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Technet

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  • User profile image
    spivonious

    Can someone from MS offer a statement as to the legality of using Technet software on your primary machine at home? Paul Thurrott has been pushing this for a while now, but it was my understanding that all of the software was for evaluation only, and that installing it on your main machine at home would constitute "production" use.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Not a lawyer. Not speaking in any offical capacity.

     

    The  TechNet FAQ is even clearer in its restrictions than the MSDN one.

     

    ....which you can use for evaluation and testing purposes to help you stay current and recreate customer issues....

     

    The TechNet Subscription license terms grant one user the right to install the program software on any devices, including those located at his or her home, but the user must fully comply with all the license terms no matter where the device is located.  In other words, one user may install and use the evaluation software, only to evaluate it. You may not use it in a live operating environment, a staging or production environment, or with data that has not been sufficiently backed up. You may not use the evaluation software for software development or in an application development environment.

     

    And then they go on to define what you can do

     

    TechNet Subscription software may be tested to determine the following:
    Install/Uninstall – Time and process required for full, partial or upgrade software install/uninstall processes and system integration.
    Recovery – Capacity for software to recover from crashes, hardware failures, or other catastrophic problems.
    Security – Defining software’s ability to protect against unauthorized internal or external access.
    Compatibility – Gauging software performance in existing or new hardware, software, operating system or network environments.
    Comparison – Evaluating software to determine product strengths and weaknesses as compared to previous versions or similar products.
    Usability – Assessing satisfaction among end users, observing end user utilization and understanding user interaction scenarios.
    Performance – Ensuring software will perform as expected to requirements.
    Stability – Estimating individual software’s ability to perform consistently, relative to system demands.
    Environment – Determining software settings while software is being evaluated by end users in existing infrastructure.    

     

    The license is, well, the usual legal stuff.

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    blowdart said:

    Not a lawyer. Not speaking in any offical capacity.

     

    The  TechNet FAQ is even clearer in its restrictions than the MSDN one.

     

    ....which you can use for evaluation and testing purposes to help you stay current and recreate customer issues....

     

    The TechNet Subscription license terms grant one user the right to install the program software on any devices, including those located at his or her home, but the user must fully comply with all the license terms no matter where the device is located.  In other words, one user may install and use the evaluation software, only to evaluate it. You may not use it in a live operating environment, a staging or production environment, or with data that has not been sufficiently backed up. You may not use the evaluation software for software development or in an application development environment.

     

    And then they go on to define what you can do

     

    TechNet Subscription software may be tested to determine the following:
    Install/Uninstall – Time and process required for full, partial or upgrade software install/uninstall processes and system integration.
    Recovery – Capacity for software to recover from crashes, hardware failures, or other catastrophic problems.
    Security – Defining software’s ability to protect against unauthorized internal or external access.
    Compatibility – Gauging software performance in existing or new hardware, software, operating system or network environments.
    Comparison – Evaluating software to determine product strengths and weaknesses as compared to previous versions or similar products.
    Usability – Assessing satisfaction among end users, observing end user utilization and understanding user interaction scenarios.
    Performance – Ensuring software will perform as expected to requirements.
    Stability – Estimating individual software’s ability to perform consistently, relative to system demands.
    Environment – Determining software settings while software is being evaluated by end users in existing infrastructure.    

     

    The license is, well, the usual legal stuff.

    Wow, so even more restrictive than I thought.

     

    I emailed Paul and here's what he said:

     

    What you quote below is the official stance from Microsoft. You're supposed to use it to evaluate software. It's aimed at IT pros that can't afford to purchase tons of Microsoft software for use at home, even though they may want to "play" with it to see how things work. You can't share it with others. You can't use it for work. You can't do a lot of things. But you *can* use it. And given that the license specifically calls out home usage, I think it is very clear.
     
    Look, they're not idiots. They know how people are using their software, and if they wanted to prevent this, they would. That they just made it even cheaper speaks volumes, I think.

     

    I'd be fine with him using it that way, but he has encouraged others to get TechNet subscriptions for the past couple podcasts of Windows Weekly, as well as on his website.

     

    I have to admit, the new $200 Technet subscription looks very appealing. I mean, unlimited copies for the cost of one retail license of Windows 7? What's to stop me from getting it, installing it at home and "evaluating its performance" for the next 5 years?

  • User profile image
    rhm

    spivonious said:
    blowdart said:
    *snip*

    Wow, so even more restrictive than I thought.

     

    I emailed Paul and here's what he said:

     

    What you quote below is the official stance from Microsoft. You're supposed to use it to evaluate software. It's aimed at IT pros that can't afford to purchase tons of Microsoft software for use at home, even though they may want to "play" with it to see how things work. You can't share it with others. You can't use it for work. You can't do a lot of things. But you *can* use it. And given that the license specifically calls out home usage, I think it is very clear.
     
    Look, they're not idiots. They know how people are using their software, and if they wanted to prevent this, they would. That they just made it even cheaper speaks volumes, I think.

     

    I'd be fine with him using it that way, but he has encouraged others to get TechNet subscriptions for the past couple podcasts of Windows Weekly, as well as on his website.

     

    I have to admit, the new $200 Technet subscription looks very appealing. I mean, unlimited copies for the cost of one retail license of Windows 7? What's to stop me from getting it, installing it at home and "evaluating its performance" for the next 5 years?

    Nothing by the sounds of it. But the way I look at it is like this: I really want Photoshop CS5, but it's pretty expensive. I could get my sister, who's a teacher, to buy the academic license for me and save 4/5ths of the price. But since I wouldn't be complying with the licence terms I might as well have used a crack instead and paid nothing at all.

     

    I'm not one for bashing people for using unlicenced software, esp. if it's only in a casual way that makes no difference to the publisher because they haven't realistically lost a sale. But still, if you do care at all about not using pirated software then you have to get the proper licence - anything less doesn't make sense.

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