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Forget WinCE, Microsoft cellphone to run NetBSD

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  • User profile image
    Bass

    http://www.boygeniusreport.com/2009/01/31/forget-microsoft-ce-sidekick-lx-2009-to-run-netbsd%27/

    Microsoft is also actively recruiting NetBSD developers, even posting to their mailing lists looking for employees on this project.

    Is this to be the fabled Zune Phone?

    More importantly:
    Could this mark Microsoft's migration to POSIX architectures? Will Microsoft's next operating systems be POSIX based? Will Microsoft pull an Apple?

    Will I go grab a beer? Will I stop asking questions?

    ?????

  • User profile image
    DCMonkey

    One wonders why they even bought Danger, if they were just going to let them keep doing what they were doing instead of applying thier expertise to reviving a moribund Windows Mobile.

    But it wouldn't be a MS product if it didn't have at least one internal competitor Smiley

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    Of course they might be hiring NetBSD developers in order to aid in porting existing code from NetBSD to WinCE, so it's largely speculation right now. Not that it really matters what OS runs on a phone as long as it does the job, does it?

    And POSIX? Windows NT has been POSIX compliant since it's inception. If you're running Vista Enterprise/Ultimate or Server 2003+ it's just a checkbox away.

  • User profile image
    Cream​Filling512

    POSIX is 20 years old, I can't imagine anyone even considering that.

  • User profile image
    eagle

    I'll have a beer,

    ....the SideKick is just ONE device. Over a hundred phones run Windows Mobile with WinCE inside

  • User profile image
    rjdohnert

    eagle said:
    I'll have a beer,

    ....the SideKick is just ONE device. Over a hundred phones run Windows Mobile with WinCE inside
    Why Microsoft just doesnt tack on a Zune type interface, call the thing the Zune phone and run with that I will never know.

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    Bass:  what benefit would POSIX bring to *ANY* new product unless that product was some kind of gateway to legacy systems?

    as for them looking for folks who kow netBSD well.... that could be usefull in a wide range of areas that may or may not have anything to do with the final form of the device....

    for example a hardcore UNIX developer might have better skills at low level hardware interfacing and wrtiting core system code.
    that skill would be good for any target OS.
    just one example.

  • User profile image
    Ray7

    figuerres said:
    Bass:  what benefit would POSIX bring to *ANY* new product unless that product was some kind of gateway to legacy systems?

    as for them looking for folks who kow netBSD well.... that could be usefull in a wide range of areas that may or may not have anything to do with the final form of the device....

    for example a hardcore UNIX developer might have better skills at low level hardware interfacing and wrtiting core system code.
    that skill would be good for any target OS.
    just one example.
    Didn't MS hire a bunch of Unix bods to help convert Hotmail over to Windows many years ago?

  • User profile image
    corona_coder

    Ray7 said:
    figuerres said:
    *snip*
    Didn't MS hire a bunch of Unix bods to help convert Hotmail over to Windows many years ago?

    Microsoft should have used Linux. Linux is the future, anything else is a waste of hard drive space.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    figuerres said:
    Bass:  what benefit would POSIX bring to *ANY* new product unless that product was some kind of gateway to legacy systems?

    as for them looking for folks who kow netBSD well.... that could be usefull in a wide range of areas that may or may not have anything to do with the final form of the device....

    for example a hardcore UNIX developer might have better skills at low level hardware interfacing and wrtiting core system code.
    that skill would be good for any target OS.
    just one example.
    Because POSIX is a standard all operating systems should comply to. Let me tell you a little expirence I have been having..

    I've been writing an Qt app (mostly to learn more about Qt), I've told some people about the app the first question I usually get is something like: "What platform does it run on?". That's a silly question to me, it's almost like writing a website and asking "What web browser that it run on?".

    Granted it's much easier to write platform independent websites, even IE is implemented a very large set of W3C standards. But standards exist for operating systems too, and POSIX is the big one in this arena. That's why I think it's important. If I write standards compliant code, I want my code to be able to run pretty much anywhere.

    Almost all the code I write, no matter if it's C/C++/C# or Java, is operating system agnostic. It doesn't assume any specific operating system at all. I do this on purpose. I want the attention and questions directed at the software itself, not what platforms it runs on or what technologies it uses. POSIX makes this a lot easier.

  • User profile image
    DCMonkey

    Bass said:
    figuerres said:
    *snip*
    Because POSIX is a standard all operating systems should comply to. Let me tell you a little expirence I have been having..

    I've been writing an Qt app (mostly to learn more about Qt), I've told some people about the app the first question I usually get is something like: "What platform does it run on?". That's a silly question to me, it's almost like writing a website and asking "What web browser that it run on?".

    Granted it's much easier to write platform independent websites, even IE is implemented a very large set of W3C standards. But standards exist for operating systems too, and POSIX is the big one in this arena. That's why I think it's important. If I write standards compliant code, I want my code to be able to run pretty much anywhere.

    Almost all the code I write, no matter if it's C/C++/C# or Java, is operating system agnostic. It doesn't assume any specific operating system at all. I do this on purpose. I want the attention and questions directed at the software itself, not what platforms it runs on or what technologies it uses. POSIX makes this a lot easier.
    Try wrting a cross platform GUI app (or a phone UI) using only the POSIX standard without the help of a library like Qt.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    DCMonkey said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*
    Try wrting a cross platform GUI app (or a phone UI) using only the POSIX standard without the help of a library like Qt.
    You can't. But before we start writing up new standards it would help if the original standards are met.

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