Coffeehouse Thread

62 posts

So in '7 ready for your desktop?

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  • Erisan

    Never. It works very well and it is definely the best Windows I have ever used. It just feels way too restrictive and I can't do my work with it so it's "no-go".

  • spivonious

    Wow!  I bet that runs pretty sluggishly!

  • arunpv

    I had bad experience with Windows 7- i installed it on my 9100 inspiron  Dell Laptop everything went well install SQL 2008 and VS 2008 works great and even faster. but, when i installed Cisco VPN Client i saw Blue screen of death. I had taken a system image before installing vpn client.


  • Bass

    arunpv said:
    I had bad experience with Windows 7- i installed it on my 9100 inspiron  Dell Laptop everything went well install SQL 2008 and VS 2008 works great and even faster. but, when i installed Cisco VPN Client i saw Blue screen of death. I had taken a system image before installing vpn client.


    Your avatar is hella creepy.

    But anyway it looks like my desktop is whats not ready for Windows 7, or something. Well the fact that I made a good faith attempt to install the thing only have to installer crash out near the beginning. Oh well.. it looks like I am "forced" to use Ubuntu and Windows XP for the foreseeable future!

  • Bas

    PaoloM said:
    vesuvius said:
    *snip*
    Take a look at this.
    That's a great article. Especially useful if you're not used to using OSX or Windows, since it explains the essential difference in window paradigms, and as a result, the way the Dock/Taskbar work.

    One thing that keeps troubling me about the new taskbar is the move away from the notification area, to the taskbar. Okay, so messenger is now on the task bar. Fine, I regularly open my contact list, so I can imagine that having it there could be useful. But as the article states:

    The new Taskbar may also at last provide a way for windowless applications to run without cluttering up the Notification Area. This is demonstrated by Windows Live Messenger. Closing all the Messenger windows doesn't remove the Taskbar icon; it stays there until you explicitly quit. WLM no longer needs to put itself in the Notification Area just to avoid exiting when the last window is closed. The old notification icon's menu is now provided by a jump list on the taskbar icon. This will in time allow software to stop cluttering the Notification Area—residence as a regular Taskbar button is now a viable option.


    So, if I look at my notification area now, I have just Messenger, the WHS connector, and the power management/network/volume trinity there. But if I expand it to show the hidden icons, I see a whole bunch of stuff. AnyDVD, Dell QuickSet, Sidebar, Live Mesh, the Fingerprint Reader Suite... all stuff I want to have running in the background all the time, but I rarely interact with them. I just don't need to see those icons, that's why I hid them in the notification area. If Windows 7 is going to push always-running applications out of the notification area and onto the taskbar to avoid cluttering up the notification area, the result will be that the taskbar will get cluttered... which is worse, because now I'll be forced to look at a whole range of buttons that I'll never interact with, with no way to hide them.

    How is Windows going to combat that problem? I'm really not looking forward to constantly having to look at that smug AnyDVD fox that does nothing but take up space on my taskbar.

  • SlackmasterK

    esoteric said:



    7 is running fine on both my laptop and my desktop (depicted).

    The desktop did have a driver failure during 7 install, but it appears to basically work. Still, it's a bit sad that "self-healing" doesn't really account for this. The most fundamental kind of healing, it would seem, would be to ensure all system files are present. But so far no big deal - it's only Sticky Notes that complains over a missing Ink dll.
    Loaded on my primary workstation (pictured) and laptop. Beautiful. I'd take this beta over Vista any time. Even with SP1. Pay no attention to my crappy ATI Radeon x1650's.

  • Ion Todirel

    Bass said:
    arunpv said:
    *snip*
    Your avatar is hella creepy.

    But anyway it looks like my desktop is whats not ready for Windows 7, or something. Well the fact that I made a good faith attempt to install the thing only have to installer crash out near the beginning. Oh well.. it looks like I am "forced" to use Ubuntu and Windows XP for the foreseeable future!
    Bass said:
    Your avatar is hella creepy.


    who's speaking... Smiley

  • Ion Todirel

    SlackmasterK said:
    esoteric said:
    *snip*
    Loaded on my primary workstation (pictured) and laptop. Beautiful. I'd take this beta over Vista any time. Even with SP1. Pay no attention to my crappy ATI Radeon x1650's.
    wow, 7.1 for calculations... does Win7 use the same experience index as Vista? what CPU do you have?

  • Sven Groot

    Ion Todirel said:
    SlackmasterK said:
    *snip*
    wow, 7.1 for calculations... does Win7 use the same experience index as Vista? what CPU do you have?
    http://blogs.msdn.com/e7/archive/2009/01/19/engineering-the-windows-7-windows-experience-index.aspx

  • SlackmasterK

    Ion Todirel said:
    SlackmasterK said:
    *snip*
    wow, 7.1 for calculations... does Win7 use the same experience index as Vista? what CPU do you have?
    I am told it's the same as Vista up to 5.9 and 7 builds on top of that for new hardware... But I am told many things...

    Standard boring old quad-core... Q6600 Kentsfield.    

  • Sabot

    arunpv said:
    I had bad experience with Windows 7- i installed it on my 9100 inspiron  Dell Laptop everything went well install SQL 2008 and VS 2008 works great and even faster. but, when i installed Cisco VPN Client i saw Blue screen of death. I had taken a system image before installing vpn client.


    As for the VPN thing, install a Vista version and it will work just fine!

  • Sabot

    Erisan said:
    Never. It works very well and it is definely the best Windows I have ever used. It just feels way too restrictive and I can't do my work with it so it's "no-go".
    Erisan, explain more about why you feel more restricted using '7? I would like to understand.

  • esoteric

    Bas said:
    PaoloM said:
    *snip*


    So, if I look at my notification area now, I have just Messenger, the WHS connector, and the power management/network/volume trinity there. But if I expand it to show the hidden icons, I see a whole bunch of stuff. AnyDVD, Dell QuickSet, Sidebar, Live Mesh, the Fingerprint Reader Suite... all stuff I want to have running in the background all the time, but I rarely interact with them. I just don't need to see those icons, that's why I hid them in the notification area. If Windows 7 is going to push always-running applications out of the notification area and onto the taskbar to avoid cluttering up the notification area, the result will be that the taskbar will get cluttered... which is worse, because now I'll be forced to look at a whole range of buttons that I'll never interact with, with no way to hide them.

    How is Windows going to combat that problem? I'm really not looking forward to constantly having to look at that smug AnyDVD fox that does nothing but take up space on my taskbar.
    A good point there. This decluttering can lead to more cluttering...

  • Erisan

    Sabot said:
    Erisan said:
    *snip*
    Erisan, explain more about why you feel more restricted using '7? I would like to understand.
    I want to make clear that as in "normal use" I like Windows 7 a lot. It works fine (except my Radeon 9250 is not supported anymore) and I can do my developing work with it; test that multi-platform software compiles and works ok (using GTK+/Qt).

    As a geek Linux gives me free hands to modify the whole system as I like it to be. For example I'm able to install Debian over the network and run Wayland/XOrg with my own XCB-based window manager on it. It's more like having fun and learn about computers and operating systems, discuss with developers about the code and undestand what is going on in projects.
    To me Windows is a huge black box that I'm not able to modify in any sane/safe way.

    I'm doing Linux developing as my full-time job so one could say I'm biased. Well... maybe I am Wink

  • eagle

    Bass said:
    arunpv said:
    *snip*
    Your avatar is hella creepy.

    But anyway it looks like my desktop is whats not ready for Windows 7, or something. Well the fact that I made a good faith attempt to install the thing only have to installer crash out near the beginning. Oh well.. it looks like I am "forced" to use Ubuntu and Windows XP for the foreseeable future!
    It reminds me of the XP beta, I installed it on a Lenovo IdeaPad S10 just to see how it would respond, but I quickly saw that with Windows 7 I'm never going to look back....

  • Sabot

    Erisan said:
    Sabot said:
    *snip*
    I want to make clear that as in "normal use" I like Windows 7 a lot. It works fine (except my Radeon 9250 is not supported anymore) and I can do my developing work with it; test that multi-platform software compiles and works ok (using GTK+/Qt).

    As a geek Linux gives me free hands to modify the whole system as I like it to be. For example I'm able to install Debian over the network and run Wayland/XOrg with my own XCB-based window manager on it. It's more like having fun and learn about computers and operating systems, discuss with developers about the code and undestand what is going on in projects.
    To me Windows is a huge black box that I'm not able to modify in any sane/safe way.

    I'm doing Linux developing as my full-time job so one could say I'm biased. Well... maybe I am Wink
    Fair comment Erisan.

    I often think that the different between Windows and Linux users & developers is good old fashion human preference.

    For example, I'm happy to surrender control and let things happen on my behalf, why my friend Alan isn't, he needs to know what everything is doing , he needs to play with settings and install software and try to find the best combination of things. Alan does like to utterly control his computer and doesn't wish to wrestle with it. Fortunately Beer is more important than computers in our friendship.

    Another Alan, Alan Cooper to be exact, wrote about this in his book about Developers, The Inmates are Running the Asylum, It's call the 'Jetway test' on page 94!

    Google">http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=04cFCVXC_AUC&pg=PA93&lpg=PA93&dq=alan+cooper+jetway&source=web&ots=jfwd-0r2jR&sig=ZBMhcJFy0qjYrbcSaVJKRxxIOiA&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=1&ct=result#PPA94,M1">Google Books has the page here. (Please note the Google Books doesn't work for me in IE8)

    I have to say but perhaps it's an age thing, when I was younger I wanted to go into the cockpit so bad, now I don't care just want a comfy seat.

  • Sabot

    eagle said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*
    It reminds me of the XP beta, I installed it on a Lenovo IdeaPad S10 just to see how it would respond, but I quickly saw that with Windows 7 I'm never going to look back....
    I'm with you on this one Eagle ... I ain't looking back! I'm just hoping it doesn't cost alot of money to upgrade.

  • Cyonix

    Sabot said:
    eagle said:
    *snip*
    I'm with you on this one Eagle ... I ain't looking back! I'm just hoping it doesn't cost alot of money to upgrade.
    I just moved over to Windows 7. I like it so far, only problem i've had is Chrome not working.

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