Coffeehouse Thread

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Microsoft.com

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  • User profile image
    Pace

    I wonder what MS used to make its website... personally I think its probably the most comprehensive site on the net, so do you think they used Dreamweaver or Frontpage? =p

  • User profile image
    Dr. Shim

    notepad.exe

    Just kidding. They probably used DEBUG to directly insert characters into memory then save that data to their hard drives.

  • User profile image
    harumscarum

    I thought there was an aricle somewhere about the developers and the architecture of it. I may be wrong but I thought I read that a lot of it is built on web services.

  • User profile image
    lenn

    Its all custom development.  They use VS.NET and Visual InterDev.

  • User profile image
    rhm

    lenn wrote:
    Its all custom development.  They use VS.NET and Visual InterDev.


    Content Management Server wasn't up to the job then?

  • User profile image
    sbc

    lenn wrote:
    Its all custom development.  They use VS.NET and Visual InterDev.

    Still use InterDev? There were two version's weren't there (1.0 and 6.0)?

  • User profile image
    Dr. Shim

    lenn wrote:
    Its all custom development.  They use VS.NET and Visual InterDev.


    Oh, yeah. That works too I guess. Smiley

  • User profile image
    Brett​Nordquist

    I hadn't been to Microsoft.com for so long I was shocked to see such large graphics. Looks a lot better than what I remember. I'm surprised I seldom ever visit Microsoft.com given the number of MS products I use. I never really go there for anything other than Windows Update.

  • User profile image
    stephbu

    rhm wrote:
    lenn wrote: Its all custom development.  They use VS.NET and Visual InterDev.


    Content Management Server wasn't up to the job then?


    Microsoft.com is possibly one of the largest corporate sites in the world, with several million documents and downloads on offer in pretty much every language supported by Windows. 

    It represents a global federation of product, technology and marketing groups using a wide variety of Microsoft Enterprise technologies.  Pretty much all of the site is built using Managed Code of some variety or other.

    The Homepage and most of the top tiers of site are powered by various versions of a system called MNP - a Web UI framework built on an ASP.NET 1.1 page handler, a slew of custom .NET Applications for systems like profile management, and content from file and content management systems.

    The sheer age of the site means there is a wide spread of technology in use - some is bleeding edge, some trailing edge.

    We use a wide variety of content systems ranging from filesystem, simple SQL databases, customized CMS & Office installations, to complex XML document-set publishing pipelines such as MSDN's MTPS. 

    ASP.NET 2.0/Yukon is core of our leading edge for projects such as MSDN's Whidbey Development Center.  On the trailing edge is legacy content in the shape of ASP pages built in Visual Interdev.

    The volume of legacy ASP pages is declining, but our 7 year+ commitment to product content often means it is more practical to keep the legacy content alive than perform costly migration to newer systems.

    I have the pleasure of building infrastructure in the MSCOM group. Its sheer scale brings different engineering challenges. Luckily I work with some of the most skilled people in the web industry to make it happen.

  • User profile image
    Stitch 2.0

    Well, thanks for the inside!
    That was pretty interesting.

  • User profile image
    stephbu

    harumscarum wrote:
    I thought there was an aricle somewhere about the developers and the architecture of it. I may be wrong but I thought I read that a lot of it is built on web services.


    Many of our infrastructure pieces communicate using XML Web Services, WSE.

    We also dog-food most of the Microsoft Enterprise technologies.

  • User profile image
    stephbu

    harumscarum wrote:
    I thought there was an aricle somewhere about the developers and the architecture of it.


    From the web archive...

    http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.microsoft.com/backstage">http://www.microsoft.com/backstage">http://web.archive.org/web/*/http://www.microsoft.com/backstage

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    I heard somewhere that Microsoft's web site design and graphic art division work almost exclusivly on Apple PowerMacs running Adobe's Illustrator and Photoshop.

    ...Rather than Dells running Microsoft PhotoDraw or MSPaint Wink

    Can you shed some light on this rumour? ktnxbye Smiley

  • User profile image
    lenn

    I can assure you that our in-house graphic designers work on PCs using apps like Photoshop. 

  • User profile image
    jsrfc58

    stephbu wrote:


    Microsoft.com is possibly one of the largest corporate sites in the world, with several million documents and downloads on offer in pretty much every language supported by Windows. 


    Makes my day brighter.  I only have to maintain and keep track of a couple thousand web pages on our intranet sites.

  • User profile image
    littleguru

    W3bbo wrote:
    I heard somewhere that Microsoft's web site design and graphic art division work almost exclusivly on Apple PowerMacs running Adobe's Illustrator and Photoshop.

    ...Rather than Dells running Microsoft PhotoDraw or MSPaint

    Can you shed some light on this rumour? ktnxbye



    I guess the last time somebody touched the code in MSPaint was when it has been ported from 16 bit to 32 bit.

  • User profile image
    Steve411

    lenn wrote:
    I can assure you that our in-house graphic designers work on PCs using apps like Photoshop. 

    You never said if it was an Apple PowerMac or a Dell. Or an HP running XP.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Steve411 wrote:
    lenn wrote:I can assure you that our in-house graphic designers work on PCs using apps like Photoshop. 

    You never said if it was an Apple PowerMac or a Dell. Or an HP running XP.


    Right on... "PCs" could be interpreted as "PowerPC" Wink

    After all... aren't the "XBox NeXt" dev kits given out to game mfg's just Apple PowerMac G5's? Since the XBox NeXt uses an IBM PowerPC chip

    Oh the irony.

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