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The cloud taking over

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  • User profile image
    PerfectPhase

    Charles said:
    brian.shapiro said:
    *snip*

    Smiley

     

    Another trend we'll see is that of moving computation skyward. So, one of the promises of "cloud computing" is less the cloud aspect, per se, and more on computing -> Being able to farm out complex computations/calculations over giant data sets to 100,000 virtual computers, for example, is quite appealing (and there's still a lot of work to do across the cloud computing landscape to pull this off in ways that are reliable and efficient given a number of variables...). Further, imagine being able to process large media files (multiple encodings) in minutes, not hours.

     

    The cloud will be more than a means of offloading IT functions, processes, management and server applicaitions to distributed virtual environments managed by thrid parties (of course, this is VERY appealing for a number of reasons....).

     

    The future of computing is also what's going here, not just the future of business information technology.

     

    Sky.Compute();

    C

     

     

    One other thing, wonder if/when will azure start offering HPC nodes?

  • User profile image
    Charles

    PerfectPhase said:
    Charles said:
    *snip*

    One other thing, wonder if/when will azure start offering HPC nodes?

    I don't know.

    C

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    Charles said:
    PerfectPhase said:
    *snip*

    Good questions. I'd be disappointed if it doesn't someday become the case. I mean, we are so early in the cloud computing game that one has to assume technological advancements on the order to accomplish what we're talking about here -> "Please process this on 100,000 CPUs. Thank you." Smiley

    C

    for the "DO this big job" I think it needs to be more like how we ship a package.

     

    we pay for aspects of how we need / want the delivery to be executed.

     

    for example:

     

    for this job i need   priority == realtime then cost will be very very high.

    or Priority is low time will take longer but the cost will go down to a very low factor.

    the idea is that you do not say how many VM's or CPU's or RAM.

    let the system work that out. the higher the priority the higher the cost and the more hardware allocated to that job.

    as hardware gets faster and cheaper the number of cpu's to allocate for a given task will change.

     

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    I want cloud desktop to overtake local desktop.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
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  • User profile image
    xgamer

    Me thinks .... when we talk about cloud taking over ... there are two trends we may be talking about 

    1. Trend of Applications being  Web / Service enabled and hence moving away from Desktop to a browser but in a private hosted environment

    2. Trend of Application  being made to be hosted by third parties and being offered as SAAS, PAAS, etc etc

     

    I think first is already happening and will continue to happen especially for people who wants to have access to their data on the move, for business / enterprise which are enabling more customer self service or self information retrieval models....  I could quote the example of Airline industry which has gradually moved from Travel agent ( those unix terminal screens )  to web-based model  with a lot of customer self service ... effectively killing a large part of Travel Agent industry ...

     

    I think applications are / will move more and more of their data on the cloud ( though private ) for access at multiple points. Though network penetration, speed and technical illiteracy is the issue ... its just a matter of time ....

     

     

    The second trend about not owning those assets getting them thru SAAS,PAAS etc enterprise and entrusting third parties for it ... here as others have pointed out apart from connectivity... tendency of owning, privacy, lack of trust and many other factors are issues.

     

    However, I feel applications especially in core consumer area ( like storage(mainly backup), mail etc) , not so important business function applications like meeting, collaboration,  simpler customer management etc areas applications will move to third party cloud based offering ...

     

  • User profile image
    exoteric

    figuerres said:
    Charles said:
    *snip*

    for the "DO this big job" I think it needs to be more like how we ship a package.

     

    we pay for aspects of how we need / want the delivery to be executed.

     

    for example:

     

    for this job i need   priority == realtime then cost will be very very high.

    or Priority is low time will take longer but the cost will go down to a very low factor.

    the idea is that you do not say how many VM's or CPU's or RAM.

    let the system work that out. the higher the priority the higher the cost and the more hardware allocated to that job.

    as hardware gets faster and cheaper the number of cpu's to allocate for a given task will change.

     

    Sure, if you have an idea of the fixed cost of a task, you may be able to just say "maximally paralleize this computation".

     

    I wonder, in this comming age of utility computing, will there also be a market for reselling compute power?

     

    One could also imagine hardware, VM and JIT efficiency becomming an issue: the cloud service providers with the most efficient VMs and JITs will be better able to compete; add to that cloud scale economics, it could become important. Perhaps more of an issue for technical computing.

     

    To the extent that a desktop application doesn't need to interact with local hardware, it could be moved entirely into the cloud and video streamed back to the client. The economics of that may be poor though...

     

    The shift to cloud computing could also mean interesting things for hardware and processor manufacturers.

     

    Hollywood should be quite excited about cloud computing due to the possibility of on-demand scalability for rendering large complex 3D environments. Maybe that's also what the XCG is doing: designing and building special-purpose hardware for cloud-based technical computing (number crunching).

     

    What do you think?

  • User profile image
    Dr Herbie

    Jon Honeyball, in past issues of PC Pro made good points about legal jurisdiction with data stored on the cloud:  privacy of your customers could become compromised if the data is stored in a country where the government likes to snoop. You might find yourself suddenly in court over something which is perfectly legal in your country, but illegal elsewhere where your data has been stored without your knowledge.

     

    Other problems might also affect you: if you're a  UK company with your data on the cloud, you may find that the country in which your data is actually stored declares a new law which affects how you store your data.  You could even find that your data is spread over several countries all of which pass different, contradictory laws over data storage.  What are you going to do then?

     

    I think these complexities can be fixed (this may already be in process), but they show how complex this can get.

     

    Herbie

     

  • User profile image
    PerfectPhase

    Dr Herbie said:

    Jon Honeyball, in past issues of PC Pro made good points about legal jurisdiction with data stored on the cloud:  privacy of your customers could become compromised if the data is stored in a country where the government likes to snoop. You might find yourself suddenly in court over something which is perfectly legal in your country, but illegal elsewhere where your data has been stored without your knowledge.

     

    Other problems might also affect you: if you're a  UK company with your data on the cloud, you may find that the country in which your data is actually stored declares a new law which affects how you store your data.  You could even find that your data is spread over several countries all of which pass different, contradictory laws over data storage.  What are you going to do then?

     

    I think these complexities can be fixed (this may already be in process), but they show how complex this can get.

     

    Herbie

     

    The current Blackberry problems seem a good example of this

  • User profile image
    SlackmasterK

    I, for one, welcome our new alien overlords.

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