Coffeehouse Thread

11 posts

Language Experience

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    Cornelius Ellsonpeter

    I'm just curious what everybody's language/technology experience is, and how long it took you to get to that point. Often times I'll read so many posts on this board, and it seems like there are a few people who seem to know "everything" but I know that can't be true. Some days I find that interesting, other days, it's tiring because I wonder how many people just sit and Google things and then claim to "know" the answer.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Cornelius Ellsonpeter wrote:
    I'm just curious what everybody's language/technology experience is, and how long it took you to get to that point. Often times I'll read so many posts on this board, and it seems like there are a few people who seem to know "everything" but I know that can't be true. Some days I find that interesting, other days, it's tiring because I wonder how many people just sit and Google things and then claim to "know" the answer.


    It's not the language that's the problem, it's the size of the framework behind it. C#? I'm comfortable with most of it (anonymous delegate still make me cringe, and I never manage to get predicates right without looking it up again), but the framework? Lord. Right now I'm doing a bunch of cardspace stuff, and I can get just about enough advanced WCF to make it work, but some of it is still guesswork (admittedly due to poor documentation)

  • User profile image
    Lee_Dale

    I'm a AI robot like Johnny 5!

    Trouble is I've been taught with MS Press books that's why I appear to know nothing Perplexed

  • User profile image
    Cornelius Ellsonpeter

    blowdart wrote:
    
    Cornelius Ellsonpeter wrote:
    I'm just curious what everybody's language/technology experience is, and how long it took you to get to that point. Often times I'll read so many posts on this board, and it seems like there are a few people who seem to know "everything" but I know that can't be true. Some days I find that interesting, other days, it's tiring because I wonder how many people just sit and Google things and then claim to "know" the answer.

    It's not the language that's the problem, it's the size of the framework behind it. C#? I'm comfortable with most of it (anonymous delegate still make me cringe, and I never manage to get predicates right without looking it up again), but the framework? Lord. Right now I'm doing a bunch of cardspace stuff, and I can get just about enough advanced WCF to make it work, but some of it is still guesswork (admittedly due to poor documentation)
    I agree...some of these frameworks are so huge. And then, by the time you have a general enough handle on it, another one rolls out. These things are being produced by teams of people, and so it is going to be overwhelming for one person to learn (and least I'm finding it that way). Incomplete documentation doesn't help, either. I'm fairly comfortable now with C# also, and I know it wouldn't take much to get a decent handle on VB.NET (because I used other BASICs in the past, and know a fair amount about object orientated programming, etc.). I'm to the point where I've built up a decent rack full of books, but good grief I'm not going to spend years reading through every page of them. Some of them are there for reference.

    I guess it's just irritating to come on here some days and see a W3bbo post where he claims to have an answer, but it's half wrong. Then I'll see someone else join in, and their info is mixed up too. I guess most forums are like that...but it's just frustrating some days more than others. I know, I know...why do I even come here then? Perplexed

  • User profile image
    DigitalDud

    leeappdalecom wrote:
    I'm a AI robot like Johnny 5!

    Trouble is I've been taught with MS Press books that's why I appear to know nothing


    Ba-dump-pssh.

  • User profile image
    Lee_Dale

    DigitalDud wrote:
    
    leeappdalecom wrote:
    I'm a AI robot like Johnny 5!

    Trouble is I've been taught with MS Press books that's why I appear to know nothing


    Ba-dump-pssh.


    I here all day folks Tongue Out

    Well actually just for another 15mins then I'm off down the pub Cool

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    Cornelius Ellsonpeter wrote:
    I'm just curious what everybody's language/technology experience is, and how long it took you to get to that point. Often times I'll read so many posts on this board, and it seems like there are a few people who seem to know "everything" but I know that can't be true. Some days I find that interesting, other days, it's tiring because I wonder how many people just sit and Google things and then claim to "know" the answer.


    There's not a lot of differences between languages.  Once you've learned a few, you can pick up most languages with only a few weeks worth of work.  While in school, I learned: Pascal, C, C++, Fortran, Cobol, Logo, Lisp, Prolog and Macro Assembler.  Most of them I still remember well enough to be proficient with them, and the rest I could relearn in a few weeks.  Since school I've also learned Java, JavaScript, VB, VB.NET, C#, Python and Ruby.  Most on that list I've used professionally.  I'll claim "expertise" in only a few of them, but know enough about all of them to hold my own.  Honestly, it should not be difficult for anyone to learn as many languages, because in general there's not that much variation in any of them.

    As for the frameworks... yes, there's a lot more to learn there, but it's something you should be able to "learn" on the job as long as you have an understanding of the language and enough reference material at hand (and Google is almost always enough reference material).

    As for partial answers on forums... well, since in general you give partial questions and the responder isn't trying to write the entire solution for you in general, that should be what you expect.  If you want a complete answer, be sure to provide a complete question with example code for what you're trying to accomplish.

  • User profile image
    Richard.Hein

    I've been programming since I was 7 years old and in many languages, but there's always something you can learn by reading other people's code - whether it's a more elegant way to implement a certain pattern or algorithm in code, or a completely different idiom, like pattern matching in F# which I have recently been learning, learning a language is not quite enough to become proficient.  It takes time and practice writing things to become proficient at English, and time and practice writing code to become proficient at that as well.  Most languages are similiar, so it's more a style thing than trying to write in a foreign language, but there are exceptions in programming languages.  Learning a lot of very DIFFERENT languages is pretty important to increase your awareness of what is possible, what is not and what should be in your current language of choice (or your bosses).

    As for learning frameworks - that's a matter of variety.  The variety of things you TRY to implement will lead you to various corners of the framework you are using, and expose you to different libraries.  Programming a Windows Forms application versus a Windows Service versus an ASP.NET application or Enterprise Services derived class, will expose you to various areas of the framework that you can't learn just by reading - it would take far too long.

  • User profile image
    Xaero_​Vincent

    I know some XHTML and CSS as far as web page development (basic elements for Web 1.0 pages).

    I'll probably learn Javascript, AJAX and other web technologies at somepoin but my focus isn't to be a web designer.

    I used to use Euphoria but now learning a little Python (procedural-only context). I guess I end up having to use the classes and objects from the standard libraries but those seem easy to understand so far.

  • User profile image
    cheong

    It doesn't really matter.

    If you found the problem "interesting" so you want to know the answer too, and you think you know the keyword to find the answer, go search for it and share your findings. In this way both the asker and yourself learn something new and useful, and others on the web gain better chance of searching it, and just in case a few month/years later you forgot it, there's good chance that the answer will hide somewhere in  the archieves.

    So we don't really know everything, but we don't regret being a "human looking search engine" for the questions we have interest in.

    At least it's what I think.

    Recent Achievement unlocked: Code Avenger Tier 4/6: You see dead program. A lot!
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    l0st.en.​Drago

    I'm comfortable with PHP & understand SQL. I've been coding C# for about 8 days. Still getting my feet wet. As for google! It's the same as going back in a text book. Who doesn't use FAQ's or Help menus? Google is the same thing.

Comments closed

Comments have been closed since this content was published more than 30 days ago, but if you'd like to continue the conversation, please create a new thread in our Forums, or Contact Us and let us know.