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In which language microsoft is developing longhorn?

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  • User profile image
    pwzeus

    Hi guys,

    Sorry for amature question but I really could not find it anywher
    on the net and then I thought this got to be the place where
    i can find the answer. I really need to know in which language
    longhorn has been written or in which environment?
    I need it for my reearch paper.

    Thanks
    Pz

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    As per usual, the majority of the code will be written in Microsoft's "interpretation" of C++

    Some of the legacy stuff was probably written in ISO C.

    From what I've seen, its still unclear with Longhorn will contain DotNet, but if it does, then its inevitable that "less essential" parts of the OS will have been written in CLR languages, C# and Managed C++ most likely.

    I wouldn't be surprised to see bits of Windows written in Objective-C or Delphi though Wink

  • User profile image
    pwzeus

    humm intresting thanks for the information
    so but another thing is longhorn asks for
    minimum 1 gb ram ....isnt it to much?

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    pwzeus wrote:
    humm intresting thanks for the information
    so but another thing is longhorn asks for
    minimum 1 gb ram ....isnt it to much?

    Where did you read that?

    Longhorn hasn't been released yet, and you cannot measure performance of the released product based on pre-alpha builds. Only when Longhorn goes gold will we know for certain the hardware it requires.

  • User profile image
    littleguru

    I don't think that this is true. I guess 512 will be the minimum. But if you want to see the 3D UI you will probably need more ram, yeah!

  • User profile image
    pwzeus

    4. What is the System Requirement for Longhorn?

    At the time of beta 1, Longhorn requires 2.0 GHz processor and 1 GB RAM, in addition to ton of GB of hard drive space.

    http://www.c-sharpcorner.com/Longhorn/Longhorn/LonghornIntroduction.asp

    i read it there on that website. May be i interprited it wrong
    or whatever but yeh i agree for heavy 3d graphics it will need
    more ram , cant run on 512.

  • User profile image
    Cider

    That article was written in 2003.  Lots have changed in the Longhorn world since, not least the fact that since then they restarted Longhorn from Windows 2003 as the base (possibly 2003 SP1 as base, its a little hazy there...)

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Practically all the PCs currently on sale at PCWorld and TheComputerStore that are mid-range or higher all have a gig of ram and a 3.0Ghz CPU anyway. In a years time they'll all have 2 gigs of ram.

    When the first Doom3 alphas were leaked/released, people were shocked at the steep requirements, but months past and newer hardware came out to accomodate this.

    One good thing about Longhorn is that the lower-end and no-name periphial and component mfgs are going to go out of business (woo! no more BSODs)

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    W3bbo wrote:
    Practically all the PCs currently on sale at PCWorld and TheComputerStore that are mid-range or higher all have a gig of ram and a 3.0Ghz CPU anyway. In a years time they'll all have 2 gigs of ram.

    Most PCs sold here have 512MB of RAM, but I think there's still a fair number sold with just 256MB of RAM. I've never seen a consumer-oriented machine on sale with 1GB RAM by default.

  • User profile image
    JDanielSmith

    Beer28 wrote:
    I don't know of any operating system besides lookingglass3d window manager, which isn't really an operating system but a window manager and X server variation, that is partly written in managed code.

    All OS's that I know of are C with some C++ and a very small part of platform specific stuff in asm




    I believe the entire "10 foot" UI of XP Media Center Edition is written in managed code (C# would be my guess as MC++ is so gnarly).

    Given that one of the persistent rumors is that Longhorn will merge all the XP variants (MCE, Tablet, 64bit, etc.), it's likely at least a portion of the OS will be managed.

    But it really depends on how you define "Operating System".  It it (most) everything that comes on the Windows CD (probalby DVD for Longhorn)?  Is it whatever comes from Microsoft that is pre-installed on a new computer? Or is it just the absolute bare essentials required to support the Win32 API?  If you go with the strict CS definition, then even if the Shell probably wouldn't count.

    I'd bet lots of good money that Microsoft will ship managed code as part of the Longhorn deliverable.  If nothing else, I'm sure the .NET framework will be installed with the OS and not be an optional component.

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    Indigo is written predominantly in C#. Various bits of Avalon are in some variant of managed code too, again I suspect it's C#, but it could be managed C++.

    I believe it's already been stated that .NET will be included in Longhorn. Since it's already part of Server 2003 and required for IIS, which will presumably still be in the 'pro' version, I don't see how they can leave it out.

  • User profile image
    pwzeus

    Hey , what do u mean they ahve restarted longhorn
    from windows 2003 as the base ?


  • User profile image
    Larry​Osterman

    W3bbo wrote:
    As per usual, the majority of the code will be written in Microsoft's "interpretation" of C++




    "Interpretation"?  Why is Microsoft's C++ compiler any more non-standard than anyone else's C++ compiler?

    But almost all of Windows is either C or C++.  There's a bunch of managed code there as well, both C# and managec C++, fwiw.

  • User profile image
    harumscarum

    I figured it would all be in vbscript in asp

  • User profile image
    Minh

    I heard it's written in QuickBasic. I've downloaded the source in Longhorn.bas. I will make it available if you want it.

    androidi wrote:

    Better question is, is the .NET somehow more closely tied to Longhorn than what it is in XP? Hard to say, but you can be sure that the framework is always in the memory - most likely even when the user has not even logged in yet.

    Isn't the WinFX layer written in managed code?


  • User profile image
    sgarrette

    Most Operating Systems are done in C or C++.  I do believe i heard MS-DOS was written in Basic though.  I do not have an idea if thats true or not.

  • User profile image
    msemack

    Well, Longhorn is a continuation of the existing Windows XP/2003 codebase.

    The kernel-mode bits of Windows are mostly written in C.  There is a little bit of x86 assembly language for some platform-specific things.

    The user-mode things are mostly C with a bit of C++ here and there.

    Longhorn is adding some managed code to the system.  Presumably, this will be written in C#.

    Regarding MS-DOS:  From my understanding, it was written almost exclusively in x86 assembly language.

  • User profile image
    androidi

    Well this is just my educated guess. In Longhorn, if it's not low level (You can't "see" it) - it's written in managed code. It doesn't really matter whether the code was written in managed C++ C# or VB as the executable will be quite the same. For parts where interacting with driver/kernel directly is not required, I think the most common language will be C#. Avalon, Indigo etc - the new things will be definetely 90+% C#. The legacy stuff where existing code from Win2003/XP etc is used, is still C++.

    I wonder if there is few/a lot of existing C/C++ codebases they have decided to "/switch / port" to managed C++ though - like the Quake 2 example.


    w3bbo: "From what I've seen, its still unclear with Longhorn will contain DotNet"

    Better question is, is the .NET somehow more closely tied to Longhorn than what it is in XP? Hard to say, but you can be sure that the framework is always in the memory - most likely even when the user has not even logged in yet.

    Beer28: "I don't know of any operating system".."that is partly written in managed code."

    I think this depends on what pwzeus meant by "Longhorn". For me Longhorn is the stuff that we do not have in XP/2003 currently. For the _new_ parts that will be the Longhorn experience it just makes no sense to use unmanaged code. But if we talk about windows in general, I would believe that in Longhorn the majority of code overall is still inherited from previous Windoses and what parts of that is /switched to managed is uncertain - not many I would presume.

    pwzeus: "or in which environment"

    Based on what you can see in videos, blogs etc - I believe that different MS devs get to use their favourite coding environment where it is not required that everyone uses a particular one for some technical reason.

    So the answer would be most certainly atleast Emacs and Visual Studio.

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