Coffeehouse Thread

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Absolutely Brilliant, Windows XP Mode in 7

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  • TommyCarlier

    What I find cool about this is that it's free and it includes a fully licensed copy of Windows XP.

  • intelman

    TommyCarlier said:
    What I find cool about this is that it's free and it includes a fully licensed copy of Windows XP.
    Well, I do not consider it free. You still pay for Windows 7. It is a feature.

  • Bas

    You don't get it on Windows 7, you have to download it seperately. Kind of like how Messenger isn't a Windows feature, but more a free application.

    Although I guess you have a point in that you probably need a Windows 7 license to be able to use the free XP license.

  • Evil SEO

    TommyCarlier said:
    What I find cool about this is that it's free and it includes a fully licensed copy of Windows XP.
    Free = Having to buy Windows 7 Business or higher.

  • GoddersUK

    Evil SEO said:
    TommyCarlier said:
    *snip*
    Free = Having to buy Windows 7 Business or higher.
    well you know what he means...

    you don't have to fork out for Windows XP IN ADDITION TO 7.

    So effectively it's bogof.

  • ManipUni

    Before you all start getting carried away with this "free XP licence" thing... There is no evidence that this will be licenced for stand-alone usage. They could (and likely will) only licence it to be run within the virtual machine.

    As I said this is just a carbon-copy of what OS X did to OS 9.

  • W3bbo

    ManipUni said:
    Before you all start getting carried away with this "free XP licence" thing... There is no evidence that this will be licenced for stand-alone usage. They could (and likely will) only licence it to be run within the virtual machine.

    As I said this is just a carbon-copy of what OS X did to OS 9.
    No, it isn't.

    Classic mode in OS X was an abstraction layer, similar to how Wine works on *nix, it wasn't virtualisation. It was also available to "home users" not just users of the Business-class SKUs.

  • Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    W3bbo said:
    ManipUni said:
    *snip*
    No, it isn't.

    Classic mode in OS X was an abstraction layer, similar to how Wine works on *nix, it wasn't virtualisation. It was also available to "home users" not just users of the Business-class SKUs.
    Classic wasn't virtualization per se (in that they modified certain system files to replace low-level system calls with higher-level calls into the OSX envrionment), but you were running a full copy of Mac OS 9 (the OS would boot either during OSX startup or when a Classic application was launched).  Classic is essentially Mac OS 9 running as an application within OSX, very similar to how virtualization works on x86 platforms (although Classic is probably more analogous to platforms like Xen virtualization where the kernel must be aware that it's being virtualized to work).

  • W3bbo

    CannotResolveSymbol said:
    W3bbo said:
    *snip*
    Classic wasn't virtualization per se (in that they modified certain system files to replace low-level system calls with higher-level calls into the OSX envrionment), but you were running a full copy of Mac OS 9 (the OS would boot either during OSX startup or when a Classic application was launched).  Classic is essentially Mac OS 9 running as an application within OSX, very similar to how virtualization works on x86 platforms (although Classic is probably more analogous to platforms like Xen virtualization where the kernel must be aware that it's being virtualized to work).
    You didn't contradict me then.

    One thing about virtualisation I don't get is how Virtuozzo works. Can anyone explain how they got it to work?

  • Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    W3bbo said:
    CannotResolveSymbol said:
    *snip*
    You didn't contradict me then.

    One thing about virtualisation I don't get is how Virtuozzo works. Can anyone explain how they got it to work?
    But it's not similar to how Wine works in *nix; you're running the full operating system, with all the advantages (compatibility) and disadvantages (cooperative multitasking, no protected memory) of Mac OS 9.

    Classic uses sort of a "halfway" virtualization approach:  instead of running the OS unmodified in a lower-privileged execution environment and intercepting instructions that would normally modify the state of the hardware (disk I/O, display, etc.), they're patching out these calls altogether and replacing them with higher-level instructions that allow it to play nicely alongside OSX.  This makes Classic less generic (you're not going to boot Mac OS 8.5 in Classic), but it means Apple can tune Classic for performance in a manner that's not possible with pure virtualization, while maintaining compatibility with old applications and sandboxing those applications away from apps running under OSX.

    Compare this to Wine, which is a compatibility layer.  Wine runs Windows executables natively on a Linux machine; Windows API calls are routed to the equivalent calls in the Wine library.  Here, Windows applications are being managed completely by the host operating system; there's not a copy of Windows hiding in the background managing Windows applications separately from Linux applications.

  • brian.​shapiro

    who here will actually need to use this

  • blowdart

    brian.shapiro said:
    who here will actually need to use this
    If you could run IE6 in it ........



  • stevo_

    They can't include it as it will destroy users choice of selecting other 'xp mode' software.

  • Evil SEO

    What's the point? There are a lot of tools to run different version of IE (from 3.0 to 8) on Vista to make your pages look like a Web 2.0 Picasso painting. Some of these tools also allow you to run multiple IE engines at once and compare the results in different tabs so you easily can make your own personal abstract art gallery.

  • W3bbo

    Evil SEO said:
    What's the point? There are a lot of tools to run different version of IE (from 3.0 to 8) on Vista to make your pages look like a Web 2.0 Picasso painting. Some of these tools also allow you to run multiple IE engines at once and compare the results in different tabs so you easily can make your own personal abstract art gallery.
    Those techniques aren't reliable. For instance, different versions of IE installed on the same computer all use the same registry key to for their user-agent string, so on a computer with IE8 and IE6 installed IE6 will report itself as being IE8.

  • Sven Groot

    blowdart said:
    brian.shapiro said:
    *snip*
    If you could run IE6 in it ........



    That's not really new though. Virtual PC is free, and you can already download free XP VMs for IE testing. Ok, so it doesn't have the seamless virtualization, but that isn't all that important if testing in IE6 is all you want.

  • staceyw

    As long as we are exploring this road, we may as well make following icons:
    0) Dos 2.0
    1) Dos 5.0 (just found an old manual in my garage today)
    2) Windows 95
    3) Windows XP
    4) Windows NT 3.5/4.0
    5) Windows Vista 1.0
    6) Windows Server 2003/2008
    7) Dos Equis 1.0
    8) Linux x
    9) AIX 6.1
    10) OSX 10.5











  • SixSIx

    dddd

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