Coffeehouse Thread

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Borland is Dead

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  • User profile image
    DCMonkey

    After selling off their underappreciated Delphi RAD IDE/Language/Framework to Embarcadero last year to concentrate on "application lifecycle management" corporate shelfware, Borland is now being bought by MicroFocus, known mostly (to me at least) for their COBOL compiler.


    What a sad end to a once great company.

  • User profile image
    rhm

    They bet their future on Java in the mid '90s. Haha, at least Sun got killed by their own poison as well Smiley

  • User profile image
    Ion Todirel

    rhm said:
    They bet their future on Java in the mid '90s. Haha, at least Sun got killed by their own poison as well Smiley
    sad... Delphi was really a great IDE

  • User profile image
    bureX

    Awww nuts... Borland Delphi was my first IDE ever, it's what started pulling me into the coding world before I even knew what a programming language was... I'm kind of bummed out to see Borland dissapear like that. Sad

  • User profile image
    DCMonkey

    bureX said:
    Awww nuts... Borland Delphi was my first IDE ever, it's what started pulling me into the coding world before I even knew what a programming language was... I'm kind of bummed out to see Borland dissapear like that. Sad
    Well, Delphi itself is still alive, but when I see the name Borland, I think all those great late 80's early 90's products. I learned OOP with Turbo Pascal 5.5. I did alot of database mangling with Paradox for DOS. There was brief time where Borland C++ was a better Windows IDE than Visual C++.

  • User profile image
    Ion Todirel

    I was pointing at the company who used to make it, I grow up with Turbo Pascal and Turbo C then a bit of Delphi and after that Visual Studio. Good times...

  • User profile image
    ZippyV

    A multi-window application on the desktop is not what I call a "great IDE".

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    You guys are all showing your age

  • User profile image
    Turbodad

    Sad indeed. I'm going to show my age too: I started learning programming with Turbo Pascal 3.

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    Turbodad said:
    Sad indeed. I'm going to show my age too: I started learning programming with Turbo Pascal 3.
    i will match that and go deeper:

    I started with a Commodore Vic-20

    3K of ram, screen was a TV at about 30 chars on a line ...

    first hardware options were using soldering iron to make 2 expansion cart's into one:

    that gave me 6k of ram + graphics commands and debug commands.

    second project was a homebrew A to D convrter to allow me to use a tapedeck to store programs.
    that was a lot cheaper than buying a special C= data cassete drive.

    later I had a C= 128 and leanred about CP/M 80 and memory bank switching with the later 6502 compatable chip used in the C=128  ( 8502 I think it was??)
    for the 128 I had an assembler and a C compiler
    that was how I first got exposure to what C and Unix were like.

    the C package had a command line that was like a Unix "C shell"

  • User profile image
    rhm

    figuerres said:
    Turbodad said:
    *snip*
    i will match that and go deeper:

    I started with a Commodore Vic-20

    3K of ram, screen was a TV at about 30 chars on a line ...

    first hardware options were using soldering iron to make 2 expansion cart's into one:

    that gave me 6k of ram + graphics commands and debug commands.

    second project was a homebrew A to D convrter to allow me to use a tapedeck to store programs.
    that was a lot cheaper than buying a special C= data cassete drive.

    later I had a C= 128 and leanred about CP/M 80 and memory bank switching with the later 6502 compatable chip used in the C=128  ( 8502 I think it was??)
    for the 128 I had an assembler and a C compiler
    that was how I first got exposure to what C and Unix were like.

    the C package had a command line that was like a Unix "C shell"
    I think we should save the 8 bit stories for our therapists or something Smiley

    I bought my first PC in 1990 and soon after bought Borland Turbo C++ v1 - although I only used it as a C compiler.  It was a revelation - a nice multi-file text editor with a built in source debugger. It was a great place to learn your first C because the API surface wasn't much bigger than the classic libC - I feel sorry for anyone learning to program for the first time in a modern environment.

    Borland started to lose out with their C/C++ products pretty early on in the Windows growth cycle. The last version I bought was Borland C++ v4 in about 1994. I wrote a few programs for Windows 3.1 using Borland's OWL (object-windows library), which was easier to get to grips with than MFC and more object oriented, but a bit bloaty on the memory front. Microsoft started licencing MFC to other compiler vendors which marginalised OWL. Then ofc they came out with Visual Studio and that's what got most programmers using Microsoft compilers instead of Borland or Watcom.

  • User profile image
    raymond

    ZippyV said:
    A multi-window application on the desktop is not what I call a "great IDE".

    Sounds like your a one window kind of guy.

    Kind of limiting.

    Expand your horizons, try a two window application and work your way up.

    Love multi-window applications.

  • User profile image
    Sabot

    Borland always tried too hard to be 'the' alternative but didn't gain enough market share to drive it forward.

    I remember having a deep decision on VB4 v Delphi many years back. On paper Delphi beat VB4 hands-down, compiled, true OO , got on really well with Windows, did 32bit well, etc. From a developers point of view it was nicer language to code, the IDE rocked. So all boxes ticked? Well all but some really big ones!

    Delphi didn't do ODBC, instead it had it's on database connection system that not every DB vender supported, or supported badly.

    Delphi didn't do OCX, again it had it's own components just at the time when VB coders where saving man-months by buying someone elses components and plugging them in. Borland didn't quite land square on this gravy train with their own variant of OCX.

    ... and now the killer ... VB was cheaper.

  • User profile image
    Maddus Mattus

    figuerres said:
    Turbodad said:
    *snip*
    i will match that and go deeper:

    I started with a Commodore Vic-20

    3K of ram, screen was a TV at about 30 chars on a line ...

    first hardware options were using soldering iron to make 2 expansion cart's into one:

    that gave me 6k of ram + graphics commands and debug commands.

    second project was a homebrew A to D convrter to allow me to use a tapedeck to store programs.
    that was a lot cheaper than buying a special C= data cassete drive.

    later I had a C= 128 and leanred about CP/M 80 and memory bank switching with the later 6502 compatable chip used in the C=128  ( 8502 I think it was??)
    for the 128 I had an assembler and a C compiler
    that was how I first got exposure to what C and Unix were like.

    the C package had a command line that was like a Unix "C shell"
    Dude,

    You didnt own a Commodore 64?

    You fail at ICT Big Smile

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    Maddus Mattus said:
    figuerres said:
    *snip*
    Dude,

    You didnt own a Commodore 64?

    You fail at ICT Big Smile
    Nope I skipped the 64 Smiley

    but the 128 was really a 64 in two ways:

    1) 90% of the system was the same.
    2) there was a "64 mode" for games and stuff i forget now but you held down two keys and it would come up in c=64 mode and run all the c=64 games.

    that aside i was the guy who had the tools to fix things for the local c= users group bbs
    the guy who ran the bbs had me helping him mod bbs files and one time he had to get me to fix a floppy disk.
    he had like 3 1541 drives and a fancy 1.2 meg drive that used a special driver to work with the rest of the c=64 stuff.
    on day he goofed and the driver tried to write to a normal disk that had a bunch of bbs files ....
    i had a c=128 app that would let me sector-edit commodore format disks, i save the bbs from losing a bunch of data with that tool Smiley

    also I had an Amiga 500 before I started on the PC and Mac stuff.
    I also used to fix the old Mac's -- the like first and second generation one pice ones.

    Yeah I been at this a little while Smiley

  • User profile image
    BlackTiger

    Eah... Dead... Finally. Or once again? Or definitely finally?
    Original Borland is dead for many-many-many years already, actually.
    Misfortune, bad management, overestimates, strong competitors and friendemies like Microsoft.
     
    Duke Nukem For(n)ever is dead, Borland is dead...
    Who's next? "Old skool" passing away, unfortunately.
     
    But what in exchange? Nothing... Beta-culture, googlism...

    If you stumbled and fell down, it doesn't mean yet, that you're going in the wrong direction.
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    Erwin Blonk

    rhm said:
    figuerres said:
    *snip*
    I think we should save the 8 bit stories for our therapists or something Smiley

    I bought my first PC in 1990 and soon after bought Borland Turbo C++ v1 - although I only used it as a C compiler.  It was a revelation - a nice multi-file text editor with a built in source debugger. It was a great place to learn your first C because the API surface wasn't much bigger than the classic libC - I feel sorry for anyone learning to program for the first time in a modern environment.

    Borland started to lose out with their C/C++ products pretty early on in the Windows growth cycle. The last version I bought was Borland C++ v4 in about 1994. I wrote a few programs for Windows 3.1 using Borland's OWL (object-windows library), which was easier to get to grips with than MFC and more object oriented, but a bit bloaty on the memory front. Microsoft started licencing MFC to other compiler vendors which marginalised OWL. Then ofc they came out with Visual Studio and that's what got most programmers using Microsoft compilers instead of Borland or Watcom.

    TRS-80 Model III, where art thou........

    I can still remember the approximate date, weather, exact location and occasion of the first computer I sat behind and some of the company that was with me.
    And, oh, my very first program:
    10 Print "H"
    20 Print " a"
    30 Print "  l"
    40 Print "   l"
    50 Print "    o"
    60 Goto 10

    Clever, I know.

    Well, I mean, I had learned of the very existence of programming 2 minutes before that and wanted to outsmart the other kids that were as new to it at least somewhat. Two lines didn't do it for me Big Smile

  • User profile image
    JoshRoss

    Erwin Blonk said:
    rhm said:
    *snip*
    TRS-80 Model III, where art thou........

    I can still remember the approximate date, weather, exact location and occasion of the first computer I sat behind and some of the company that was with me.
    And, oh, my very first program:
    10 Print "H"
    20 Print " a"
    30 Print "  l"
    40 Print "   l"
    50 Print "    o"
    60 Goto 10

    Clever, I know.

    Well, I mean, I had learned of the very existence of programming 2 minutes before that and wanted to outsmart the other kids that were as new to it at least somewhat. Two lines didn't do it for me Big Smile

    Hallo?

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