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How do you connect WMC wirelessly to TV

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  • User profile image
    Doctor Who

    I've gotten the idea, watching This Week on Channel 9, that it is possible to connect one's PC, running either Vista or Windows 7, to one's PC wirelessly.  Especially, I've gotten the feeling that it's possible to stream whatever it is you watching from Windows Media Center to the TV.

     

    But how?

     

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Depends on whether or not the TV supports DLNA well enough to act as a remote rendering device, otherwise you'll have to stick with using MCE Extender boxes.

     

    I wouldn't personally go with wireless: for 1080 video I'd stick with GigE. Besides a TV is a static object, there's no downside to jacking in some Cat6.

  • User profile image
    Doctor Who

    W3bbo said:

    Depends on whether or not the TV supports DLNA well enough to act as a remote rendering device, otherwise you'll have to stick with using MCE Extender boxes.

     

    I wouldn't personally go with wireless: for 1080 video I'd stick with GigE. Besides a TV is a static object, there's no downside to jacking in some Cat6.

    OK, that just brings up other questions.  What is DLNA?  (I've no idea if my HDTV supports that or not.)

     

    For the sake of argument I'll assume my PC doesn't support DLNA; so what is a MCE Extender box?  Sounds like it could be more than one sort of thing.

     

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    Doctor Who said:
    W3bbo said:
    *snip*

    OK, that just brings up other questions.  What is DLNA?  (I've no idea if my HDTV supports that or not.)

     

    For the sake of argument I'll assume my PC doesn't support DLNA; so what is a MCE Extender box?  Sounds like it could be more than one sort of thing.

     

    The only currently produced media center extender is the Xbox 360.

     

    There is also Intel's "WiDi" but that needs to be supported by the computer (Intel 5-series chipset) and you need a receiver box hooked up to the TV (all I could find was the Netgear Push2TV PVT1000). Nevermind, it looks like you need to buy a "Blue Label 2.0" laptop.

     

    DLNA lets TVs stream certain files from another DLNA device, but a lot of them are limited to photos and music right now. It's a pretty new technology.

     

    If you want the computer on the TV, the most reliable way to do it is to hard-wire it. Before I built my HTPC, I had a VGA cable coiled up behind the TV for hooking up the laptop.

  • User profile image
    Bas

    All these extenders and DLNA things all seem to work in certain cases except the one you want. I've given up on them and just permanently hooked up a Media Center PC to my TV. No limitations on what file formats you can stream or where you can play stuff from: everything just works. All that streaming and extending business is fine but in my opinion Microsoft should focus on getting full WMC on set top boxes or embedded in TV's.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    spivonious said:
    Doctor Who said:
    *snip*

    The only currently produced media center extender is the Xbox 360.

     

    There is also Intel's "WiDi" but that needs to be supported by the computer (Intel 5-series chipset) and you need a receiver box hooked up to the TV (all I could find was the Netgear Push2TV PVT1000). Nevermind, it looks like you need to buy a "Blue Label 2.0" laptop.

     

    DLNA lets TVs stream certain files from another DLNA device, but a lot of them are limited to photos and music right now. It's a pretty new technology.

     

    If you want the computer on the TV, the most reliable way to do it is to hard-wire it. Before I built my HTPC, I had a VGA cable coiled up behind the TV for hooking up the laptop.

    I agree with the HTPC idea, but watch out: some HDTVs despite having 1080 panels with HDMI inputs actually apply overscan to digital inputs. I got burned: you'd think Sony wouldn't screw people over, but my 37" Sony Bravia always applies overscan to all HDMI inputs with no option to disable it (not even on the Service Menu). It means I have to use VGA, but if I use a short cable there shouldn't be any analogue interference problems.

  • User profile image
    Bas

    W3bbo said:
    spivonious said:
    *snip*

    I agree with the HTPC idea, but watch out: some HDTVs despite having 1080 panels with HDMI inputs actually apply overscan to digital inputs. I got burned: you'd think Sony wouldn't screw people over, but my 37" Sony Bravia always applies overscan to all HDMI inputs with no option to disable it (not even on the Service Menu). It means I have to use VGA, but if I use a short cable there shouldn't be any analogue interference problems.

    you'd think Sony wouldn't screw people over

     

    Ha ha ha.

  • User profile image
    CKurt

    Doctor Who said:
    W3bbo said:
    *snip*

    OK, that just brings up other questions.  What is DLNA?  (I've no idea if my HDTV supports that or not.)

     

    For the sake of argument I'll assume my PC doesn't support DLNA; so what is a MCE Extender box?  Sounds like it could be more than one sort of thing.

     

    Very Basic:

    If your tv has an Ethernet Jack that is a good start, but currently Sony Internet Tv en Philips NetTV do not suport DNLA so you won't be able to stream to that tv. They even don't allow network access in there 'internet tv' apps. It's a proriatary menu showing links to website's and youtube.

     

    The is only ONE 'Certified for Windows 7' tv on the market so far... So you'll have to wait a bit. An XBox 360 however is a good extender but it seems like some people here have problems with the smoothness of it all ?

  • User profile image
    Doctor Who

    CKurt said:
    Doctor Who said:
    *snip*

    Very Basic:

    If your tv has an Ethernet Jack that is a good start, but currently Sony Internet Tv en Philips NetTV do not suport DNLA so you won't be able to stream to that tv. They even don't allow network access in there 'internet tv' apps. It's a proriatary menu showing links to website's and youtube.

     

    The is only ONE 'Certified for Windows 7' tv on the market so far... So you'll have to wait a bit. An XBox 360 however is a good extender but it seems like some people here have problems with the smoothness of it all ?

    My HDTV (a Vizio, purchased just 6 months ago) doesn't have an Ethernet jack.  So, it seems that the only choices I have is either connect on PC directly to the TV with either a VGA or (if I'm lucky) an HDMI cable, or I use an Xbox.  I don't have an Xbox.  From this conversation it looks as though an Xbox can be accessed wirelessly.  I'm guessing that I can set up an Xbox to receive signals from my home's wireless router, and then I'm guessing setting up some sort of communication between my PC and the Xbox.  Is that correct?

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    CKurt said:
    Doctor Who said:
    *snip*

    Very Basic:

    If your tv has an Ethernet Jack that is a good start, but currently Sony Internet Tv en Philips NetTV do not suport DNLA so you won't be able to stream to that tv. They even don't allow network access in there 'internet tv' apps. It's a proriatary menu showing links to website's and youtube.

     

    The is only ONE 'Certified for Windows 7' tv on the market so far... So you'll have to wait a bit. An XBox 360 however is a good extender but it seems like some people here have problems with the smoothness of it all ?

    I think DNLA and other things like that are fundamentally flawed: the companies that make desirable hardware who are market-leaders tend to also have a vested interest in their own home content delivery platforms (Microsoft: MCE, Sony: Bravia/PS3, Apple: iPod, AppleTV, etc), so you'll never see them work together on anything unless their survival depends on it (e.g. CD-ROM, DVD, etc) or if it's something totally fundamental or controlled by Hollywood media companies who hate everyone (e.g. HDMI or Blu-Ray).

     

    I gave up on the dream of a hassle-free networked home, if you want to get anything done properly you'll have to build a HTPC. Fortunately it isn't too hard (just a matter of finding the right fan-free, low-power components and a nice-looking case).

     

    You could buy a second-hand Xbox off eBay for £5 and load XBMC on it. XBMC has very positive reviews.

  • User profile image
    CKurt

    Doctor Who said:
    CKurt said:
    *snip*

    My HDTV (a Vizio, purchased just 6 months ago) doesn't have an Ethernet jack.  So, it seems that the only choices I have is either connect on PC directly to the TV with either a VGA or (if I'm lucky) an HDMI cable, or I use an Xbox.  I don't have an Xbox.  From this conversation it looks as though an Xbox can be accessed wirelessly.  I'm guessing that I can set up an Xbox to receive signals from my home's wireless router, and then I'm guessing setting up some sort of communication between my PC and the Xbox.  Is that correct?

    @ W3bbo: you make it seem as if there is nothing that works today. I know it's not ideal, but if a product supports DNLA it can be networked and be hassle-free, afaik

     

    @Doctro Who: You are correct. The current XBox Arcade in europe costs about 150 euro (you don't need the Elite for media center support). But it had an ethernet jack by default. So you will have to buy the wireless extender from XBox etself (n network). Setup is pretty 'easy' of you know something about computers.

     

    Next indeed is connecting a pc to your tv, but that is more something real enthousiast do. They make there own pc with a very silent fan and use it only in media center mode. (or something simular like Boxee or XBMC).

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