Coffeehouse Thread

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College and C#

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  • User profile image
    St23aM

    This would be great if it werent for the fact that im still a undergrad student. Thank you for the link though. Perhaps I could take a few classes even though I am undergrad. I know some schools will let undergrads take a certain number of grad level classes every semester.

  • User profile image
    cneable

    noop wrote:
    ...that certain Universities teach in C#, Java or C++ means little to me.  To me University was about learning new concepts -- and those concepts were best taught not in any specific language, but using math which is the basis for all computer science. 


    I totally agree with you here.  A couple of my jobs at Microsoft have revolved around academics - the first was while I was still a student in university in Canada, helping students and faculty in technical programs (CS, Engineering) to get as much information as possible about Microsoft technologies.  The second was helping start a similar program in Europe.

    My philosopy about this is exactly the same as yours.  While I'm pretty pro MS (though not completely unbiased...Wink), the world would _not_ be a good place if there was only Microsoft technologies in colleges and universities.  This wouldn't be a service to the students in any way.  I think you can say the same about any other technology.  I'm actually against having a course in any particular technology at a college or university.  That's just not what the programs are designed for - they're designed to teach you theory, and how to learn when you head out into the "real world".

    That said, I think it's quite valuable to give students exposure to as many different tools and platforms as possible as they do work and assignements - both ones that Microsoft produces, as well as all others on the landscape.  This gives students the ability to pick up some practical skills while loading their minds on theory, and has the side advantage of letting them evaluate all platforms for themselves - this kind of critical analysis is a key skill for college and university graduates, so what better place to practise it!

  • User profile image
    Tejaaa

    If You are living in Australia, New Zealand, Canada or USA, than you can apply for a Masters course at IT Masters, this was a Masters program which was launched by Microsoft & Charles Sturt University in Australia and is a distance based course, which means you don't have to attend regular classes anywhere.

    It offers courses in System Development, which incorporates Mircosoft's MCSD Certification and you can either do it in VB.NET or C#. As far as I know you can apply for the financial grants as well.

    Check out the sites for more details.

    Tejas.

  • User profile image
    AlfredTh

    I did a guest spot at a class at UMass Amherst the other day where C# was one of the languages they used. Stuart Reges from Arizona published a paper about using C# in CS1. See Can C# Replace Java in CS1 and CS2? People are starting to take C# very seriously. And of course you can download the C# compiler for free. It is part of the .NET Framework. But it doesn't include Visual Studio .NET which really makes things more fun. And frankly I don't understand why every CS department doesn't have MSDN AA. It doesnt cost much at all and if opens doors for students to learn a lot on their own.

  • User profile image
    Tejaaa

    Agreed, MSDNAA is so cheap and so much resourceful for the students who really want to know learn stuff. More information on it can be found from http://www.msdnaa.net/.

    Tejas.

  • User profile image
    jonathanh

    If you really want to get hard-core, there are a few universities now using the Rotor implementation of the CLR to teach classes about virtual machines, garbage collection, just-in-time compilation, etc.

  • User profile image
    St23aM

    Still cannot find either a College offering C# in my area or an online college class on C# Sad. I know there are plenty of training centers offering these classes but, I cannot get financial aid for these and well im poor because I work for a college my self. what should I do. The reason I want to take the class is that I have found that I learn best in a classroom enviroment and I want to get my MCAD certification soon. If someone would be willing to guide me to a class or some other solution I would appreciate it. Thanks agian.

  • User profile image
    tinytiger

    I just graduated from DeVry University in Chicago with a BS in CIS. I started learning C# and the .NET framework a few years ago by myself, but no classes were offered in it.

    Of course right after I graduate,

    C# has replaced C/C++ in the curriculum. Only pure object oriented languages will be taught now.

    C# and Java have replaced VB.NET. They taught VB.NET for a few semesters but have dropped it in favor of C# and Java.

    Oracle and PL/SQL classes have been dropped in favor of SQL Server and T-SQL. Oddly enough, this decision was triggered by some sort of licensing disagreement or cost escalation for academic uses of Oracle.

    There are some classes dealing with Perl, PHP, JSP, and ColdFusion, but ASP.NET is making a bigger impression on the school and classes will be offered exclusively on ASP.NET in the future.

    I would say that DeVry Chicago is almost a complete Microsoft Shop now. Many of the new changes are migrating from DeVry Corporate also and will affect all campuses around the US and Canada. DeVry is a professional/vocational school and the curriculum is partially decided by major employers and corporations.

    So, just thought some of you would like to know what kind of impression Microsoft is making out there.

  • User profile image
    St23aM

    This is very good to hear. I wonder I can take these classes online as I live in cincinnati. I will see. Do you happen to have a good link of there course offerings? 

  • User profile image
    tinytiger

    I just talked to you on AIM.. Smiley

    And I will keep an eye out for online C# courses.

    However, as a recent college grad, I am having some trouble finding a job using C#. Does anyone have any direction on starting out with this technology at entry level? I found some staff level programming positions using C# and ASP.NET out there but they're scarce and I'm starting to think your typical monster.com, hotjobs.com, computerjobs.com, dice.com, careerbuilder.com aren't the hottest places to look (not that I didn't already know that but I'm running out of ideas here).

    Hell, entry level ANYTHING is hard to come by at the moment.

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