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Why many Wintel support people dislike the Mac ... :rolleyes:

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  • User profile image
    Ray6

    Paul Murphy takes his turn at perpetuating one of the most widespread and factually incorrect myths in ITdom

    Why many Windows support people hate Macs

    Paul seems to be implying that the reason that Windows support people don't like Macs, is because they need no support, and that would be doing themselves out of a job.

    Of course the reason there is no 'Mac support industry' as he puts it, is because the Mac has very little penetration in the enterprise; what is the point of building an industry for a product that really doesn't hold any sway in that sector?

    Yes, I'm sure that a lot of money is made from Windows support, and one could argue that with such a limited choice of hardware options, a Mac would indeed be easier to support, but until the Mac is a bigger enterprise player, then no-one will know for sure, and Jobs is not going commit commercial suicide by going up against Windows/Linux in the enterprise (at least not directly anyway).

    I wonder if the chaps who spread this myth, have actually asked a Windows admin chap if it is true or not? I have a few friends who administer Windows servers, and so I put the question to them.

    Pretty much all of them said the same thing:

    'Well, a PC can do anything a Mac can do, and I don't want to make life harder for myself by mixing operating systems when there is no need to.'

    So whether they are right or not, the actual reason in their own minds, is because they want to keep their work load down, not raise it.




  • User profile image
    AndyC

    ROFL

    Seriously, I work in a heterogeneous environment and the Windows clients require significantly less support time per client than the Mac and Linux equivalent, mainly due to centralized management tools like Active Directory and Group Policy.

  • User profile image
    brichpmr

    In our enterprise, the Macs and PCs are all managed via AD along with Open Directory. It's not difficult if the IT guys have sufficient basic knowledge of both platforms. Other enterprises utilize solutions like Direct Control by Centrify, which helps them overcome the limitations of AD in heterogeneous environments. The idea that your enterprise should limit their supported platforms to whatever makes it easier for your IT support is a concept that belongs in the previous century.

  • User profile image
    Ray6

    brichpmr wrote:
    In our enterprise, the Macs and PCs are all managed via AD along with Open Directory. It's not difficult if the IT guys have sufficient basic knowledge of both platforms. Other enterprises utilize solutions like Direct Control by Centrify, which helps them overcome the limitations of AD in heterogeneous environments. The idea that your enterprise should limit their supported platforms to whatever makes it easier for your IT support is a concept that belongs in the previous century.


    These days, it is unusual for sysadmins to dictate what the users get to use. If there is a valid case for having a Mac on the network, then  none of these chaps mind having them (in fact, one of them uses Macs exclusively when he gets home), but if the main requirement for their desktop systems is to run Office for example, then that doesn't really appear to be a valid case.

    I used to work for an organisation that used Macs in graphic design because they rendered much better printed output than Windows-based PCs. Interestingly enough, they switched to Windows a while back, because Windows renders better on screen, which is now where most of their stuff is read. But they still have a couple of Macs on standby, and the Windows administrators have no problem with having them there. In fact, they appreciate the lack of a viruses on the Mac platform, even though they do use virus checkers on them (dunno which one though).

    Having said that though, I have seen quite a few sysadmins that wield WAY too much power in the organisation.

  • User profile image
    Ray6

    AndyC wrote:
    ROFL

    Seriously, I work in a heterogeneous environment and the Windows clients require significantly less support time per client than the Mac and Linux equivalent, mainly due to centralized management tools like Active Directory and Group Policy.


    That was kind of my point.

    The notion that Windows sysadmins don't like Macs because they're too easy, is a bit of a myth.

  • User profile image
    brichpmr

    My company has evolved from a totally win-centric enterprise to one that is becoming more platform agnostic. We still use cheap XP boxen for cubicle farm drones, but OSX machines are making inroads, often driven by upper level managers and IT staff who have acquired MacBooks or iMacs for personal use (and now the iPhone as well), and want to use them in the corporate space too. By the way, the most unobtrusive virus checker I've used on the Mac side is Intego's VirusBarrier X4. Of course, it never finds anything, but it does make our compliance officers feel better.

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