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Women in Engineering ?

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  • User profile image
    adnanrafik

    Do you agree with me?

    Have you seen or come across working with the women in the profession of engineering. Since 1997 I've seen very few women in engineering and I can count them on my fingeertips, hardly 8-10 females in I.T. Profession upto now. Astonishing ...isn't it?

    I have always this question in my mind Why. What is the reason?

    If we look around we find most of the women in the medical profession than in the marketing or customer relationship. We hardly find a women as a mechanical engineer or as an electrical engineer but we find many female doctors, dentisits, relationship manager etc.

    I didn't see a female as a Network Administrator.

    So what exactly is the reason?

    Don't they like Engineering?

    Don't they like Engineering (specific to I.T.)

    Is engineering very hard to them?

    Or

    don't they want to work in a workshop and the cloths greased. Smiley Have any girl imagined herself like this?

    so ....do we have the anser for this? Yes you ...TECH Guys........

    I think a women must have the answer for all of these questions. Do you?

  • User profile image
    MisterDonut

    Interesting note: I am in a Software Engineering masters degree. There were two women in a class I took once for degree completion. One was a great programmer. The other wanted nothing to do with programming at all. I asked why she was in the SE program. I got a nasty look. Never figured out why.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    I think this is a purely cultural thing. I can count the number of western women at the CompSci faculty on one hand (not counting secretaries and stuff, but including people from the masters and PhD programs, as well as academic staff). But if look at people from eastern Europe, the ratio men/women is much fairer. If we look at the far east, it's the other way around; out of all the Japanese and Chinese students and PhDs at Leiden CompSci, I guess 95% is female.

  • User profile image
    Tyler Brown

    I'd say that about 10% of the students in the Software Engineering program here at the University of Ottawa are female, and they are quite knowledgeable on the subject. I think that this is the beginning of a much larger influx of females in the IT industry.

  • User profile image
    Manip

    10 (absolute number) on my CS course here in the UK. I disagree that there is any kind of influx of women, just a very slow gradual rise. 

    I put it down to I.T. being a very unfashionable and in general boring industry to work in.. Partly down to a lot of women not getting the same "thrill" out of technology like their male counterparts do (which is almost certainly more environmental than biological as in Asia there are almost as many women in I.T. as men).

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    AFAIK, there's only 3 girls in my year doing the CompSci A-Level course, out of 45 or so students.

    Only 1 female in my Electronics course, 1 in my Mech Mathmatics class, and 4 in my Physics class.

    ...I'm guessing they all go and do arts subjects.

    Of course, one thing I've always wanted to know: What are arts (and "art" itself) good for?

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Manip wrote:
    Partly down to a lot of women not getting the same "thrill" out of technology like their male counterparts do


    You sure? What about the Orgasmatron?

    If that isn't getting a thrill out of technology, I don't know what is. Wink

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    It could be that Western women just don't like the tasks that are involved.  My company is very diverse in that we have quite a large number of IT people who's first language is not english.  We do have a few women in the IT arena, but they are support (i.e. they keep exchange or the network running). 

    One of them was actually a developer and she got out of it for this reason:  She found that the alpha male culture of programmers didn't fit her personality.  One of the reasons I like MSFT is that years ago, I read that if you wanted your idea to be the one that was used in the software, you had to argue (with Bill Gates, in some cases) and win.

    Obviously, MSFT is far too large for that now, but most companies aren't that large.  I've found the same thing, though.  What we do is creative, so coming up with a different way to do something, tends to trigger the ugly baby syndrome1. 

    This just doesn't seem to fit the personality traits of most women that I've met.  The woman I spoke to at work echoed this belief.

    1Ugly baby syndrome in it's simplest form occurs when someone tells you that your baby is ugly.  Imagine how pissed off you would be.  Replace 'baby' with 'idea' or 'software' and you get ugly baby syndrome.  "It may not be the best, but it's mine and you are insulting it".

  • User profile image
    coolhunter

    W3bbo wrote:
    What are arts (and "art" itself) good for?


    The soul.

  • User profile image
    Manip

    coolhunter wrote:
    W3bbo wrote: What are arts (and "art" itself) good for?


    The soul.


    I thought learning to be a professional artist was soul destroying?

  • User profile image
    coolhunter

    Professional artist?

    Isn't that an oxymoron??

  • User profile image
    footballism

    Sven Groot wrote:
    I think this is a purely cultural thing. I can count the number of western women at the CompSci faculty on one hand (not counting secretaries and stuff, but including people from the masters and PhD programs, as well as academic staff). But if look at people from eastern Europe, the ratio men/women is much fairer. If we look at the far east, it's the other way around; out of all the Japanese and Chinese students and PhDs at Leiden CompSci, I guess 95% is female.

       comparatively speaking,in China we do have a relatively larger percentage of women in the engineering,and that's one of the few blessings in a socialist economy.but if you look at what kinda attainments the women get in engineering,a lot of technological or scientific discovery is made by male professionals.for most female engineers,they typically have difficulty shining through in the technical industry,esp IT,Mechanical or Electronics industry etc...

  • User profile image
    footballism

    Manip wrote:

    I thought learning to be a professional artist was soul destroying?

       well one of the side effect the technological innovation have on our human society is that we just gradually overlook the artistic discovery and artistic advancement for our human beings.
       take China for example,the dancers,the writers,the painters etc are paid far less than those ppls in other professions.and I think we are steadily destroying one important aspect of our personalities,that is soul refining...

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    We don't pay our artists, musicians, dancers, too much, we pay the MPAA and RIAA too much.

  • User profile image
    will

    When I was studying my Bachelor of Computing course we had quite a number of female students in the course.

    This was from 2001-2003. Though this was not an "Engineering" course per say. It was still in the field of IT, which is the main thing.

    I noticed that many of the females in my group of friends though tended to go for the information systems type of subjects over the programming ones.

    Though there were a few that did indeed choose the programming subjects. And they were quite good at it I might add.

    As for "engineering", I do know of a few females doing Engineering. Though, some actually chose something called Enviromental Engineering.

    One thing though, most of the females I knew of who were doing the same course as I did, were of asian decent (most, but certainly not all). At the time, we had quite a lot of international students studying my course so that may be aiding that).

  • User profile image
    adnanrafik

    out of all the Japanese and Chinese students and PhDs at Leiden CompSci, I guess 95% is female.

    This is really an amazing figure.

    I'd say that about 10% of the students in the Software Engineering program here at the University of Ottawa are female, and they are quite knowledgeable.


    comparatively speaking,in China we do have a relatively larger percentage of women in the engineering,and that's one of the few blessings in a socialist economy.


    It seems that there are large number of women playing theie part in the technical field. Yes it is true that most of the discoveries are done my MALES.

    I guess there is not a single women on this Channel 9. There is no comment from them.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    ScanIAm wrote:

    We don't pay our artists, musicians, dancers, too much, we pay the MPAA and RIAA too much.



    Amen Brother

  • User profile image
    adnanrafik

    would you define MPAA and RIAA?

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