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Linux hits the high street

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  • User profile image
    GoddersUK

    Tesco have now started selling Linux (Ubuntu) boxes online.

    If these hit the high street stores then this represents the first real threat to Microsoft from Linux. Many people still by there PCs from "real" shops and Linux appearing in this area will have far more weight then a button on the Dell website. Especialy since the Dell website doesn't exactly encourage you to go with Linux.

    But seeing Linux in the shops will bring it to the attention of the general public -woah I can get something other than Windows without having to shell out for Apple hardware.

  • User profile image
    Dr Herbie

    GoddersUK wrote:
    Tesco have now started selling Linux (Ubuntu) boxes online.

    If these hit the high street stores then this represents the first real threat to Microsoft from Linux. Many people still by there PCs from "real" shops and Linux appearing in this area will have far more weight then a button on the Dell website. Especialy since the Dell website doesn't exactly encourage you to go with Linux.

    But seeing Linux in the shops will bring it to the attention of the general public -woah I can get something other than Windows without having to shell out for Apple hardware.


    You've been able to buy Linux in PC World (and occasionally I've seen it in Dixons\Currys)  for years (it's where I got Turbo-Linux years ago).

    But Tesco could certainly make a difference.

    Herbie

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    You've been able to purchase one distro of Linux or another from pretty much every US computer store for years.  In fact, I purchased Red Hat from Best Buy back around '95 or '96.  This really isn't anything new, and isn't going to make any difference to the adoption of Linux by consumers.

  • User profile image
    GoddersUK

    wkempf wrote:
    You've been able to purchase one distro of Linux or another from pretty much every US computer store for years.  In fact, I purchased Red Hat from Best Buy back around '95 or '96.  This really isn't anything new, and isn't going to make any difference to the adoption of Linux by consumers.


    But not in the UK.

    At least not majorly. The whole point about it being tesco is that if they do sell this system in their larger stores (they do sell some systems in their larger stores) there hitting a whole new market of people that wouldn't normaly go into PC stores.

  • User profile image
    Adrian​JMartin

    And then Tesco will make more money by selling Windows at Retail prices!

  • User profile image
    Angus

    This is very interesting (I believe).

    I think it could cause some level (elevated [that is]) of animosity towards Linux. The average buyer will see the computer on sale at a low price, and simply buy it. (They then will question "Why is [insert name of application here] not working?").

    I (personally have) found the transition between Windows and Linux very easy (mainly due to Ubuntu [the simplicity of Ubuntu {to be precise}]).

    Angus Higgins

  • User profile image
    Adrian​JMartin

    Its not a 'First Computer' though, no monitor, no soundcard, integrated graphics ...

    Is it a computer you'd consider buying?

    The really worring thing is clueless people thinking i'll buy this for a Christmas present......

  • User profile image
    Massif

    For any American pondering the impact without context, Tesco is far and away the largest supermarket chain in the UK. (Far and away being used here to mean they have achieved the kind of dominance that will take a decade or so to erode, not 99.9% market share or anything.)

    Although I've seen PCs in all the large Tesco stores, I'm not sure I've ever seen anyone buy one.

  • User profile image
    Dr Herbie

    Massif wrote:
    For any American pondering the impact without context, Tesco is far and away the largest supermarket chain in the UK. (Far and away being used here to mean they have achieved the kind of dominance that will take a decade or so to erode, not 99.9% market share or anything.)

    Although I've seen PCs in all the large Tesco stores, I'm not sure I've ever seen anyone buy one.


    What's the statistic?  Isn't it something like £1 in every £7 spent in the UK is spent in Tesco?
    (Not that I ever believe statistics).

    Herbie

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    They'll need some kind of marketing push to really take off, but it's certainly a start. 

    I'd be willing to bet that if some deep pocketed venture capitalist decided to actively promote Ubuntu in places where they aren't preaching to the choir, they might get some better traction in the market.

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