Coffeehouse Thread

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Is there a Microsoft "Safety Net"?

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  • User profile image
    Massif

    Do products designed to compete with MS products benefit from the existance of the MS products to some small degree?

    I was considering this, as Firefox updated itself to 2.0.1 or whatever version it's just become. If it failed to update where would I be left? Naturally, I'd have to re-install Firefox (if it failed, the nice people at Mozilla make a reliable browser, and I'm not saying it is likely to fail - Firefox in this case is just an example, please insert Realplayer, Quicktime or anything else which competes with MS if that suits you.) Now, to re-install firefox I'd have to either have the original installation, or download a new one - which would involve using IE.

    So, if Firefox falls over I'd have to use IE to repair it? Are they only able to agressively update because they know if they fail then customers can rely on IE?

    Does that apply to realplayer / quicktime / other competing apps. Are they able to agressively update their apps because they can be less neurotic about failures - because if they break it the worst that happens is their customers go back to MS's products.

    Does that allow them to develop faster? Because their testing can afford to be 99% instead of 99.9% certain?

    (Likewise for people competing on other platforms, i.e. I could always revert to Safari on a Mac.)

    Just curious.

  • User profile image
    Massif

    As an aside, they appear to have broken my favourites menu! It could just be rebuilding it though.

    [edit:] Nope, it's definitely broken. And there I was thinking nice thoughts about them. Given that the extra functionality introduced in a 0.0.1 version change, breaking something fundamental isn't great progress.

  • User profile image
    koorb

    That is an interesting point. Certainly you could use Opera to get FireFox, but without a built in browser in the OS there is no way to obtain an alternative in the first place.

    Similar situation with Linux distributions but at least you can get them sent to you on CD.

  • User profile image
    liquidplast​ik

    Just use the default FTP client that is bundled with windows to access a file repository where you might find the latest builds of Firefox or whatever you want.

    Just open your command prompt and enter the following to download Firefox:

    ftp -A ftp.heanet.ie
    cd /mirrors/ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/firefox/releases/2.0.0.1/win32/en-US/
    binary
    get "Firefox Setup 2.0.0.1.exe" "c:\Firefox Setup 2.0.0.1.exe"

    Simple Smiley

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    liquidplastik wrote:
    Just use the default FTP client that is bundled with windows to access a file repository where you might find the latest builds of Firefox or whatever you want.

    Just open your command prompt and enter the following to download Firefox:

    ftp -A ftp.heanet.ie
    cd /mirrors/ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/firefox/releases/2.0.0.1/win32/en-US/
    binary
    get "Firefox Setup 2.0.0.1.exe" "c:\Firefox Setup 2.0.0.1.exe"

    Simple


    But the FTP client still comes from Microsoft...  and how do you find the file repository in the first place, without being psychic or having used a web browser to get to the repository?

  • User profile image
    liquidplast​ik

    CannotResolveSymbol wrote:
    
    liquidplastik wrote:Just use the default FTP client that is bundled with windows to access a file repository where you might find the latest builds of Firefox or whatever you want.

    Just open your command prompt and enter the following to download Firefox:

    ftp -A ftp.heanet.ie
    cd /mirrors/ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/firefox/releases/2.0.0.1/win32/en-US/
    binary
    get "Firefox Setup 2.0.0.1.exe" "c:\Firefox Setup 2.0.0.1.exe"

    Simple


    But the FTP client still comes from Microsoft...  and how do you find the file repository in the first place, without being psychic or having used a web browser to get to the repository?


    Sure the FTP client comes from Microsoft, you are using a Microsoft Product (Windows). Unless your OS comes bundled with third party software you would have no choice but to use Microsoft software to access anything obviously. If by "psychic" you mean you might have to use your mind, then yes. Just memorize your favorite repository, or any one at that. Write it down, take a picture, whatever hehe.
    Basically, yes, if you are going to use a Microsoft OS then it's obvious that at some point you would have to use Microsoft software to get another piece of software. Hell, technically you are using Microsoft software just by executing the executable. Depends on how technical you want to be I guess.

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