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What would you do for MS?

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  • User profile image
    rjdohnert

    A few years ago I tried EVERYTHING in my power to work for Microsoft.  That company was where I wanted to be.  Well, I didnt get on.  No bitterness towards MS for that.  Well since then I have started my own business, doing good.  The years have been rocky to say the least.  I laughed, I cried and I have had some heart breaks.  Last night I was having drinks with 2 of my employees and friends and we were talking about the state of technology.  One of them is a Open Source purist who think MS is dead and not as important as they once were, I disagreed and he asked me if offered a job would I go work for Microsoft.

     

    I would

     

    Microsoft has always been my dream job.  Its one of those things that I know I will do, its on my bucket list.   Microsoft has always had interesting projects and they do interesting things.  To go work there now, they would have to buy out my business.  The state of my clients prevents me from just dropping everything.

     

    If you could work for MS, what would you want to do?  What department would you want to work in?

  • User profile image
    C7326487236​43

    I was at Building 1 in Silicon Valley on La Avenida Street for unrelated business a few days ago. People walked by and said hello to the secretary. She never answers anyone.

     

    That summarizes Microsoft in a sentence.

    Their whole PR campaign is like Data from Star Trek. A heartless, mindless robot that crushes the bones in your hand shaking it. None the less it spends hundreds of millions of dollars trying to convince the public that it's human and compassionate(about something or other).

     

    Not trying to start a flame war. Just airing my opinion.

     

    And to answer the question in the subject, I wouldn't do jack sh*t for Microsoft.

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    I'd love to work there. Windows division or some game.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    If it turns out that I'm not elite PhD material, I'd be happy settling for an SDE position on a user-facing product, but ideally I'd like to form a roving "death squad" that hops between MS product teams to eliminate UI issues, something that's been irking me since Vista came out.

     

    But if I do get admitted into the PhD programme I'm aiming for (in a little over a years' time from now) and, of course, I graduate in reasonable time, then I'd like to land a Researcher position at MSR where I can persue my research interests in computer vision and usability.

     

    I'd then build a custom designed house in a three-acre hillside plot to the east of the Redmond campus and alternatively hang-glide or drive a Lambo into work.

     

    Dream on.

  • User profile image
    littleguru

    Microsoft is fun to work at. I haven't been at building 1 in Silicon Valley - didn't even know that there's a building 1 down there - but our secretaries in building 34 are very nice. Always greet, smile and chat a bit with you. I like it.

     

    It's interesting that there's an idea of Microsoft being "a robot". Probably it's because the company is so big - and this is my personal opinion (as always) Tongue Out What I see is that we are rather a ton of small companies within one company. Small agile teams (at least in Azure, which is where I have visibility) working on interesting projects.

     

    So far, after 1 year in Redmond, I can say that it is really a dream job. I enjoy going to work and I work long hours because it's so much fun. Our team has startup mentality with a lot of people who want to build interesting things, thinking about simplifying APIs and interaction with software and how to make things open for everyone.

  • User profile image
    ManipUni

    The Kernel Team or Core UI teams would be fun. But based on my qualifications more likely Exchange, Biztalk, or even Office.

     

    But frankly I am being disingenuous if I said I wanted to work for Microsoft. If the pay was right and the job was good, I absolutely would, but it would just be another job. While Microsoft does some very good stuff, I'm not sure how much I would enjoy the middle management culture within the company and the politics of it all.

     

    Google would be higher on my list. Apple would be much lower on my list.

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    W3bbo said:

    If it turns out that I'm not elite PhD material, I'd be happy settling for an SDE position on a user-facing product, but ideally I'd like to form a roving "death squad" that hops between MS product teams to eliminate UI issues, something that's been irking me since Vista came out.

     

    But if I do get admitted into the PhD programme I'm aiming for (in a little over a years' time from now) and, of course, I graduate in reasonable time, then I'd like to land a Researcher position at MSR where I can persue my research interests in computer vision and usability.

     

    I'd then build a custom designed house in a three-acre hillside plot to the east of the Redmond campus and alternatively hang-glide or drive a Lambo into work.

     

    Dream on.

    Research students are not paid as well as you think, and their inventions usually are swallowed up by the company or academic institution they work for. Juxtapose this to this 16 year old that is already on his way.

     

    Research pays you well in terms of distinction amongst colleagues, and reputation globally. I am now getting to the stage where I cannot really move up the pay scale unless I move up into management, or start my own business up. I think the best position is in being able to create a software product that can allow me to go work in a charity shop 2 days a week, but still afford me a comfortable life

     

    Even PhD students reach a point of saturation, most never release a product or work that is of any real financial value, it's important you recognise this, as it can be very challenging working on projects for years that nearly make it. I have been and am working with researchers, so I know just how frustrating it can be seeing products fail - most universities are mini-corporations now so you may not have to go very far to get to a user facing product. You need to be very strong mentally as well as intelligent, cos' it's a hard slog

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    vesuvius said:
    W3bbo said:
    *snip*

    Research students are not paid as well as you think, and their inventions usually are swallowed up by the company or academic institution they work for. Juxtapose this to this 16 year old that is already on his way.

     

    Research pays you well in terms of distinction amongst colleagues, and reputation globally. I am now getting to the stage where I cannot really move up the pay scale unless I move up into management, or start my own business up. I think the best position is in being able to create a software product that can allow me to go work in a charity shop 2 days a week, but still afford me a comfortable life

     

    Even PhD students reach a point of saturation, most never release a product or work that is of any real financial value, it's important you recognise this, as it can be very challenging working on projects for years that nearly make it. I have been and am working with researchers, so I know just how frustrating it can be seeing products fail - most universities are mini-corporations now so you may not have to go very far to get to a user facing product. You need to be very strong mentally as well as intelligent, cos' it's a hard slog

    That's why I'm planning on entering the industry right after I graduate, rather than linger-on in academia as a postdoc.

     

    According to Glassdoor, Researcher's salaries are pretty generous, whilst the lower-end of the range is comparativly low, I'm surprised at how high the average is.

  • User profile image
    ManipUni

    W3bbo said:
    vesuvius said:
    *snip*

    That's why I'm planning on entering the industry right after I graduate, rather than linger-on in academia as a postdoc.

     

    According to Glassdoor, Researcher's salaries are pretty generous, whilst the lower-end of the range is comparativly low, I'm surprised at how high the average is.

    Since Microsoft Research mostly hires PhD grad's, I'm not sure that salary is high. Likely average for that level of qualifications.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    I don't think I'd enjoy working for Microsoft. The only division I really "respect" is Microsoft Research, and I don't qualify for that.

     

    Google was always my dream job. I don't think so anymore.

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    Bass said:

    I don't think I'd enjoy working for Microsoft. The only division I really "respect" is Microsoft Research, and I don't qualify for that.

     

    Google was always my dream job. I don't think so anymore.

    For now Wink

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    W3bbo said:
    vesuvius said:
    *snip*

    That's why I'm planning on entering the industry right after I graduate, rather than linger-on in academia as a postdoc.

     

    According to Glassdoor, Researcher's salaries are pretty generous, whilst the lower-end of the range is comparativly low, I'm surprised at how high the average is.

    Yes, but a few people with high salaries will skew the average.

     

    MS works with bands, and each band has it's own range. Moving up the lower bands (<62) is mainly a matter of exceeding expectations, but once you get to the level 63 hop it becomes a bit more challenging as your manager has to justify that leap to their peers. 63-64 needs skip level manager agreement, and again is justified with peers.  Mini microsoft has a good explanation/summary.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    vesuvius said:
    Bass said:
    *snip*

    For now Wink

    If I get a Ph.D. I'll probably work for my current employeer's research department. Right now I'm focusing on just getting a Masters degree, which is much easier.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    blowdart said:
    W3bbo said:
    *snip*

    Yes, but a few people with high salaries will skew the average.

     

    MS works with bands, and each band has it's own range. Moving up the lower bands (<62) is mainly a matter of exceeding expectations, but once you get to the level 63 hop it becomes a bit more challenging as your manager has to justify that leap to their peers. 63-64 needs skip level manager agreement, and again is justified with peers.  Mini microsoft has a good explanation/summary.

    Point taken, however it looks like the outliers are at the bottom, and that it really is a very well compensated position. If I restrict the salary search to between 0 and 3 years' experience, the minimum is $97k, when I seached for 10+ years experience, it rose to $107k.

     

    ...which leads me to believe that pay is not a function of seniority at MSR.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    W3bbo said:
    blowdart said:
    *snip*

    Point taken, however it looks like the outliers are at the bottom, and that it really is a very well compensated position. If I restrict the salary search to between 0 and 3 years' experience, the minimum is $97k, when I seached for 10+ years experience, it rose to $107k.

     

    ...which leads me to believe that pay is not a function of seniority at MSR.

    The bottom might be interns. Who knows, the whole pay thing is a mystery to me I'll discover the delights of in a few weeks.

  • User profile image
    C7326487236​43

    W3bbo said:
    blowdart said:
    *snip*

    Point taken, however it looks like the outliers are at the bottom, and that it really is a very well compensated position. If I restrict the salary search to between 0 and 3 years' experience, the minimum is $97k, when I seached for 10+ years experience, it rose to $107k.

     

    ...which leads me to believe that pay is not a function of seniority at MSR.

    That isn't that much money for the area.

    I know a few people from the mid-west or srilanka or something must be like, wow 100k, that's so much money in my currency.

    The reality is 100k, at least at the Mountain View campus, will probably buy you a down payment on a very small and sh*tty condo you will be paying for the next 30 years. You honestly need to make way more than that.

     

    I'm not singling out Microsoft here. 100k is the base for a lot of other tech companies that regularly hire programmers.

     

    What we need is to have these companies start letting people work from home, and only go to meetings once every 2 months.
    That way programmers could literally work for a company like Microsoft, but live in the mid-west or Tibet where their modest 100k/year would buy them something close to a mansion with an army of hired help if you consider the latter.

     

    It would seem that only very senior people, such as directors are allowed to teleconference into meetings at most companies, and that's sad.

    That should change. It would also change the economies in Redmond, and many places in California that depend on these people getting economically screwed because they live in those areas.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    C732648723643 said:
    W3bbo said:
    *snip*

    That isn't that much money for the area.

    I know a few people from the mid-west or srilanka or something must be like, wow 100k, that's so much money in my currency.

    The reality is 100k, at least at the Mountain View campus, will probably buy you a down payment on a very small and sh*tty condo you will be paying for the next 30 years. You honestly need to make way more than that.

     

    I'm not singling out Microsoft here. 100k is the base for a lot of other tech companies that regularly hire programmers.

     

    What we need is to have these companies start letting people work from home, and only go to meetings once every 2 months.
    That way programmers could literally work for a company like Microsoft, but live in the mid-west or Tibet where their modest 100k/year would buy them something close to a mansion with an army of hired help if you consider the latter.

     

    It would seem that only very senior people, such as directors are allowed to teleconference into meetings at most companies, and that's sad.

    That should change. It would also change the economies in Redmond, and many places in California that depend on these people getting economically screwed because they live in those areas.

    Nice try, Beer;

     

    Anyway: the salaries are actually for the Redmond area. $100k a year for a late-20something is nothing to be sniffed at.

  • User profile image
    C7326487236​43

    W3bbo said:
    C732648723643 said:
    *snip*

    Nice try, Beer;

     

    Anyway: the salaries are actually for the Redmond area. $100k a year for a late-20something is nothing to be sniffed at.

    I am not Beer.

     

    You need to earn 100k/year, and get back to us about your luxurious lifestyle. I'll love to hear about it.

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