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What can we ask from Windows "Longhorn Server" 2006

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  • User profile image
    Natty Gur

    I'm taking diffrent course. As an enterprise guy how spend time creating SOS (system of system) I would like to see more enterprise abilities such as application server (that our new Java brothers got). from enterprise point of view windows server dont help me convince customers to use MS as thier core enterprise servers.

  • User profile image
    SMac

    Systems of systems are very "hot" right now -- My take -- and someone please correct me if I'm wrong -- is that my understanding is that when talking about architecting enterprise applications in .Net is that it is important to realize that IIS does fulfill the role of an application server. You can expose web services that run on IIS that utilize the .Net framework to perform your business logic.


    One of the problem areas in our development in Java/J2EE is the integration of products between different vendors -- we might have an app server from Company S, IDE/Tools from Vendor B, Data tier from Company O, all running on the (corporate mandated) Company M's Operating system... and we run into trouble..

    What's nice about .Net is that the the data tier, the middle tier, as well as the presentation tier (both web and winforms based) are all provided by one vendor, Company M, also builds the development environment.. and the server...

    What's also really nice is that since that MS saying that they "produce and eat their own dogfood" they are spending their money to come up with good solutions to common problems -- and thankfully they release these as patterns and practices available on the MSDN website.

    These patterns and practices provide some very good "blocks" which are used to architect enterprise apps -- all for free... in another world, these types of things usually are provided by (high priced) consultants or in-house development...


     

  • User profile image
    smartguy

    Karim wrote:
    TheTodd wrote:
    Manip wrote: <Directory C:\Windows>
      Order deny, allow
      Deny from all
    </Directory>

    That is all you have to write to block access to windows with apache. No XML, nice simple... I can explain that to anyone in 1min and can write it in even less time. XML == Evil!

    [snip]


    Can you not see that what you wrote is XML?



    You forgot to use the closing </irony> tag.  LOL


    lol. Found this funny.
    <> open </> close <?> wtf
    learn that in html. Didnt know it went on to xml. Learn something new everyday. Smiley

  • User profile image
    mindragon

    My top 10...

    1) Make Clustering even better and less painful than it already is. I would call Windows 2003 Enterprise cluster a v0.8 technology (2000 was 0.5 and NT was 0.1). I just had to muck around with a Win2k3 cluster for two hours today (better than eight hours on Win2k but still).

    2) For God's sake, turn on Video Acceleration to max. Why on earth would you default it to disabled? Nvidia MX400 has lots of nifty accelleration features that make scrolling through 50 page Clustering docs less painful.

    3) Make SUS a part of the package. Turn on SUS services by default. Do a bitorrent style distribution system of updates. And for gods sake, include Office and any other desktop update into the package. Make it automatic. Oh yeah, on an automatic reboot...SAVE EVERY DOCUMENT!! The desktop should be restored exactly the way the user left it.

    4) Make stupid pop up boxes go away. For instance, remote desktop connection when you select "close group" it is annoying to have to go to each one and click "OK" to "This will disconnect your session" ... duh.

    5) If there are two lame Admins on Remote Desktop, and they both disconnected and the sessions are locked, there has to be an easier way for a domain admin to kill those two sessions.

    6) Support the 15% of the people in the world that are left handed. End the right click left click right click nightmare somehow. This includes on the login screen (where there is only one left handed user using the entire machine) on Remote Desktop (after they type their name, you should *know* they are left handed) and on any other login screen that might be invented in the future.

    7) Smart monitoring of resources. If the hard drive is getting full, zap the crud that should be zapped (temporary internet files...temp...etc) and make a centralized alerting system. Even if it's MOM-lite, build it in. If the processor or RAM is maxxing out regularly, there should be a daily status report that is sent to the admin or d/l of the box. This includes what critical events happened, what warning events happened and so on. Any Service that can be bolted into this MOM-lite system should also be able to add their reports to it (web sites, etc.)

    8) Make website reporting easier. I've gone through 5 or 6 crappy website reporting software and still can't find one that does what I want. There should be included with the FrontPage extensions a website status report that discusses who visited the website, the amount of bandwidth they used and so on. There should be a parent report that describes the bandwidth, disk space usage of all the websites on the box. If the website needs to be migrated to another box on the domain, there should be an easy to use migration tool.

    9) Exchange 2003 is way bulky. Slim it down. Look at www.altn.com for examples of admin friendly groupware software.

    10) Make malware, spyware, virus, worms, trojans, hacks, exploits and any other crappy event easier to detect, track and eliminate. Even better -- a way to trace to the source and block them out automatically somehow.

  • User profile image
    TheTodd

    mindragon wrote:

    3) Make SUS a part of the package. Turn on SUS services by default. Do a bitorrent style distribution system of updates. And for gods sake, include Office and any other desktop update into the package. Make it automatic. Oh yeah, on an automatic reboot...SAVE EVERY DOCUMENT!! The desktop should be restored exactly the way the user left it.



    I do not think I could agree with this point more.

  • User profile image
    warren

    mindragon wrote:
    My top 10...
    2) For God's sake, turn on Video Acceleration to max. Why on earth would you default it to disabled? Nvidia MX400 has lots of nifty accelleration features that make scrolling through 50 page Clustering docs less painful.


    Server-side video acceleration shouldn't be something you need to rely.  Use your workstation for tasks that benefit from hardware acceleration.

    mindragon wrote:
    5) If there are two lame Admins on Remote Desktop, and they both disconnected and the sessions are locked, there has to be an easier way for a domain admin to kill those two sessions.


    This is available already -- it's called Terminal Services Manager.  You can use it to remotely disconnect and log out users from Remote Desktop sessions.

    Also, you can reconfigure Terminal Services to end sessions after a certain amount of time; Look in Administrative Tools -> Terminal Services Configuration -> Connections -> RDP-Tcp (properties) -> Sessions tab.  As suggested by the UI, you can also configure these settings on a per-user basis.

  • User profile image
    mindragon

    Warren,

    In a fantasy world, everything works great. However, there are real world situations when acceleration should be left on by default. For instance, if you are in a datacenter (which is usually not where I put my workstation) and you're trying to get clustering to work again, it would be a pain in the a$$ to walk back and forth between the datacenter and the workstation just to have a better scroll rate. In any case, there is no performance hit by having it on. There is a significant performance hit by having it disabled. And it's not like anyone is using Trident or Tseng Labs cards anymore...

    As far as the Terminal Services Manager, there is another great scenario where this doesn't work. Again, let's say you have a datacenter. The terminal server that is there is the only one accessible to the outside world. It's maxxed out. Now how do you kick the other two people off without having to drive 75 miles?

    Just because it works great in theory, doesn't mean that it works great in the real world where business managers reign.

    Mind Dragon

  • User profile image
    warren

    mindragon wrote:

    In a fantasy world, everything works great. However, there are real world situations when acceleration should be left on by default. For instance, if you are in a datacenter (which is usually not where I put my workstation) and you're trying to get clustering to work again, it would be a pain in the a$$ to walk back and forth between the datacenter and the workstation just to have a better scroll rate. In any case, there is no performance hit by having it on. There is a significant performance hit by having it disabled. And it's not like anyone is using Trident or Tseng Labs cards anymore...

    The reason video acceleration is disabled, is because it exposes additional direct-hardware access code paths in video drivers, that could potentially be crashy.  Most production Windows Server 2003 installations are going to be installed in "light-out" situations where the machine is not used at the local console -- think web farms here; does video acceleration really need to be enabled on these machines?  Things like Audio, WIA, CD burning, etc. are also disabled by default for the same reason:  less complexity = more stability.

    mindragon wrote:
    As far as the Terminal Services Manager, there is another great scenario where this doesn't work. Again, let's say you have a datacenter. The terminal server that is there is the only one accessible to the outside world. It's maxxed out. Now how do you kick the other two people off without having to drive 75 miles?

    This is an issue of horrifically poor configuration on YOUR part, and is NOT a failing of the operating system.

    First of all, Terminal Services gives you all the configuration power you need to prevent situations like the above from happening.  Did you intentionally ignore this so that you could try and build an argument?  Should I expect to hear you complaining soon about how IIS is "crippled" in a default install because you have to change the configuration a bit in order to get things to work?


    Second, Terminal Services shouldn't be your "only way in" from the outside world.  Use Remote Access (ie. a VPN or dial-up connection) for this purpose -- with a proper configuration, you will be able to access and administer any machine on your network (via Terminal Services or MMC) without having to go through Terminal Services to do so.


    Third, Terminal Services Manager lets you connect to *any* machine running TS on your network.  You don't need to use it locally, and indeed, the left-hand pane is automatically populated by the list of available TS machines, and you can build a list of "Favorites" as well.  Use this capability in conjunction with a Remote Access connection to boot users off of a "full" machine.


    Windows Server 2003 comes with a lot of good tools.  Learn them, love them, and most importantly, USE them.

  • User profile image
    Jeremy W

    I guess we're a touch spoiled in this, but we got sick of Terminal Services, RAS'ing in and VPN (for the various servers), not to mention IP-KVM for others.

    So, we set-up a small CITRIX farm. Published all the apps we needed to the farm, and now we can do all the work we need from anywhere. No clients. No software. No connection settings.

    Oh, and no driving 75 miles, thanks to all the servers being Dell and having the management apps (we can gracefully reboot, or just do a hard reboot if they're frozen).

  • User profile image
    Hamled

    I know this is a bit late but...

    Apache is not just a "hobby product" with thousands of developers each working on making it their own personal application. It seems to me that BOFH is simply going based on the supposed situations of all Open Source projects. Apache does infact have an organization that funds it, can represent it legally, and provides the organization for it's development. The Apache Foundation (formerly the Apache Group) was created because apache is one of the core applications for most linux servers, and requires stability that can't be provided by an ever shifting group of developers with little organization.

    That said, I don't have much to recommend for Windows Server 2006 because I'm more of a developer than an administrator, and can't afford Windows Server Tongue Out

  • User profile image
    dhavalhirdh​av

    well, just a my little words..


    Linux server is better in performance because most of the Linux server runs on console.. just run Linux in GUI mode i.e. XWindows, and then run it as a Server and see the performance, performance will be worst then Windows Server. so what I would like to see in Windows Server is ability to run server on Console mode as well and in GUI mode as well. Windows Longhorn Command Shell is there, but its like a bash shell on XWindows, but I would like a complete console based solution, no GUI, that will be really cool for Windows Server.

  • User profile image
    prog_dotnet

    sql 2000 is delivered with books online, a huge resource for the dba.
    There should be a books online look alike included with the longhorn product also..



     

  • User profile image
    Shining Arcanine

    Manip wrote:
    I love how you back-peddle out of your entire 'windows is faster than linux, look at this' rubbish.

    Also, Linux isn't a desktop system and we are not discussing desktops... You might not have a GUI but that reduces hardware costs / usage.


    Actually, after a few comments, it is easy to see that you are irrational and further dialogue with you is not worth my time.

  • User profile image
    Hamled

    dhavalhirdhav wrote:

    Linux server is better in performance because most of the Linux server runs on console.. just run Linux in GUI mode i.e. XWindows, and then run it as a Server and see the performance, performance will be worst then Windows Server. so what I would like to see in Windows Server is ability to run server on Console mode as well and in GUI mode as well. Windows Longhorn Command Shell is there, but its like a bash shell on XWindows, but I would like a complete console based solution, no GUI, that will be really cool for Windows Server.


    This would probably be too hard to impliment.. I don't know for sure, but I'd say the GUI is too central to the nt kernel to be eliminated.

    In addition to that, it's a big jump. Moving from Console to GUI isn't nearly as hard because all you have to do is write a GUI interface and you can use the already written application. Almost all of the applications Microsoft has created for windows are GUI-based, as well as most of the applications created by third parties. In Linux, when X was implimented, no one _had_ to create a new application that had a GUI, as the console was still available, unfortunately in Windows if one were to go the other way around, almost all of the applications would have to be rewritten. If the GUI was still available to run applications that weren't ported, the benefits of having console-only would be negated.

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