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Lookmarks

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  • User profile image
    Charles

    Cool idea: Lookmarks

    C

  • User profile image
    sbc

    How is it different to del.icio.us?

  • User profile image
    Charles

    Much better UI... The notion of social bookmarks is interesting. In the case of Lookmarks, I like the implementation too.

  • User profile image
    Manip

    They are both poor in the UI department if you ask me.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Manip wrote:
    They are both poor in the UI department if you ask me.


    Del.icio.us wins on the standards and coding-practices front, however. But could do with a few optimisations, such as defining the links as lists rather than their own block container.

  • User profile image
    sbc

    I wonder what MSN's answer take on social bookmarks will be?

    I notice Lookmarks uses ASP.NET as well. URL's don't look as good - http://www.lookmarks.com/Default.aspx?q=css campared to http://del.icio.us/tag/css

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Of course, all of these are predated by 4rthur.com Smiley

  • User profile image
    adaml

    Here are some thoughts from the humble creator of Lookmarks...

    How is it different?

    The big picture:

    The magic (sharing and discovering links) is the same, but hopefully the implementation is more accessible to non-techies. Admittedly, in the shadow of the magic (and the critical mass that creates it), accessibility and the features below seem subtle enhancments. However, they were important enough to me that I had to build it (actually I prototyped this before knowing about del.icio.us).

    Lookmarks is intended to be more search oriented. You can search from the home page, and your searches match more than just the tags. I first envisioned it as a search engine feedback mechanism, closer to Eurekster, but still heavily weight towards community bookmarks.

    A few of the details:

    * Lookmarks can export your links to a javascript feed that will allow you to show a list of links on your blog wihthout any server side code. (That little JS button).

    * When the bookmark is to an MP3 or WMA file, it is included as an enclosure in the RSS feed. That is to say - it's a podcast!

    * Lookmarks will let you import from HTML or RSS. You can edit in bulk, and email a list to a friend.

    * Lookmarks doesn't yet have an "inbox" concept (like del.icio.us). Or currently show the latest links added (I'm going to add that soon).

    Standards and Coding Practices

    W3bbo - what do you mean here? Use of CSS and clean URLs? Just curious.

    URL Rewriting

    I'm highly covetous of del.icio.us's succint & friendly URLs. Unfortunately, I haven't found a way you can rewrite a request for what IIS considers a virtual directory. Since http://www.abc.com/whatever doesn't actually refer to an ASP.NET page, a filter doesn't intercept it. I'm pretty sure this is the case even if your 404 page is an .aspx. http://lookmarks.com/tags/css.aspx would probably be the best I could do in .NET. (As a further detail it is hosted on a shared box and other file extensions can't be configured). If any one has any tips I'd love to hear them.

    Thanks all!

    P.S. Good representation from Brits yesterday morning Smiley. Please give my regards to Moorgate station in London.

    Adam

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    adaml wrote:
    W3bbo - what do you mean here? Use of CSS and clean URLs? Just curious.


    Your site uses tables and inline styling along with depreciated presentational markup for page layout and design. This does make the pages unnescaerily large and renders them unusable to "accessible" UAs, such as Links/Lynx and Jaws. (For blind people y'see)

    ...Oh, and stops the page being future-proof and making changes harder than if you use semantic XHTML w/ external CSS2.1.

    adaml wrote:
    I'm highly covetous of del.icio.us's succint & friendly URLs. Unfortunately, I haven't found a way you can rewrite a request for what IIS considers a virtual directory. Since http://www.abc.com/whatever doesn't actually refer to an ASP.NET page, a filter doesn't intercept it. I'm pretty sure this is the case even if your 404 page is an .aspx. http://lookmarks.com/tags/css.aspx would probably be the best I could do in .NET. (As a further detail it is hosted on a shared box and other file extensions can't be configured). If any one has any tips I'd love to hear them.


    ISAPI_Rewrite()

    I've been pushing at the IIS team to include this in IIS7 but I always get fobbed off, they still haven't given me an adequate explanation as to why this feature, available by default on every single server platform out there, isn't included..[/quote]

  • User profile image
    adaml

    It's funny, late at night when you throw some formatting tags on a table cell instead of using CSS properly you think, I can't be bothered and is anybody really going to notice? Well, W3bbo did - and you're absolutely right Smiley. I've been wanting to grow my CSS skills so propper formatting is a natural habit.

    Thanks for the ISAPI_Rewrite() reference. It may just come in handy.

    - Adam

  • User profile image
    sbc

    Perhaps these will be of use as well:

    Rewrite.NET - A URL Rewriting Engine for .NET
    URL Rewriting with ASP.NET

    Pity with IIS it is not as flexible as IIS with URL rewriting (you have to point to the ASP.NET ISAPI filter to work with directories and other file extensions). You cannot get /2005/05/08/ to point to /show.aspx?date=20050505 on a shared host.

  • User profile image
    dotnetjunkie

    sbc wrote:
    You cannot get /2005/05/08/ to point to /show.aspx?date=20050505 on a shared host.


    I know and that's such a shame!!!

    IIS7 team, do you hear us?  We really want URL rewriting that works without having to process EVERYTHING through the ASP.NET filter...

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    dotnetjunkie wrote:
    We really want URL rewriting that works without having to process EVERYTHING through the ASP.NET filter...


    Actually, we want full Content Negociation. URI Rewriting is just a part of the concept.

    Regardless, Trident/IE doesn't stick to Content Neg. rules well, so it would be a moot point for a Microsoft team to develop. (Ergo: "If IE doesn't support it, and IE is made by the same company, why should we? (For fear of being lynched by the IE team)")

    Although the IIS and ASP.NET2.0 products are an example of when Microsoft sticks to specs and gets it right.

  • User profile image
    Maurits

    If you write a "custom 404 page" you can get the effect of transparent directory redirection.  Admittedly this is rather ugly.

  • User profile image
    sbc

    Maurits wrote:
    If you write a "custom 404 page" you can get the effect of transparent directory redirection.  Admittedly this is rather ugly.

    That tends to work OK. Although it is harder when the 404 page is 404.html or 404.asp (either redirect to an ASPX page or code in JScript/VBScript).

  • User profile image
    jsrfc58

    Charles wrote:
    Much better UI... The notion of social bookmarks is interesting. In the case of Lookmarks, I like the implementation too.


    Interesting idea.  The only issue I would have with this is a minor navigation idea. When you click on a user, say "adam" you are brought to a search result page with the heading:

    "Results 1 - 10 of 1009 for user:adam"

    Then, I noticed the list of links on the left ("related tags"), but the only thing is, once you click on one of them (say, "blog", then click on another one like "innovation") the only way to get back to the original 1,009 links/results page is to go back, back, back. Maybe add another link (above related tags) to bring the user back to the main search results?

    Just rambling,
    jsrfc58

  • User profile image
    adaml

    Interesting idea jsrfc58. Since navigating throught the tags is omnidirectional, breadcrumb style navigation doesn't feel quite right. But something like "back to blog" then back to "user:adam" would be good. I've also thought of building out a tree on the left hand side, but I think that would be too bulky.

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