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Lambda Origions

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  • User profile image
    odujosh

    http://swiss.csail.mit.edu/classes/6.001/abelson-sussman-lectures/

    Good brush up for people like me that thought with a little mixed in ignorance Lambda expressions are a newish programming thing. I think one of the true testiments that your a geek is if during Lecture 1a you have an itch that hmm should I download March CTP of Orcas to define my own GoodEnough...Smiley

    Anyways fascinating lectures thus far only as far as lecture 3. The material is a little dense but fun. Suprisingly approachable.

  • User profile image
    Richard.Hein

    Big Smile

    Good call, these are great lectures.  I've watched the first 5 or 6 lectures a couple of years ago when MIT first put up the OpenCourseWare site, but because I can't apply a lot of the concepts to my "real job code", and because I started to get lost (I couldn't get a decent interpreter installed to actually try this stuff out), I never finished.  Now I get to try to put it into practice.  F# looks simply perfect for this.  C# perhaps, but that remains to be seen.

    Seriously, I've contemplated going through every sample in the Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs in turn and try to make C# and F# versions.  Perhaps I'll be ambitious enough to try if I can ever I get this Orcas May CTP VPC image decompressed (6GB!). 

     Expressionless

  • User profile image
    odujosh

    Windows Scheme interpreter. Scheme is a dialect of Lisp. If any one is interested:
    http://www.schemers.com/download.html

  • User profile image
    littleguru

    Ooooh Lambda expressions are old. Really old. They get just popular right now, because of the Microsoft's effort to add them to their languages.

  • User profile image
    raymond

    littleguru wrote:
    Ooooh Lambda expressions are old. Really old. They get just popular right now, because of the Microsoft's effort to add them to their languages.


    Ditto


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambda_calculus

    http://www.inf.fu-berlin.de/lehre/WS03/alpi/lambda.pdf

    http://ling.ucsd.edu/~barker/Lambda/

    Let Anders, Brian and Don handle it. Wink

    Anders Hejlsberg and Chris McConnell: Reflections on LINQ, Desktop Search, WinFS, Functional and Intentional Programming

    http://channel9.msdn.com/Showpost.aspx?postid=260202

    Don Syme: Introduction to F#, Part 1
    http://channel9.msdn.com/Showpost.aspx?postid=234632

    Don Syme: Introduction to F#, Part 2
    http://channel9.msdn.com/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=237825#237825


    Don Syme's Blog
    http://blogs.msdn.com/dsyme/

    Brian Beckman: Monads, Monoids, and Mort
    http://channel9.msdn.com/Showpost.aspx?postid=230438

    Cool

  • User profile image
    brian.​shapiro

    littleguru wrote:
    Ooooh Lambda expressions are old. Really old. They get just popular right now, because of the Microsoft's effort to add them to their languages.


    When I took computer science at Berkeley (around 1998) the first course was taught in Scheme, so I had my introduction to Lambda expressions then. I think their approach to teaching was right, because I think its important to understand concepts behind programming first. You can always learn the syntax of a new language.

    Of course I already understood the basics of programming before I started--which you're supposed to in order to enter the first course, there's an entry exam--otherwise you take a lower level introductory course taught in C++. The entry exam is basically just being able to write a recursive algorithm. After the Scheme course, you take one in Java, then in assembly.

    But even before I studied computer science, I always wanted the ability to do something like a lambda expression. It just makes programming more flexible and natural from the perspective of abstract logic.

    I really think though, if they're not already, the nix geeks at universities have to take seriously some of the projects at Microsoft that have germinated from Microsoft research, because I think they're based on important concepts. I didn't do a degree in computer science, so I don't know that they don't already for certain, but I think they need serious courses on user interfaces. I think it would also be important to offer courses on the history of programming languages and the history of UIs.

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