Coffeehouse Thread

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Desktop sharing in windows

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  • User profile image
    GurliGebis

    Hey.

    I was wandering if it is possible to let 3 people see my desktop (like remote assistance) at the same time, so I can show the people on my team at school something while we talk about it using etc. Skype?

    (No remote controlling is needed, now viewing).

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    See NetMeeting, it has desktop sharing software built in... based on the original RDP however, so it isn't as fast or flexible as the current RDP5.1

    Not recommended for use over high-latency connections, you have been warned.

    However... look into "Application Sharing" that Windows Messenger supports, I don't know if its just windowed-TermServ or the program literally runs on the other computers though.

  • User profile image
    mOOney

    You could use RealVNC www.realvnc.com it allows you to setup op the vncserver to treat each connection as shared so the other viewers won't get disconnected.

  • User profile image
    GurliGebis

    I would like to not having to use third party applications for the desktop sharing part.

  • User profile image
    Manip

    Why?

  • User profile image
    GurliGebis

    Should be without installing additional software, since I would also like to be able to show stuff to people who aren't very technical minded, thats why I prefer RDP over VNC, since it comes with windows.

  • User profile image
    dotnetjunkie

    Also, RDP is MUCH faster than VNC!

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Terminal Services (RDP) for Windows XP is single-user and locks the console session.

    Do you really think Microsoft would include desktop sharing software in Windows? Nope Smiley

    As I said, there's always that "Application Sharing" part of Windows Messenger. But watch out, it doesn't work well with NATs.

  • User profile image
    dotnetjunkie

    It works very well over NAT if your router supports UPnP, which most modern routers/NAT devices (even ICS) do!

  • User profile image
    Manip

    dotnetjunkie wrote:
    It works very well over NAT if your router supports UPnP, which most modern routers/NAT devices (even ICS) do!


    Which is highly insecure.

  • User profile image
    Cider

    Manip wrote:
    dotnetjunkie wrote: It works very well over NAT if your router supports UPnP, which most modern routers/NAT devices (even ICS) do!


    Which is highly insecure.


    Hell, if we are talking security, using Real VNC's over the Internet isn't exactly recommended.

  • User profile image
    dotnetjunkie

    And if security is an issue, you can always go over VPN, which is a standard part of Windows. Smiley

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Cider wrote:
    Hell, if we are talking security, using Real VNC's over the Internet isn't exactly recommended.


    I switched to TermServ (the full thing, not "XP Pro Remote Desktop"), and there's no looking back now... it's like 3 times faster over 256k w/ 50ms lag.

  • User profile image
    Catatonic

    You should be able to use Windows Media Encoder to capture your screen and stream it live.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Catatonic wrote:
    You should be able to use Windows Media Encoder to capture your screen and stream it live.


    That's one option, yes.

    But think about the system requirements needed to capture and encode a 1024x768 bitmap at 24fps or higher in real time.

    Even if you get it to output a steady 12fps, you probably wont have any CPU% left to run any programs.

    Note that you cannot stream the media unless you've got Streaming Media Services installed on an appropriate WS2003 box. Also note that this is practically impossible over a connection slower than gigabit. Unless you've managed to watch a video with 1024x768 reso over DSL, which I seriously doubt.

  • User profile image
    Catatonic

    You do not need a server to do this. Windows Media Encoder will stream video directly from a Win XP Pro box. It also has a screen capture codec that compresses the full screen into less than 150 kilobits/second at 10 fps.

    Tell Windows Media Encoder to use "Screen Capture" as the video device, and whatever audio device you want. On the Output tab, select "pull from encoder" and choose a port number that the clients will connect to. (They can use HTTP or MMS.) Then on the Compression tab, choose Windows Media server (streaming) - Video: Screen Capture (CBR), then choose a bit rate & frame rate.

  • User profile image
    GurliGebis

    Catatonic wrote:
    You should be able to use Windows Media Encoder to capture your screen and stream it live.


    Okay, that's really nice, why didn't I think of that, thanks Smiley

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