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Why doesn't Microsoft buy SCO?

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  • User profile image
    DigitalDud

    The only good (beyond merely viable) *nix OS on the desktop today is OSX.  This being the fact that its the only one not missing fundamental technical features like say, how about an actual I/O model?  Plus its the only one that gets the "it just works!" factor to actually work, 99% of the time.  OSX is the only *nix OS that is truly user friendly, by a long shot.

  • User profile image
    Tom Servo

    Shining Arcanine wrote:
    
    I have tried Ubuntu before and it did not play nicely with Microsoft Virtual PC. Is it possible to do a dual-boot between Ubuntu and Windows XP? Also, I thought Ubuntu was Linux based and not Unix based. Can a Unix clone really as good as the real thing?

    If you want the real thing, go with Solaris. It's SVR4 and XPG4/6, and certified UNIX(tm). It also ships Gnome next to CDE. At least in the Solaris Nevada development builds, which are pretty stable, I might add.

    Shining Arcanine wrote:
    
    SunOS sparky 5.9 Generic_122300-12 sun4u sparc SUNW,Sun-Fire-V440

    That's Solaris 9 for SPARC processors.

    So yeah, if you want to continue with what you're used to, go with Solaris x86. Preferably, you should go with Solaris Nevada, which are the development version and technology testbed for what'll become Solaris 11. Don't be mistaken by "development version", even the bleeding edge Community Edition is pretty stable, but going with the Development Edition gets you the extra assurance.

    If you want Gnome 2.20, you need to go with Solaris Express CE snv_75 or wait for Solaris Express DE snv_80. All builds before snv_75 ship with the previous release.

    Another idea would be to wait for Project Indiana March release. But that project focuses on giving the Linux people a nice and easy entry in the Solaris world, as such it's bash, GNU userland and things like that. Though these things will be user controlled from within the installer, so you can switch to between GNU, SVR4, POSIX and whatever that other was at install time.

  • User profile image
    TimP

    DigitalDud wrote:
    OSX is the only *nix OS that is truly user friendly, by a long shot.


    A/UX is pretty user friendly on my Quadra 650. All the coziness of System 7 with SVR3 UNIX underneath. Smiley

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    creditcard wrote:
    Yes, Virtual PC is a giant crap. If you go on their website and look up supported guest OSes they don't even mention Linux once.


    Have you worked out why they made/bought Virtual PC yet? Surely they didn't just go to all of that effort to then go and release it for free? Here's a hint: All of Microsoft's OSes are supported by VPC.

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    creditcard wrote:
    

    Oh, and I had 24-bit color on my machine in 1997. Wonder why Virtual PC stuggles with it.


    Because 24-bit video modes are a performance nightmare? It's going to be worse still if you're having to emulate it too. The real question is why anyone wants to use a 24-bit display rather than a much more performant 32-bit one anyway.

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    creditcard wrote:
    
    Somehow I don't think that's the reason, it has more to do with the fact that VPC is a immature product compared to the competition.


    You're aware that it predates VMWare, right?

    But, regardless of virtualisation or not, it's really, really dumb of Linux to still be defaulting to a display mode that is incredibly slow on most graphics cards (even those of the Win 95 era). That just makes no sense at all.

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    If MS bought SCO, I can't imagine how much money they have to put into the law suit. "MS reign of Terror Obtaining SCO". It is the same as why MS only bought 22% of stock when Apple was almost gone for good.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    creditcard wrote:
    
    evildictaitor wrote:
    
    creditcard wrote:
    Yes, Virtual PC is a giant crap. If you go on their website and look up supported guest OSes they don't even mention Linux once.


    Have you worked out why they made/bought Virtual PC yet? Here's a hint: All of Microsoft's OSes are supported by VPC.


    Well guess what? All of Microsoft's OSes are supported by pretty much all mainstream VMs (VMWare, VirtualBox, Xen) and with even better support then with Virtual PC (OMG 24-bits color!). Even for just virtualization for Microsoft operating systems Virtual PC is a cripple.


    VPC was made to allow faster debugging of Windows OSes internally. The fact that it could be extended to other operating systems is more of a side-feature.

    And you all thought it was a benevolent exercise in giving you free software.

    The reason it doesn't support Linux is because Linux uses a couple of different options that Microsoft OSes don't support, and VPC was custom tailored to running MSOSes for this reason.

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    creditcard wrote:
    
    That's a bunch of patent nonsense. In both Windows and Linux colors are actually 24-bits, 8 for Red, 8 for Blue, and 8 Green. Since most systems process data in 32-bits, The last 8 bits of pixel information are just garbage data (or in image formats, the alpha channel). This is true for both Linux and Windows, just Windows advertises a 32-bit color depth on the Control Panel, which is pretty much a lie.


    Talking of patent nonsense, you are aware that most video cards and display adapters don't use sequential RGBX RGBX DWORD format but use 3 channel RRRRRRR .... GGGGG .... BBBBB... format, right?

  • User profile image
    Xaero_​Vincent

    AndyC wrote:
    You're aware that it predates VMWare, right?

    But, regardless of virtualisation or not, it's really, really dumb of Linux to still be defaulting to a display mode that is incredibly slow on most graphics cards (even those of the Win 95 era). That just makes no sense at all.


    It doesn't.

    As long as the video card and driver support 32 bit video mode, Xserver supports 24 bit color with the extra byte to align the color channels to 4 byte increments in memory, which is more efficent and therefore faster.

    Xserver refers both 24 and 32 bit as 24 bit color depth.

    The "xdpyinfo" command provides some information about the color depths supported by Xserver and your video card.

  • User profile image
    PaoloM

    creditcard wrote:
    AndyC said:
    creditcard wrote:

    Somehow I don't think that's the reason, it has more to do with the fact that VPC is a immature product compared to the competition.


    You're aware that it predates VMWare, right?

    But, regardless of virtualisation or not, it's really, really dumb of Linux to still be defaulting to a display mode that is incredibly slow on most graphics cards (even those of the Win 95 era). That just makes no sense at all.


    That's a bunch of patent nonsense. In both Windows and Linux colors are actually 24-bits, 8 for Red, 8 for Blue, and 8 Green. Since most systems process data in 32-bits, The last 8 bits of pixel information are just garbage data (or in image formats, the alpha channel). This is true for both Linux and Windows, just Windows advertises a 32-bit color depth on the Control Panel, which is pretty much a lie.
    No, you are wrong.

  • User profile image
    PaoloM

    There it goes, Safari barfs again Smiley

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    PaoloM wrote:
    There it goes, Safari barfs again Smiley


    Until you figure out the secret trick...  I can post from Safari Wink

    (hint...  debug menu)

  • User profile image
    PaoloM

    CannotResolveSymbol wrote:
    PaoloM wrote:
    There it goes, Safari barfs again


    Until you figure out the secret trick...  I can post from Safari

    (hint...  debug menu)
    Yeah, I knew about that. I didn't enable it after reinstalling Leopard...

    That for some reason, tonight really dislikes my network, as it drops out regularly every 5 minutes.

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    creditcard wrote:
    
    That's a bunch of patent nonsense. In both Windows and Linux colors are actually 24-bits, 8 for Red, 8 for Blue, and 8 Green. Since most systems process data in 32-bits, The last 8 bits of pixel information are just garbage data (or in image formats, the alpha channel). This is true for both Linux and Windows, just Windows advertises a 32-bit color depth on the Control Panel, which is pretty much a lie.


    And Virtual PC supports those 32-bit modes without any difficulty whatsoever. The only one it doesn't support is a genuine 24-bit graphics mode and that's what Linux is trying to use on it.

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    creditcard wrote:
    
    Three major kernel revisions later and the "bug" still hasn't be fixed. I think it's safe to assume that Generic Forum Imagethe kernel developers don't consider it to be a bug, or if they do, it's a very very low priority


    And that's why Linux doesn't have a big market-share, right there.

    If Linux developers started to realise that actually users having a good experience is much more important than silly long-term grudges they might hold, or stop bickering about whether Linux ought to even allow programs not released under the GPL, they might actually get some users.

    They should get their act together and put in a single line at the top of their kernel:

    if(VPC) then { don't use 24-bit color }


    And until they do, normal users who just want their computer to work and who might want to try out that new and fangled "Linux thing" will be absolutely sure to not touch it if it doesn't just work.

  • User profile image
    TimP

    The problem is that Microsoft does not emulate the S3 Trio properly. The hardware S3 Trio supports 24-bit color, VPC tells Linux it has an S3 Trio, so Linux assumes it has 24-bit support, and you're blaming this problem on Linux? If you don't or can't emulate a video card properly, just make your own. VMware uses their own SVGA adapter that doesn't exist in any hardware form, yet Linux supports it out of the box.

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    TimP wrote:
    

    The problem is that Microsoft does not emulate the S3 Trio properly. The hardware S3 Trio supports 24-bit color, VPC tells Linux it has an S3 Trio, so Linux assumes it has 24-bit support, and you're blaming this problem on Linux? If you don't or can't emulate a video card properly, just make your own. VMware uses their own SVGA adapter that doesn't exist in any hardware form, yet Linux supports it out of the box.


    It's clearly VPC who is at fault fundamentally here, but if what creditcard says is correct about the ease with which this could be fixed inside Linux, to not do so because it's "not important", "we don't like Microsoft" or "Linux should be emulating Windows! Not other way roundz!" shows a level of arrogance by the Linux developers in this respect.

    If there is a simple solution which would make their user's life much easier and they are not taking it on grounds of petty grudges against Microsoft, then it is unsurprising that many people choose not to turn to Linux.

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