time?

    I don't feel I should have to stride into my bosses office and have a stressful conversation about raises/compensation. You should both have an idea of what you feel is a fair amount and you should feel open about having a conversation with him about that at review time. If he thinks your number is too high he should be willing to outline why he feels his number is more appropriate and what you would need to do to be able to earn the number that you have in mind. You might not be happy with the outcome, but at least you will know where you stand. To go along with that, his tune shouldn't change when you walk in to tell him you are moving on for more money. If he truely felt your number was too high at review time then the fact that someone else was willing to pay you that much shouldn't change his mind.

    To go along with that, maybe he agrees with you that your number is appropriate, but just can't afford it.

    forgey

  • User profile image
    risu

    I don't know if this is really going to help you or not but here goes.

    I've always been of the mindset that great managers should never have to be asked for a raise, they should recognize that you deserve/need one (for whatever reason, to keep you happy, for peformance). A great manager would recognize what it takes to keep his team members productive, happy and still employed for him.

    Unfortunately I live in the real world and not all managers are "great". I've dropped hints that my wife, family, etc are pushing me to go after higher paying jobs. And while my direct manager is a wonderful person he hasn't gone to bat for me yet nor my director. I've made it known that while I love the company and the projects I do I can't afford to live where I do let alone buy a house and may have to start looking elsewhere if things don't change. Then they send me to more training and tell me what a good job I'm doing.

    I too am a bit scared to just walk in and ask for a raise. But I work for a very "low turnover" company where I would be one of the small minority that came and left within 5 years. Most everyone here is over 15 years.

    If you worked at a company that had a high defection rate and you were a quality employee (I am not trying to insinuate anything) that they would want to keep you. Therefore walking in saying you want a raise they may be more willing to keep you and give you the raise.

    Sorry If I rambled I do that sometimes.

    Thanks,
    Risu

  • User profile image
    Jazzynupe

    I feel the same way too. It is hard to go and demand more or ask for more. My problem is a little different in that the company has "Set" percentages that can be applied.

    So if someone came along where I got to continue to do what I love to do and at the same time I received a raise, then all the same I would move on.

    But to echo what you have said, it is something that sometimes is hard to do and if you feel you are worth it and have knowlege or skills that you don't believe you are bing compensated for, then it is important to find that "happy point" wether it is at the current employer or somewhere else.

  • User profile image
    Maurits

    A possibility occurs to me.  If you've gotten an offer from a company that offers a higher salary, you have a window of opportunity.  You can walk into your boss' office and say "I've got an offer from another company for such-and-such more money.  I'd rather stay here, but I owe it to my family (or myself, or...) to take this offer up.  I haven't decided to take it yet... I wanted to sleep on it."  Then he has the option to offer you a raise.  (He might need to go to his boss to OK the raise first, which is why you give him 24 hours...)

  • User profile image
    Jeremy W

    Maurits wrote:
    A possibility occurs to me.  If you've gotten an offer from a company that offers a higher salary, you have a window of opportunity.  You can walk into your boss' office and say "I've got an offer from another company for such-and-such more money.  I'd rather stay here, but I owe it to my family (or myself, or...) to take this offer up.  I haven't decided to take it yet... I wanted to sleep on it."  Then he has the option to offer you a raise.  (He might need to go to his boss to OK the raise first, which is why you give him 24 hours...)


    Bang on.

    You can then go back to the other company and let them know if you do decide to take the offer at your old company (especially if you're going through a recruiter).

    Don't go back and fortha  dozen times, but keeping the lines of communication open is key.

    That said, if you're leaving for MORE than salary reasons (as you said, better tech) then maybe the counteroffer from your current employer won't matter.

    Only broach the subject if it matters.

  • User profile image
    Blkbam

    Both of the methods you described are the wrong way to go.  Never do you want to make it seem as if the company must give you a raise or something because that is when they become defensive!  Leaving for more pay also has its risks because your new employer may think you're a flight risk if you aren't getting paid well.

    The best approach I've used is to schedule time with my boss and discuss my goals within the company both past and future.  Talking about goals will always lead you into a discussion of pay because your pay is usually determined by your ability to meet certain goals.  This is the point at which you express that you are feeling short changed.

    Just asking is not enough.  Like in court you must prove your case.  Bring evidence of your accomplishments to the meeting. Your work is what gets you paid; your accomplishments are what get you more.

    I understand that many people don't like their boss but if that's you then it's time to find a new job.  If you follow the chain of command in the company, it's you that makes your boss look good to his boss and so on up the line.  It's you bosses job to reward you for getting him rewarded. 

    It's also your boss’s job to keep you happy (and working there if you are good at what you do).  Many don't think it's a problem when their employees don't speak up because "no news is good news" when in reality that's a major red flag.  Feedback (good or bad) is important because it keeps the flow of communication flowing in both directions.  Like he said he didn't know so how is he supposed to compensate you?  As long as you keep the lines of communication open, you boss will always know your state of being.

  • User profile image
    harumscarum

    I agree. Never go back to a company that you decide to leave no matter how much they offer.

  • User profile image
    themaffeo

    Blkbam wrote:



    The best approach I've used is to schedule time with my boss and discuss my goals within the company both past and future.  Talking about goals will always lead you into a discussion of pay because your pay is usually determined by your ability to meet certain goals.  This is the point at which you express that you are feeling short changed.



    Hmm.  I think this is a pretty good idea.  Thanks!


    I also agree with your point of solely leaving for salary - the way you leave one company can signal to the next what might happen in the future.   In this case while pay was a factor, the biggest selling point was the opportunities in .net that my new company will provide me.

    Again.. thanks for the ideas.

  • User profile image
    rasx

    Everyone is making great points in this thread regarding the asking for pay issue. But let's not forget the "technology used" issue. This leads me to evaulate a company's technology plan which is a Warren-Buffet-like assesment of the IT department's ability to use technology over time.

    One of the worst feelings in the world is to paid a great salary but you are convinced that your organization's technology is literally stupid. Unless you know how to hang on quiet desperation, your co-workers at least will get wind of your opinion which could lead to a hostile work environment.

    So I must remember to interview the company when they interview me. I need to understand what they intend to do and what is actually there. The software "speaks" for itself. Since the folks at Microsoft use the word "architect" to describe the master code builders of IT organizations then we should be able to articulate their architectual design within a coherent narrative.

  • User profile image
    MrIgel

    i think everybody ever got in this conflict. In perfect circumstances a boss should always know if his employees are satisfied with their salary and should talk about it with them and how to improve or to raise it. But that all hypothetical. I also think that the best thing is to have two strings to one's bow at the most times. Jens

  • User profile image
    phunky_avoc​ado

    That is exactly what happened to me.  I went out and found another job, went into my manager with my resignation letter in hand, they then told me that they wanted to make a counter offer and so they did and I was given exactly a 50% raise on the spot.  I had no idea that was going to happen but was glad it did.

    Maurits wrote:
    A possibility occurs to me.  If you've gotten an offer from a company that offers a higher salary, you have a window of opportunity.  You can walk into your boss' office and say "I've got an offer from another company for such-and-such more money.  I'd rather stay here, but I owe it to my family (or myself, or...) to take this offer up.  I haven't decided to take it yet... I wanted to sleep on it."  Then he has the option to offer you a raise.  (He might need to go to his boss to OK the raise first, which is why you give him 24 hours...)

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