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Will VS2010 run on XP?

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  • User profile image
    alexmac

    Hi,
    Do you know if VS2010 will run on XP? Some of the preview bits are Vista only.

    Yes I know XP is getting a bit old now but was a query from a user group I gave a talk at.

    Thanks,

    Alex

  • User profile image
    Dr Herbie

    Actually, that's a good point : I don't know of ANY businesses running Vista and the company I work for has no plans to upgrade from XP anytime soon (we run what our customers run, hell we're still on SQLServer2000).

    Herbie

    EDIT: to clarify when I say 'I don't know any businesses running Vista', I should have put 'I don't have any customers running Vista, or have any friends working at companies running Vista'

  • User profile image
    PaoloM

    Dr Herbie said:
    Actually, that's a good point : I don't know of ANY businesses running Vista and the company I work for has no plans to upgrade from XP anytime soon (we run what our customers run, hell we're still on SQLServer2000).

    Herbie

    EDIT: to clarify when I say 'I don't know any businesses running Vista', I should have put 'I don't have any customers running Vista, or have any friends working at companies running Vista'
    They'll probably won't have a need for VS 2010 as well Smiley

  • User profile image
    alexmac

    Dr Herbie said:
    Actually, that's a good point : I don't know of ANY businesses running Vista and the company I work for has no plans to upgrade from XP anytime soon (we run what our customers run, hell we're still on SQLServer2000).

    Herbie

    EDIT: to clarify when I say 'I don't know any businesses running Vista', I should have put 'I don't have any customers running Vista, or have any friends working at companies running Vista'
    I agree with Dr Herbie I dont know of any businesses running vista either.

  • User profile image
    Dr Herbie

    PaoloM said:
    Dr Herbie said:
    *snip*
    They'll probably won't have a need for VS 2010 as well Smiley
    So you're suggesting that the only reason to get 2010 is to target Vista\Windows7?

    Oh, come on.

    I've seen the VS\TFS 2010 preview videos (we'especially excited about the branching\merging UI changes). Jusr becuase we're still writing WinForms code doesn't mean we don't benefit from the new toolings in newer versions of the IDE.


    Herbie

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    alexmac said:
    Dr Herbie said:
    *snip*
    I agree with Dr Herbie I dont know of any businesses running vista either.
    I agree with Paolo, what would be the business need to use VS 2010 if you are targeting an OS that is most likely using Windows Forms applications?

    As a Winforms developer - which I am by the way - there is very little on offer between Visual Studio 2005/2008/2010 so why would you need the upgrade?

    There is a big push towards WPF/Silverlight, with the tools reaching puberty now, so for ISV's wanting to make the switch, then VS2010 targetting Windows 7 seems a logical choice.

    This is why managed support is going to be need to be baked into VS 2010 and fully supported, otherwise ISV's are going to be like Business was with Vista and say "we don't need VS 2010" as there is no ROI.

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    PaoloM said:
    Dr Herbie said:
    *snip*
    They'll probably won't have a need for VS 2010 as well Smiley
    WHoa... that's not a very good statement there....

    VS should be able to run on XP, Vista and Win 7

    thats in line with most other MSFT products I have used.

    there may be advamntages to using the new os but XP is still not "retired"
    now win say win 8 comes alonmg and XP is fully out of the mainstream then ok.

  • User profile image
    Ion Todirel

    > Will VS2010 run on XP?

    Definitely, why wouldn't it? Wink

  • User profile image
    PerfectPhase

    Ion Todirel said:
    > Will VS2010 run on XP?

    Definitely, why wouldn't it? Wink

    Given that the CTP was running on 2003, I'd say it's a pretty safe bet it'll run on XP.

  • User profile image
    gadget

    vesuvius said:
    alexmac said:
    *snip*
    I agree with Paolo, what would be the business need to use VS 2010 if you are targeting an OS that is most likely using Windows Forms applications?

    As a Winforms developer - which I am by the way - there is very little on offer between Visual Studio 2005/2008/2010 so why would you need the upgrade?

    There is a big push towards WPF/Silverlight, with the tools reaching puberty now, so for ISV's wanting to make the switch, then VS2010 targetting Windows 7 seems a logical choice.

    This is why managed support is going to be need to be baked into VS 2010 and fully supported, otherwise ISV's are going to be like Business was with Vista and say "we don't need VS 2010" as there is no ROI.

    There may be very liittle change to Winforms between Vs 2005 and 2008 but how are you going to use any of the new features like Linq or WCF if you haven't moved off of 2005. And XML literals in VB. and on and on.

    We are a winforms shop but I wouldn't even consider going back to VS 2005.

    As for XP vs Windows 7 or Vista. Our customer deployments are XP but all of our developers/support staff run Vista x64. If we need to test something in xp we do it in Vmware.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Ion Todirel said:
    > Will VS2010 run on XP?

    Definitely, why wouldn't it? Wink
    To push adoption of Windows 7?

    Remember how Halo 2 was artificially gimped so it only ran on Windows Vista machines, despite not using Dx10 at all?

  • User profile image
    TommyCarlier

    vesuvius said:
    alexmac said:
    *snip*
    I agree with Paolo, what would be the business need to use VS 2010 if you are targeting an OS that is most likely using Windows Forms applications?

    As a Winforms developer - which I am by the way - there is very little on offer between Visual Studio 2005/2008/2010 so why would you need the upgrade?

    There is a big push towards WPF/Silverlight, with the tools reaching puberty now, so for ISV's wanting to make the switch, then VS2010 targetting Windows 7 seems a logical choice.

    This is why managed support is going to be need to be baked into VS 2010 and fully supported, otherwise ISV's are going to be like Business was with Vista and say "we don't need VS 2010" as there is no ROI.
    At work, I use Visual Studio 2005 on Windows XP. The reason I'm still using XP (my boss has asked me if I wanted to upgrade to Vista) is to make sure that the applications I develop work great on Windows XP. We're still developing in .NET 2.0 and Windows Forms, which is a conscious decision. At home, I use Visual Studio 2008 while still developing mainly in .NET 2.0 and Windows Forms. But VS2008 gives me the C# 3 compiler, background compilation and all the other new improvements while still targeting .NET 2.0. We're planning to upgrade to VS2008 at work too, without upgrading my developer machine to Vista.

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    gadget said:
    vesuvius said:
    *snip*

    There may be very liittle change to Winforms between Vs 2005 and 2008 but how are you going to use any of the new features like Linq or WCF if you haven't moved off of 2005. And XML literals in VB. and on and on.

    We are a winforms shop but I wouldn't even consider going back to VS 2005.

    As for XP vs Windows 7 or Vista. Our customer deployments are XP but all of our developers/support staff run Vista x64. If we need to test something in xp we do it in Vmware.

    It would take a very wealthy software house to upgrade their system, just so they can use Linq. Stored procedures are superior to Linq, and I find them easier to construct.

    If you do need WCF, then you can use VWD Express, but likelyhood now, is you are already deeply involved in ASMX web services already, so changing your service layer again would require a wealthy software house, and customers that like their systems upgraded willy-nilly.

    I have Pro C# 2005 and 2008 by Andrew Troelsen, and doubt I'm in a hurry to get Pro C# 2010. .NET is moving far to fast at present, and I still find enormous value in .NET 2.0.

    I too develop in VS 2008, but from a head-versus-heart, i.e. business sense, I find it impossible to justify moving to .NET 4.0, if you are targeting XP using Windows Forms.

  • User profile image
    Yggdrasil

    vesuvius said:
    gadget said:
    *snip*
    It would take a very wealthy software house to upgrade their system, just so they can use Linq. Stored procedures are superior to Linq, and I find them easier to construct.

    If you do need WCF, then you can use VWD Express, but likelyhood now, is you are already deeply involved in ASMX web services already, so changing your service layer again would require a wealthy software house, and customers that like their systems upgraded willy-nilly.

    I have Pro C# 2005 and 2008 by Andrew Troelsen, and doubt I'm in a hurry to get Pro C# 2010. .NET is moving far to fast at present, and I still find enormous value in .NET 2.0.

    I too develop in VS 2008, but from a head-versus-heart, i.e. business sense, I find it impossible to justify moving to .NET 4.0, if you are targeting XP using Windows Forms.
    Read up again on what Linq gives you. I find it painful to return to .NET2.0/VS2005 because I miss Linq to Objects so darn much. The ability to query/slice/filter/join any IEnumerable<T> is a godsend.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    Yggdrasil said:
    vesuvius said:
    *snip*
    Read up again on what Linq gives you. I find it painful to return to .NET2.0/VS2005 because I miss Linq to Objects so darn much. The ability to query/slice/filter/join any IEnumerable<T> is a godsend.
    I am trying to understand what is fundamentally different between embedded SQL (i.e. SQL-to-Objects) and Linq other then a slightly different syntax. I know .NET/C# never supported embedded SQL but still.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    TommyCarlier said:
    vesuvius said:
    *snip*
    At work, I use Visual Studio 2005 on Windows XP. The reason I'm still using XP (my boss has asked me if I wanted to upgrade to Vista) is to make sure that the applications I develop work great on Windows XP. We're still developing in .NET 2.0 and Windows Forms, which is a conscious decision. At home, I use Visual Studio 2008 while still developing mainly in .NET 2.0 and Windows Forms. But VS2008 gives me the C# 3 compiler, background compilation and all the other new improvements while still targeting .NET 2.0. We're planning to upgrade to VS2008 at work too, without upgrading my developer machine to Vista.
    I am also using Visual Studio 2005, but I would like to change to Visual Studio 2008. Does anyone know if I can make Visual Studio 2005 compatible projects in 2008? That is an important requirement.

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    Bass said:
    TommyCarlier said:
    *snip*
    I am also using Visual Studio 2005, but I would like to change to Visual Studio 2008. Does anyone know if I can make Visual Studio 2005 compatible projects in 2008? That is an important requirement.
    I doubt it. Open up a VS2005 project in VS2008 you get the conversion wizard.

    As for the argument:
    "The reason I'm still using XP is to make sure that the applications I develop work great on Windows XP"
    ...are you also testing your apps in Vista/Windows7?

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    Bass said:
    Yggdrasil said:
    *snip*
    I am trying to understand what is fundamentally different between embedded SQL (i.e. SQL-to-Objects) and Linq other then a slightly different syntax. I know .NET/C# never supported embedded SQL but still.
    The difference is between Linq To SQL and Linq to Objects.

    I love Linq to objects, but for data...oh well!

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