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Oh My God an MVP! [MSDN Forums related]

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  • littleguru

    I dislike them, yes I do! At least a few of them. I really do.

    They think to be so cool and think to know everything. It's so hard.

    I had a discussion at MSDN Forums about the difference between "string" and "String" in C#. They are the same, as most will know. "string" is only a keyword that is translated to "String" by the C# compiler.

    But, hey, that MVP thinks to be cool and messes everything up. Now the other guy, who asked the question, is completely confused. He doesn't read my answers or isn't willing to believe me - you know I don't have a cool MVP tag under my nick at MSDN Forums.

    The best is that the MVP said that "string" was introduced because in JAVA they have only "string". Seems as if the guy never did JAVA, since JAVA has "String".

    Crazy stuff happens over there. Why is everybody only believing MVPs?

    MVPs should really do an exam on their topic! Please, please MSDN Forums team, remove the MVP tag!

    *frustrated*

  • Chadk

    I know several MVP's in real life. They are cool people.

    But the internet does something to people.

    But i have also seen several times, MvP's on the MSDN forums, they are arrogant.

  • AndyC

    There are plenty of MVPs who do a great job. Really, there are.

    Unfortunately there are also some who seem to think that community participation is best acheived by just answering every question, even if you get them wrong or if you are just blindly cutting and pasting from a Google/MSDN search. Sadly the MVP program seems to recognise these ones the most, presumably because they're the ones most visible and so they are the ones that tend to stick around.

  • dahat

    Sadly some folks on the forums (both MVP and not whose names I will not say but are easy enough to find) make it a point to post as often as they can so they can keep their total and monthly post counts nice and high so as to be more noticed.

  • Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    littleguru wrote:
    I dislike them, yes I do! At least a few of them. I really do.

    They think to be so cool and think to know everything. It's so hard.

    I had a discussion at MSDN Forums about the difference between "string" and "String" in C#. They are the same, as most will know. "string" is only a keyword that is translated to "String" by the C# compiler.

    But, hey, that MVP thinks to be cool and messes everything up. Now the other guy, who asked the question, is completely confused. He doesn't read my answers or isn't willing to believe me - you know I don't have a cool MVP tag under my nick at MSDN Forums.

    The best is that the MVP said that "string" was introduced because in JAVA they have only "string". Seems as if the guy never did JAVA, since JAVA has also "String".

    Crazy stuff happens over there. Why is everybody only believing MVPs?

    MVPs should really do an exam on their topic! Please, please MSDN Forums team, remove the MVP tag!

    *frustrated*


    Well, Java doesn't have a string class at all.  String is only located at java.lang.String--  using a lowercase letter will give you a compiler error.

    The lowercase String is probably in there for compatibility with C++.  The C++ string class is lowercase (and using uppercase will give you a compiler error, I think).

  • blowdart

    littleguru wrote:
    
    MVPs should really do an exam on their topic! Please, please MSDN Forums team, remove the MVP tag!

    *frustrated*


    Hold on, weren't you asking how you got MVP status not so long ago? Like anything else there are both good and bad MVPs. I know a bunch of the SQL ones, and a lot of the UK .Net ones as well through conferences and they're all damned nice people.

    But like anything I have no doubt some MVPs scrabble around keeping their post count high so come renewal time they have looked busy throughout the year. One of the problems with the process is there is no external feedback and on community involvment, forums especially, quantity will beat quality because there seems to be very little checking.

  • JChung2006

    Don't just say that he is wrong.  Provide evidence.

    Example:

    http://java.sun.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/String.html

    According to Sun's Java documentation about the String class, it has been available since the JDK's first release (JDK 1.0).

    C# string is an alias for the .NET System.String class.

    http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/362314fe.aspx

    However, that is an implementation artifact since C# doesn't have to target the .NET platform.

    As for people who ignore you because you don't have the MVP tag, they're fools for blindly following MVP's, and sometimes the only way for people like that to learn is to suffer the consequences of their mistakes.

  • littleguru

    blowdart, don't get me wrong... I know that there is always good and bad people. But it frustrates me that an MVP is only creating posts to have them created, without knowing what he/she is exactly talking about. It's a cool strategy to confuse people to get your post's count up!

    I still want to become an MVP! That doesn't change my intention. And I won't be such a guy, who is only increasing his post count and answering everything to have more posts.

  • littleguru

    CannotResolveSymbol wrote:
    Well, Java doesn't have a string class at all.  String is only located at java.lang.String--  using a lowercase letter will give you a compiler error.

    The lowercase String is probably in there for compatibility with C++.  The C++ string class is lowercase (and using uppercase will give you a compiler error, I think).


    I never said that JAVA has a "string" class. JAVA has a "String" class. But JAVA offers you the "string" keyword which is an unboxed string (more like a structure)! In JAVA "string" != "String". In C# "string" == "String".

  • LaBomba

    Not all MVP's are bad apples...

    take for example C9's very own Zeo.

    He's not a bad apple, in fact he got a job at Microsoft.

  • Cornelius Ellsonpeter

    LaBomba wrote:
    Not all MVP's are bad apples...

    take for example C9's very own Zeo.

    He's not a bad apple, in fact he got a job at Microsoft.

    Yes, that's right. In fact, even StaceyW is an MVP:

    MVP Hall of Fame


             

    In fact, I'll bet even DorkVista is a closet MVP. Or maybe he is a secret Linux fanatic?


  • blowdart

    littleguru wrote:
    blowdart, don't get me wrong... I know that there is always good and bad people. But it frustrates me that an MVP is only creating posts to have them created, without knowing what he/she is exactly talking about. It's a cool strategy to confuse people to get your post's count up!

    I still want to become an MVP! That doesn't change my intention. And I won't be such a guy, who is only increasing his post count and answering everything to have more posts.


    But then you have a problem; the things people got scored on are

    • Active Participation in a Microsoft Online Community
    • Community Guru - 'Answer More Questions Than They Ask
    • Recognized Expert in a Field or Particular Competency
    • Neutral to Positive Attitude Toward Microsoft
    • Knowledge Sharer
    • Outstanding Community Involvement
    • Trusted Source
    • Information Advocate

  • Sven Groot

    littleguru wrote:
    I never said that JAVA has a "string" class. JAVA has a "String" class. But JAVA offers you the "string" keyword which is an unboxed string (more like a structure)! In JAVA "string" != "String". In C# "string" == "String".

    It's been a while since I used java, but I don't think java has anything called string at all (kayword, class, or anything), only String.

    In C#, the string keyword is an alias for System.String. In all important aspects they are the same. Most importantly, typeof(string) == typeof(System.String).

    EDIT: It might be you're confused because it is true that Java's "int" keyword does not map directly to the "java.lang.Integer" class (this is different in C# because there int is just an alias for System.Int32; just like string and System.String, they are the same). But Java has no "string" keyword, only a String class.

  • littleguru

    Sven Groot wrote:
    
    littleguru wrote: I never said that JAVA has a "string" class. JAVA has a "String" class. But JAVA offers you the "string" keyword which is an unboxed string (more like a structure)! In JAVA "string" != "String". In C# "string" == "String".

    It's been a while since I used java, but I don't think java has anything called string at all (kayword, class, or anything), only String.

    In C#, the string keyword is an alias for System.String. In all important aspects they are the same. Most importantly, typeof(string) == typeof(System.String).


    *getting red now* Damn! And I did java coding today ... Sure it has no "string". It has only "int" and "Integer" etc. Sorry for that to everybody!

    For my reputation:
    I didn't mention that in the MSDN forums. I only said there that JAVA has "String".

  • littleguru

    blowdart wrote:
    But then you have a problem; the things people got scored on are

    • Active Participation in a Microsoft Online Community
    • Community Guru - 'Answer More Questions Than They Ask
    • Recognized Expert in a Field or Particular Competency
    • Neutral to Positive Attitude Toward Microsoft
    • Knowledge Sharer
    • Outstanding Community Involvement
    • Trusted Source
    • Information Advocate



    First: Check
    Second: hahahaha... I'll answer my own questions
    Third: Going to be hard, but possible
    Fourth: Check
    Fifth: Check
    Sixth: I'm a niner. That must be enough.
    Seventh: I hope so
    Eight: Expressionless

  • Lazycoder2

    I posted this reply in the MSDN forum, but I'll post it here for posterity too.

    Look at this code snippet and the resulting IL.

            static void Main(string[] args) {
                String foo = String.Empty;
                string foo2 = string.Empty;
            }


    .method private hidebysig static void  Main(string[] args) cil managed
    {
      .entrypoint
      // Code size       13 (0xd)
      .maxstack  8
      IL_0000:  ldsfld     string [mscorlib]System.String::Empty
      IL_0005:  pop
      IL_0006:  ldsfld     string [mscorlib]System.String::Empty
      IL_000b:  pop
      IL_000c:  ret
    } // end of method Program::Main

  • UlsterFry

    Hey,  don't be so highly strung.


    See what I did there.. string, strung..  bah..  forget it  Tongue Out

  • Ion Todirel

    i hate MSDN Forums

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