Coffeehouse Thread

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Hello World

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  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    I need to perform some CRUD with an Oracle backend via Java as the web service is not interoperable. I have just received an SDK that contains 10 or so pretty bog standard Java methods that read like C#.

     

    What is the best IDE for Java (I'm thinking something simple like C# express) that I can use to create a simple console application? Can I use this same IDE to import a bunch of Java web API's and make the calls or am I going to need a mish-mash of add ons?

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Eclipse EE.

     

    Don't go near NetBeans.

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    W3bbo said:

    Eclipse EE.

     

    Don't go near NetBeans.

    NetBeans isn't that bad nowadays.

     

    I don't know which I'd actually use for Java development if I were doing that kind of stuff, though...  haven't used either for Java dev in a while.  Used Eclipse for C/C++ and Netbeans for Python recently, though.

  • User profile image
    mstefan

    I'd second that vote for Eclipse.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    I'm starting a new job that does Java development so I'll let you know what they use.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Bass said:

    I'm starting a new job that does Java development so I'll let you know what they use.

    I think I'd slowly go insane if I had to use Java for anything large-scale. The platform is alright, and hell... I'm even growing a bit on Swing, but I just miss the language's syntactic sugar like Properties and Events and first-class support for Generics.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    W3bbo said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*

    I think I'd slowly go insane if I had to use Java for anything large-scale. The platform is alright, and hell... I'm even growing a bit on Swing, but I just miss the language's syntactic sugar like Properties and Events and first-class support for Generics.

    I don't disagree. But the compensation package and scope of the software project itself is awesome enough that the languages/tools they use doesn't really matter to me. Could be in brainf**k for all I care.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    Let me just add another vote for Eclipse.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Emacs

     

     

     

    *chortle*

  • User profile image
    mstefan

    blowdart said:

    Emacs

     

     

     

    *chortle*

    You didn't just write that.

     

  • User profile image
    MasterPi

    mstefan said:
    blowdart said:
    *snip*

    You didn't just write that.

     

    Yeah...vim ftw.

  • User profile image
    TommyCarlier

    MasterPie said:
    mstefan said:
    *snip*

    Yeah...vim ftw.

    Funny thing. I'm in the process of learning vim. The modal behavior is something that's a bit hard to get used to. At the same time, I'm also learning Python, which is easier to learn than vim. I've been a .NET-developer for years now, and I want to expand my horizon and skills a bit.

    Anyone else here using vim that can give me some tips?

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    I used Eclipse for a bit and didn't like it, but that's just me. I'd try it or NetBeans. Those are the two big ones.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    I worked at a place that used Emacs for almost all their development (except for me, the lone .NET developer). It is actually a extremely powerful IDE in the right hands, but it wasn't something I really took time to figure out.


    I am procifient in Vim however. Vim is pretty user friendly believe it or not. Just follow the tutorial that is bundled with Vim. If you are using Ubuntu, a stripped down Vim is bundled with the OS (vim-tiny), which has slightly more features then Notepad. You should install the vim-full package and optionally the vim-gtk package, if you want to get all the IDE features for Vim.

     

    However if I do Python development (or really anything other then .NET), I'm using Geany. As an IDE it has the perfect balance of features and simplicity, in my opinion. It is not quite as powerful as Vim or Emacs, but it does have the advantage of having almost zero learning curve.

  • User profile image
    Ion Todirel

    blowdart said:

    Emacs

     

     

     

    *chortle*

    Emacs, Vim and the family are not IDEs, perhaps you missed the part where he asked for an IDE? Smiley I don't get it when people complain that Visual Studio is slow, blah blah, then they compare it to Vim and Emacs, it's not fair to compare a rich IDE with a plain text editor. If you do that you can as well compare Visual Studio with notepad, which one do you think is faster?

  • User profile image
    Ion Todirel

    Web services are supposed to offer interoperability, that's one of their biggest sells. Why those of yours aren't? Just wondering.

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    Ion Todirel said:

    Web services are supposed to offer interoperability, that's one of their biggest sells. Why those of yours aren't? Just wondering.

    Yes they are, it's just that they have not gotten round to do this yet. Oracle offers something called metro that the Oracle world are beginning to embrace but not yet for me.

     

    Most web services use XML, but that does not necessarily mean that they are implemented for people to consume as XML. It's almost like a web service with a dataset which is fine for .NET clients but Java cannot understand it (if only they have used POCO's).

     

    I managed to get Eclipse installed and write the "Hello World" program last night, and it looks to be very powerful. Lacking the integration and beauty of Visual Studio of course (Dev 10 is beautiful), but I'll look at the online tutorials and should be able to make some headway. I had thought eclipse was just a Linux C/C++ IDE.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    vesuvius said:
    Ion Todirel said:
    *snip*

    Yes they are, it's just that they have not gotten round to do this yet. Oracle offers something called metro that the Oracle world are beginning to embrace but not yet for me.

     

    Most web services use XML, but that does not necessarily mean that they are implemented for people to consume as XML. It's almost like a web service with a dataset which is fine for .NET clients but Java cannot understand it (if only they have used POCO's).

     

    I managed to get Eclipse installed and write the "Hello World" program last night, and it looks to be very powerful. Lacking the integration and beauty of Visual Studio of course (Dev 10 is beautiful), but I'll look at the online tutorials and should be able to make some headway. I had thought eclipse was just a Linux C/C++ IDE.

    Eclipse is pretty much entirely pure Java, btw.

     

    Anyway, there are a few UI niggles that remain, even in the latest version: "Package Explorer", "Project Explorer", and "Navigator" on the surface seem to be the same thing, but in reality Project Explorer supplants the Navigator, and there are language-specific Explorer such as "PHP Explorer" and "Script Explorer" and for Java the "Package Explorer" which supplant the Project Explorer but only in those languages, which is why you need to take the time to set-up different IDE Perspectives.

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