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Consortium plans new Digital Ecosystem

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  • User profile image
    Ray7

    A new consortium that consists of Everyone minus Apple, is planning to launch a new digital content ecosystem, that will allow consumers to access and play back purchased media from anywhere in the world, on any compatibe device.

    A spokesbod had this to say about Digital Entertainment Content Ecosystem, which will be formally announced at CES early next year:

    Reuters said:

    "We will be developing a ... specification that services and device makers can license. They can use the logo to associate their device, knowing that when the consumer goes to buy the content, they know it will play," Singer said.

    The new digital framework would turn Apple Inc's "closed" iTunes model on its head, Singer said.

    "This is very different from the Apple ecosystem," he said. "We encourage Apple to join the consortium. We don't ever anticipate Apple going away or this consortium replacing it." 



    More at Reuters

    Okay, let's call it what it is; it's a DRM system. Another one, but with a few lessons learned from the road kill that came before it.

    To begin with, don't tell folk it's DRM because that is not good marketing. At the same time, don't try to sell DRM as something advantageous to the consumer; the consumer wasn't born yesterday.

    What the consortium has done, is come up with a DRM concept that offers a file locker that can be played on any device. I have always said that the rights to the content/software should be attached to the individual, not the machine. All that matters is that you have paid for it; after that it should be yours to play anywhere and at anytime.

    Will it work? If it is non-intrusive, then yes. I just doubt that it will be. If it's another case of checking with the server before stuff is played, then consumers will be pretty hacked off if the server is unavailable when they have folk round for dinner and a chat. (Everyone likes background music, to fill in the uncomfortable silence when grandad wanders downstairs without his clothes.)

    Another point has been made by one or two people on Engadget. If this is all about trying to break Apple's lock on the content market, then it is doomed to failure,  'Breaking the competition' never generates the determination or  sense of co-operation required to pull off something this ambitious.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    This makes no sense when major music stores like Amazon, Zune, and hell even a big part of iTunes is now DRM free.

  • User profile image
    Ray7

    Bass said:
    This makes no sense when major music stores like Amazon, Zune, and hell even a big part of iTunes is now DRM free.
    Actually, only a small percentage of music on iTunes is DRM free,  (I am not sure if this is down to Apple or the record companies.) but I take your point.

    The content distributors want DRM to work. But again, I'm not sure that the folk who make it (film makers, musicians) want it at all.

    I was disappointed to see MS involved with this shady lot; disappointed, but not completely surprised.

  • User profile image
    giovanni

    Ray7 said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*
    Actually, only a small percentage of music on iTunes is DRM free,  (I am not sure if this is down to Apple or the record companies.) but I take your point.

    The content distributors want DRM to work. But again, I'm not sure that the folk who make it (film makers, musicians) want it at all.

    I was disappointed to see MS involved with this shady lot; disappointed, but not completely surprised.
    Not 100% of the content today is DRM free. More and more contnt will, but some will always be DRM protected (movies have a long way to go for example, rented music makes sense only with some sort of DRM). If the system is not excessively intrusive and it will guarantee that purchased content will still live for many years (despite the fact that digital stores might close down), then why not?

  • User profile image
    matthews

    Well designed and implemented DRM is good for content producers, which in turn is good for consumers as it allows them to continue getting new content. Poorly designed and implemented DRM is still bad, but I think the people who think all DRM is bad no matter what are a little off their rocker.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    matthews said:
    Well designed and implemented DRM is good for content producers, which in turn is good for consumers as it allows them to continue getting new content. Poorly designed and implemented DRM is still bad, but I think the people who think all DRM is bad no matter what are a little off their rocker.
    No, DRM is bad "no matter what" because it's cryptographically inherently flawed since (in the Alice/Bob/Charlie scenario) Bob is Charlie.

  • User profile image
    Bas

    Bass said:
    This makes no sense when major music stores like Amazon, Zune, and hell even a big part of iTunes is now DRM free.
    This makes no sense when major music stores like Amazon, Zune, and hell even a big part of iTunes is now DRM free.


    And, for the most part, only available in the US. These guys apparently operate worldwide. That's an easy choice to make.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    Bas said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*


    And, for the most part, only available in the US. These guys apparently operate worldwide. That's an easy choice to make.
    There is nothing but barbarians and loud French people with bad hair outside of the United States.

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