Coffeehouse Thread

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The reason why dynamic languages ported to the .NET CLR have Iron in their name

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  • Heavens​Revenge

    This is just my educated guess but I believe I'm right for this explanation.

    Charles even asked during one interview on C9 called Jimmy Schementi: Inside IronRuby so here's my answer: 

    The CLR is a staticly typed runtime, which is also known as being "strongly typed".  Ruby and Python are Dynamic languages which are primarily typeless.  SO for the dev's making their .NET implementation wanted another way to say or prefix the Languages names with a "Strong" metaphor.  What better to depict strength other than Iron??

    So I believe that naming a dynamic language ported to a strongly typed .NET CLR is called Iron* specifically for that reason, thus the name IronPython and IronRuby were born.

     

    Any thoughts ?? Smiley


  • PerfectPhase

    http://channel9.msdn.com/pdc2008/TL10/     Jump to 13:55   

     

  • JoshRoss

    PerfectPhase said:

    http://channel9.msdn.com/pdc2008/TL10/     Jump to 13:55   

     

    Nice find.  Implementation Running On dot Net.

  • Heavens​Revenge

    PerfectPhase said:

    http://channel9.msdn.com/pdc2008/TL10/     Jump to 13:55   

     

    lol, but he didn't actually say whether or not it was an after the fact thing he noticed or was brought attention to.  Other than that he was just noting a few enterprise/industrial strength selling points about what Iron meant to him personally for the presentation.

     

    I still believe that Iron is a way to prefix a dynamicly typed language on a strongly typed runtime. Wink

  • PerfectPhase

    HeavensRevenge said:
    PerfectPhase said:
    *snip*

    lol, but he didn't actually say whether or not it was an after the fact thing he noticed or was brought attention to.  Other than that he was just noting a few enterprise/industrial strength selling points about what Iron meant to him personally for the presentation.

     

    I still believe that Iron is a way to prefix a dynamicly typed language on a strongly typed runtime. Wink

    I think the closest you'll ever get to a real answer was the hint at Iron Chef, there doesn’t always have to be a good reason for a name and once a precedent is started... Smiley

  • Ion Todirel

    Because it's ironical it seen the light (IronPython) in an experiment to prove that CLR is not a suitable runtime for dynamic languages. Should other dynamic languages have this prefix? They could, but there are better names you could choose from.

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