Coffeehouse Thread

14 posts

Forum Read Only

This forum has been made read only by the site admins. No new threads or comments can be added.

Silverlight on the iPhone

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    Ian2

    Those of us lucky enough to get a seat had a great day with Scott Guthrie last Friday in Birmingham (UK).  At the Q&A session at the end one of my questions to Scott was about the availability of Silverlight for the iPhone.  Scotts' response was that there was 'nothing to say about that today'.  Now it may be my over enthusiasm but I interpretted that in quite a positive light?

  • User profile image
    RLO

    They supplied Seadragon for the iPhone in 2008.  If Microsoft is serious about Silverlight being cross-platform, I see no reason why they wouldn't eventually make it available to the device eventually.  Or try to get approved through the app-store.

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    RLO said:

    They supplied Seadragon for the iPhone in 2008.  If Microsoft is serious about Silverlight being cross-platform, I see no reason why they wouldn't eventually make it available to the device eventually.  Or try to get approved through the app-store.

    Why the app store, if it's a browser plugin?

  • User profile image
    Ian2

    I'm sure I heard quite a while back that a working version already exists , just the politics needing to be overcome?

  • User profile image
    Bas

    Silverlight on the iPhone would mean a way to write and use applications outside the iPhone ecosystem. Why would Apple ever allow this to happen?

  • User profile image
    Ray7

    I don't think Apple would allow it. 

     

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    Apple has a policy that only an application can be installed.

    Java, Flash and SIlverlight - or any other "runtime framework" are not allowed.

     

    there is a .Net for iPhone thing but it does not install a .Net runtime on the phone, they build an image that runs stand alone.

     

    unless Apple chnages that policy it makes this stuff much harder then it should (IMHO) be to do.

  • User profile image
    rhm

    Ray7 said:

    I don't think Apple would allow it. 

     

    I don't think Apple would add it as part of Safari for the same reasons they won't add Flash - if people could run games from the web it would impact the market for native apps.

     

    I think it's possible that Microsoft will offer a kit for people to build native iPhone apps using Silverlight by pre-JITing the code and linking it with a library. This is apparently what Adobe are doing to support iPhone app development in the next release of Flash.

     

  • User profile image
    Ray7

    rhm said:
    Ray7 said:
    *snip*

    I don't think Apple would add it as part of Safari for the same reasons they won't add Flash - if people could run games from the web it would impact the market for native apps.

     

    I think it's possible that Microsoft will offer a kit for people to build native iPhone apps using Silverlight by pre-JITing the code and linking it with a library. This is apparently what Adobe are doing to support iPhone app development in the next release of Flash.

     

    Mmm. Interesting. But I wonder how long it will take Apple to come up with a reason to block apps that don't carry 'the built with XCode tag' (or whatever)?

     

    The problem is that it's not just about the apps. I think part of the reason that Mac sales are increasing is because you need to buy one to write apps for the iPhone. I reckon Apple will want to protect that market too.

     

     

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    Ray7 said:
    rhm said:
    *snip*

    Mmm. Interesting. But I wonder how long it will take Apple to come up with a reason to block apps that don't carry 'the built with XCode tag' (or whatever)?

     

    The problem is that it's not just about the apps. I think part of the reason that Mac sales are increasing is because you need to buy one to write apps for the iPhone. I reckon Apple will want to protect that market too.

     

     

    No danger of that...  the tools you need to build, sign, and test an iPhone application (even if Microsoft produced a Silverlight runtime for iPhone) only run on OSX.  Unless you're proposing that Microsoft steal or reverse engineer the proprietary parts of the toolchain (mostly related to signing, packaging, and testing), which would likely result in a long, protracted legal battle.

     

    I doubt that iPhone app developers contribute a significant amount to Mac sales, simply because developers are such a small portion of the population.  Even Apple's 5% marketshare amounts to millions of users; only a small fraction of that will be people who know anything about software development.

  • User profile image
    rhm

    CannotResolveSymbol said:
    Ray7 said:
    *snip*

    No danger of that...  the tools you need to build, sign, and test an iPhone application (even if Microsoft produced a Silverlight runtime for iPhone) only run on OSX.  Unless you're proposing that Microsoft steal or reverse engineer the proprietary parts of the toolchain (mostly related to signing, packaging, and testing), which would likely result in a long, protracted legal battle.

     

    I doubt that iPhone app developers contribute a significant amount to Mac sales, simply because developers are such a small portion of the population.  Even Apple's 5% marketshare amounts to millions of users; only a small fraction of that will be people who know anything about software development.

    Actually all Apple's iPhone toolchain is open source and even if it wasn't, it runs ARM code with industry standard executable format. And the signing isn't some magical process - it's pased on standard public key techniques.  The only thing you miss out on by not using the official Mac based tools is a quick way to get the app bundle on the device without going through iTunes and the native debugging support. Neither of which are a major concern if you're coding to a virtual machine that's available on the desktop.

     

    Supposedly Adobe will make it possible to generate signed app bundles ready for upload to iTunes Connect using Flash on the PC. It's possible Apple will come up with a way to block it, but I wouldn't make too many assumptions.

  • User profile image
    Ion Todirel

    rhm said:
    CannotResolveSymbol said:
    *snip*

    Actually all Apple's iPhone toolchain is open source and even if it wasn't, it runs ARM code with industry standard executable format. And the signing isn't some magical process - it's pased on standard public key techniques.  The only thing you miss out on by not using the official Mac based tools is a quick way to get the app bundle on the device without going through iTunes and the native debugging support. Neither of which are a major concern if you're coding to a virtual machine that's available on the desktop.

     

    Supposedly Adobe will make it possible to generate signed app bundles ready for upload to iTunes Connect using Flash on the PC. It's possible Apple will come up with a way to block it, but I wouldn't make too many assumptions.

    > Actually all Apple's iPhone toolchain is open source?

     

    It is? I was under the impression you need to be in the developer program to get it. At least that is written all over Apple's web site.

  • User profile image
    rhm

    Ion Todirel said:
    rhm said:
    *snip*

    > Actually all Apple's iPhone toolchain is open source?

     

    It is? I was under the impression you need to be in the developer program to get it. At least that is written all over Apple's web site.

    The whole SDK can be downloaded by anyone - all you need to do is register. It's only the beta SDKs that are only available to paying members.

     

    The tools like compiler, linker, etc. are all GNU stuff. There is already a toolchain setup that runs on PCs, but it doesn't have any signing component so it will only target jailbroken phones. And it doesn't have the Apple libraries/headers because they obviously aren't open source, but people have written mostly-working open source versions of them.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    If anyone will accomplish this it will probably be the Mono team. Microsoft doesn't have too much interest in platforms they do not directly own. To even port Silverlight to OS X was a stretch.

Conversation locked

This conversation has been locked by the site admins. No new comments can be made.