Coffeehouse Thread

11 posts

Come on Microsoft people. Let's see your bookshelves!

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    lars

    Created a new thread for this question that came up in the thread "Good books for learning to program".

    Jaz wrote:
    Just wondering.  What do the MS guys have on their bookshelves, programming related and well maybe some fiction?
    Excellent question! Come on MS people. Let's see your bookshelves! Why not post a picture of it so we can see which O'reilly books you're secretly reading.

    How is Microsoft related to Microsoft Press? Does every employee get a set of books - do you just request them? Or do you have to open your wallet like the rest of us?

    /Lars.

  • User profile image
    sbc

    Perhaps they have books on Dreamweaver MX and Fireworks? Flash wouldn't be out of the question (as I have seen some Microsoft pages use flash)

  • User profile image
    spod

    I'm not in the office at the moment, but i'
    ll write a full list when i'm next in. Quid pro quo though lars, you should tell us what's on yours...always good to spot a new book to read etc...

    There are two constants on nearly every developers  bookshelf at ms in my experience:

    some version of programming pearls by jon bentley ( this is one of the best cs books ever though imo )

    the 3 volume set of knuth's algorithm books ( the ones using MIX etc ). Normally unopened Smiley


  • User profile image
    Knute

    Plus there is the library at MS so you don't always have to purchase the book, you can just borrow it from the vast array of technical books Wink

    ~ Knute

  • User profile image
    miies

    spod wrote:

    Quid pro quo though lars, you should tell us what's on yours...always good to spot a new book to read etc...


    If that's an invitation, I'll add my humble collection to the thread:

    Joe Casad - Teach Yourself TCP/IP in 24 Hours
    ISBN: 0672325659

    Edward Yourdon - Structured Analysis
    (Out of print)

    Laura Lemay - Creating Commercial Web Pages
    ASIN: 1575211262

    Linus Torvalds - Just for fun
    ISBN: 0066620724

    Bill Gates - Business @ the Speed of Thought
    ISBN: 0446675962

    ..and a whole bunch of Dutch books. I've just ordered this:

    Bob Beauchemin, and others - First Look at Microsoft SQL Server "Yukon" Beta for Developers
    ISBN: 0321180593

  • User profile image
    Manip

    Don't want to look up the ISBN, sorry. Smiley

    MS® Visual Basic 5.0 Programmers Guide
    MS® Enterprise Development using Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0
    MS® Windows Architecture for Development training
    Visual Basic 6 Complete
    Visual Basic in easy steps
    Windows Visual Basic Game Programming with Visual Basic and DirectX

    Computing
    Computer Science Third Edition
    Operating System Concepts
    Communications Networking
    Upgrading and fixing PC's for dummies

    Hacking Linux Exposed (Second Edition)
    Unix for Dummies

    Turbo Perl Precisely
    Java in a nutshell

    C++ for Programmers
    idiot's guide to C++
    C++ for dummies
    Game Programming all in one
    Game Programming
    teach yourself C++ in 21days

    I have not listed my fictional and non-computing books.. or ebooks. Wink

  • User profile image
    BanjoFrog

    I read O'Riley books as well as my MS Press books.  Our product groups have to pay for MS Press, though we do get a decent discount. 

    The great thing about working for MS is that whatever books/materials we need to do a better job, they supply for us.

    I'm currently re-reading the 2nd edition of "Writing Secure Code", and refreshing my PERL knowledge with the camel book.  Oh yeah... and a biography of bluegrass pioneer Bill Monroe Smiley

  • User profile image
    AdamKinney

    This is about the Microsoft employee's bookshelf I have seen…

    http://www.sellsbrothers.com/spout/#What_Would_You_Save_If_Your_House_Was_On_Fire

  • User profile image
    lars

    Well, fair enough. If I look at the bookshelf closest to me, the current "work set",  I'll find:

    Programming ADO.Net
     by Hundhausen & Borg /Wiley
    .Net Framework Security by LaMacchia, lange, Lyons, Martin, Price /Addison-Wesley
    Applied XML Programming for .Net by Esposito /MS Press
    Developing Web Applications with Visual Basic.Net and Visual C#.Net /MS Press
    ADO.Net Core reference by Sceppa /MS Press
    Programming Microsoft Windows with C# by Petzold /MS Press
    Applied Microsoft .Net Framework Programming by Richter /MS Press
    Inside Visual Studio .Net 2003 by Johnson, Skibo & Young. /MS Press
    Building Web solutions with ASP.Net and ADO.Net by Esposito /MS Press
    ADO.Net Step by Step by Riordan /MS Press
    Javascript by Flanagan / O'reilly
    Essential COM by Don Box/ Addison-Wesley
    Inside Windows 2000 3ed, by Solomon /MS Press
    Microsoft Office 2003 Inside Out by Halvorson /MS Press.
    The Art of Deception by Mitnick / Wiley

    /Lars.

  • User profile image
    fryguybob

    The Art of Computer Programming I, II, and III.  They really are beautiful.
    Numerical Recipes in C. One of my favorites.
    Introduction to Algorithms by Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, and Stein.
    Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice by Foley, van Dam, Feiner, and Hughes.  I haven't looked at it since I had a class with it (come to think of it I don't recall looking at it much then).
    An Introduction to NURBS: with Historical Perspective by Rogers.  I wouldn't really recommend this one, but I couldn't really find any others that were concise enough for what I needed.

    And then there are the stacks of MSDN Magazine, Windows Developer's Journal, and Dr. Dobbs.  I use math books more then CS books though.  On the shelf are three different calculus books and a linear algebra book.

  • User profile image
    lars

    fryguybob wrote:
    Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice by Foley, van Dam, Feiner, and Hughes.  I haven't looked at it since I had a class with it (come to think of it I don't recall looking at it much then)


    Yet somehow it feels so good just to have a copy around. Just in case. And the pictures are pretty.

    Another one that I think is a feel-good-and-cozy kinda book is Introduction to Algorithms by Cormen, Leiserson & Rivest.

    /Lars.

Comments closed

Comments have been closed since this content was published more than 30 days ago, but if you'd like to continue the conversation, please create a new thread in our Forums, or Contact Us and let us know.