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Recommend Design Patterns books

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  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    At this point in development, it's pretty clear I need a patterns book.

    I was thinking of the "Gang of Four" original, but it's written for C++ and Smalltalk, but I've been told there's a version for C#

    ...and I've heard enough bad things about "Head First Design Patterns" (both Coding Horror's debunking of the content within....and the Vagisil affair.

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    The gang of four book is essential reading. It's actually pretty language neutral. As long as you're comfortable reading C-style code examples it's fine.

  • User profile image
    Larsenal

    W3bbo wrote:
    At this point in development, it's pretty clear I need a patterns book.


    I'm interested in why "it's pretty clear" you need a patterns book?  A specific problem or just feel the need to broaden your horizons?

    (I actually bought and read the Head First book.  Yes, it could have been much better, but it was at least useful in introducing the topic and getting the wheels turning.)

    Edit:  And I must have missed the memo about what you've been working on lately.  Can you share or is it top-secret?

  • User profile image
    phreaks

    I like the doFactory website...

    Patterns explained and represented in UML...

    As was noted previously, patterns are language neutral, but I understand not wanting to read thru c style code samples.

    DoFactory typically provides a C# example as well...

    Link Goodness -->
    http://www.dofactory.com/Patterns/PatternCommand.aspx

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Larsenal wrote:
    I'm interested in why "it's pretty clear" you need a patterns book?  A specific problem or just feel the need to broaden your horizons?


    Oh, I didn't mean to write "at this point in development", I meant something along the lines of "at this point in my software development experience", it's a progressive thing. You start off with basic OOP then get into proper patterns. I'm at that stage now and don't want to develop any bad habits.

    Larsenal wrote:
    Edit:  And I must have missed the memo about what you've been working on lately.  Can you share or is it top-secret?


    Oh, nothing special; just a webserver statistics analytics engine that doesn't suck. I figured I'd give all my friends and contacts on C9 free copies because I'm a nice guy (you're included).

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    phreaks wrote:
    I like the doFactory website...

    Patterns explained and represented in UML...

    As was noted previously, patterns are language neutral, but I understand not wanting to read thru c style code samples.

    DoFactory typically provides a C# example as well...

    Link Goodness -->
    http://www.dofactory.com/Patterns/PatternCommand.aspx


    Nice link, thanks.

    ....but now I need to learn UML.

  • User profile image
    ben2004uk

    One of my favorite development books is

    Applying UML and Patterns: An Introduction to Object-Oriented Analysis and Design and Iterative Development (Hardcover)
    by Craig Larman

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Applying-UML-Patterns-Introduction-Object-Oriented/dp/0131489062/ref=sr_1_1/026-7856018-5738861?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1176325050&sr=8-1

    Its a great book, covers the main patterns and gives a very good overview of system design.  Code is based on java but C# can be downloaded.  But patterns are more about the concept anyway.

  • User profile image
    irascian

    I can't lay my hands on it at the moment but there's a good Patterns book by Martin Fowler that gives the examples in Java and C#.

    There also used to be some good free books from the Microsoft Patterns and Practices group.  "Enterprise Solution Patterns using Microsoft.Net" is something you can download for free and print out, or if you prefer order as a book from Microsoft Press. From the same team there's also "Integration Patterns".

  • User profile image
    jb43081

    W3bbo wrote:
    I was thinking of the "Gang of Four" original, but it's written for C++ and Smalltalk, but I've been told there's a version for C#


    The GO4 book is required reading for anybody who wants to be a lead developer at my company. Yeah, the code samples are in C++ and Smalltalk, but they are pretty simple and if you can program C# you should be able to figure it out.

  • User profile image
    littleguru

    Design Patterns C# is not that bad. I liked it because it describes a lot of the design patterns and has very nice C# sample code.

  • User profile image
    Sourcecode

    W3bbo wrote:
    
    W3bbo wrote: I was thinking of the "Gang of Four" original, but it's written for C++ and Smalltalk, but I've been told there's a version for C#



    ++ on the GOF book.

    The book may be geared toward smalltalk and c++ but most of the examples are not that complex as far as code goes. I found It got more into the practice, use cases etc for the different patters. It does a bang up job of explaining the different patterns. Good enough that you can apply it to almost any language.

    Definitely a must for anyone wanting to get into OOP patterns.

    I's a valuble resource that still holds true today, but don't stop there. Get whatever you can lay your hands on. 

  • User profile image
    Dr Herbie

    Sourcecode wrote:
    
    W3bbo wrote: 
    W3bbo wrote: I was thinking of the "Gang of Four" original, but it's written for C++ and Smalltalk, but I've been told there's a version for C#



    ++ on the GOF book.

    The book may be geared toward smalltalk and c++ but most of the examples are not that complex as far as code goes. I found It got more into the practice, use cases etc for the different patters. It does a bang up job of explaining the different patterns. Good enough that you can apply it to almost any language.

    Definitely a must for anyone wanting to get into OOP patterns.

    I's a valuble resource that still holds true today, but don't stop there. Get whatever you can lay your hands on. 



    And another ++ for GoF.  It's not really language specific, despite the example code.  I don't understand Smalltalk (keep meaning to learn it) but I got the gist of the examples well enough.

    I would also recommend Refactoring to Patterns to round off the GoF book, although it does follow on from Fowler's Refactoring so the three of them are a good set (if you can afford it).
    Refactoring to Patterns helped me understand the general design patterns approach better because it deals with the transition from non-pattern designs to pattern designs.

    I wouldn't get too deep into UML, by the way.  It can go very deep, but I've only ever found the basics to be useful.

    If you want free pattern information, you could always dig through papers from the entertainingly titled PLoP conferences.  There are a lot of papers you can get on-line. It can be a bit of a trawl, but there are a few gems that crop up.

    Herbie

  • User profile image
    arwhitfield

    irascian wrote:
    I can't lay my hands on it at the moment but there's a good Patterns book by Martin Fowler that gives the examples in Java and C#.


    After the GoF book, the one from Fowler, "Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture" is really good...
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Enterprise-Application-Architecture-Addison-Wesley-Signature/dp/0321127420/ref=pd_bbs_sr_4/202-6853497-4798229?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1176379285&sr=8-4

  • User profile image
    Scott.​Esbrandt

    irascian wrote:
    I can't lay my hands on it at the moment but there's a good Patterns book by Martin Fowler that gives the examples in Java and C#.

    There also used to be some good free books from the Microsoft Patterns and Practices group.  "Enterprise Solution Patterns using Microsoft.Net" is something you can download for free and print out, or if you prefer order as a book from Microsoft Press. From the same team there's also "Integration Patterns".


    I have Fowler's book, "Refactoring: Improving the Design of Exisiting Code", which is a very very good read.  If the patterns book is anywhere near that caliber it should be real useful. 

  • User profile image
    Adrian​JMartin

    The Head First is a good patterns book.


    Jeff even says that in his blog's comments - His blog entry was about the books advice about patterns adding complexity to a project being left to near the end of the book, and not at the beginning


    The book is quick and it does cover the major patterns.



    A far as I know vagisil is not available in my country so that affair is a none issue

  • User profile image
    ben2004uk

    Head First is good if you don't understand the concept of what Design Patterns are and aren't great at OO,  however its really fustrating if you do because it over does the abstraction and doesn't get to the nitty gritty.

    I picked up my copy last month to read about the Observer pattern and it annoyed the hell out of me so I went to the GOF book - much much better.   Still need to read most of the GOF book Sad

  • User profile image
    Lee_Dale

    arwhitfield wrote:
    
    irascian wrote:I can't lay my hands on it at the moment but there's a good Patterns book by Martin Fowler that gives the examples in Java and C#.


    After the GoF book, the one from Fowler, "Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture" is really good...
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Enterprise-Application-Architecture-Addison-Wesley-Signature/dp/0321127420/ref=pd_bbs_sr_4/202-6853497-4798229?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1176379285&sr=8-4


    Yep ill second that Big Smile

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