Coffeehouse Thread

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Visual Studio is just way too expensive!

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  • User profile image
    jamie

    ...it needs to be said that ALL Microsoft software is over priced..

    300 for xp? should be 49$
    600 for office? should be 99$
    Visual basic helps devs write to MS platform - it should be FREE
    And the pricing on servers is nutty - considering Linux is free

    ( * i dont use linux - but am considering it for webserver)

  • User profile image
    Charles

    Stay tuned, fellas, stay tuned. Wink

    Charles

  • User profile image
    prog_dotnet

    U can get a free copy of Visual Basic .NET 2003 Standard Edition by rating 5 short films

    Free Not-For-Resale Copy of Visual Basic .NET 2003 Standard Edition*

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    Grab your popcorn and soda, sit back and enjoy

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  • User profile image
    lars

    How about that! Free (as in beer) education and software. I'm impressed!

    But you forgot the footnote:

    "This offer is valid in the 50 United States, the District of Columbia, all U.S. military bases that contain valid APO/FPO addresses, and Canada."

    (* Self censored tasteless joke about Canada and its close relationship with the US *)

    /Lars.

  • User profile image
    sbc

    North America only though.

  • User profile image
    Sampy

    Much wisdom this Charles has...

  • User profile image
    Spar

    Ah... shame there are no developers in Europe who wuld be interested in this then. Wink

  • User profile image
    mkizer

    When I first got interested in .NET I couldn't get my company to pop for VS2002, so I just went out and got the Visual C# Learning Edition for around $70. Not only do you get a fairly complete edition of Visual Studio (plus the C# compiler), but you get a good book too -- Visual C# .NET Step By Step (by Sharp & Jagger).

    Now they've picked up the tab for VS2003 (although the project I worked on was VB.NET, I'm still learning C# in my spare time -- just picked up Chris Sells' book on WinForms in C#).

  • User profile image
    codeRonin

    jamie wrote:
    ...it needs to be said that ALL Microsoft software is over priced..

    300 for xp? should be 49$
    600 for office? should be 99$
    Visual basic helps devs write to MS platform - it should be FREE
    And the pricing on servers is nutty - considering Linux is free



    I couldn't have said it better myself.


    jamie wrote:
    ( * i dont use linux - but am considering it for webserver)


    Consider it seriously. I think you like what you see. [url=http://channel9.msdn.com/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=1371#1371]Look at my previous post here.[/url] [url=http://channel9.msdn.com/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=1375#1375]And here[/url]


    Charles wrote:
    Stay tuned, fellas, stay tuned. Wink


    Well, Charles, since 1994 I've been programming with Microsoft products, starting with Access 2.0 and moving up the chain to VB 6.0 currently. I have to say I'm a hardcore programmer meaning I do much more then what you tutorial can tell me. That's about 10+ years and honestly I'm getting tired and fed-up with [i]Staying tuned[i/]

  • User profile image
    Charles

    codeRonin,

    By stay-tuned I am referring to the fact that issues like these are really being addressed inside the company. My reply is in no way an attempt to deflect these concerns with the usual corporate marketing mumbo jumbo. Sorry I can't be more specific, but I can't.
     

    Charles

  • User profile image
    lars

    Somewhat off-topic: Is there a "family licence" for Office? Say you have two adults that have their own computer and the kids share one to do their homework. Throw in a laptop. Suddenly this is very expensive. Even though to total time the applications are used are way less than what one person would do full time at work. What is the best solution for such a family?

    /Lars.

  • User profile image
    themaffeo

    codeRonin wrote:
    Well, Charles, since 1994 I've been programming with Microsoft products, starting with Access 2.0 and moving up the chain to VB 6.0 currently. I have to say I'm a hardcore programmer meaning I do much more then what you tutorial can tell me. That's about 10+ years and honestly I'm getting tired and fed-up with [i]Staying tuned[i/]


    Regarding 'Staying Tuned'.

    I've been developing applications with microsoft tools (Notpad counts!) targeting microsoft platforms for virtually my entire career.  One thing I have learned is that we are constantly in a state of 'Staying tuned.'  This is a constant for any programmer - we are constantly waiting for the next iteration of software/language/platform.  Anyone remember 'staying tuned' for J2EE to come out?  Better yet, ever asked your boss to 'Stay Tuned' (albiet, not in those words) for your latest fix?

    Being told to 'Stay Tuned' is only a problem when nothing is ever delivered.  The very fact that microsoft releases a new office product with new functionality approx every 1.5 years, or the fact that visual studio had an immense upgrade only a year after it was launched goes to show that they DO deliver.

    If its one thing microsoft does not produce often it's vapor ware.

    If MSFT tells me 'x' tool 'is coming' so 'stay tuned', I'll take that to the bank. 

    Another thing:

    I've always been a strong proponent of MSFT 'slowing down' a bit when they need to - something they have been doing lately (Think XP SP2 and Longhorn).  There is nothing wrong with taking some extra time to ensure a release of something is secure and bug free.  Now, if it's 2012 and we're still waiting for longhorn - then I'll join in and say that I'm tired of hearing 'Stay Tuned'.  But as long as MSFT continues to deliver to me SDK's, Dev enviornments, office suites, and server products at such a blinding rate I can barely keep track of the names, I say we cut them a little slack when they tell us 'Stay Tuned'



  • User profile image
    themaffeo

    lars wrote:
    Somewhat off-topic: Is there a "family licence" for Office? Say you have two adults that have their own computer and the kids share one to do their homework.... What is the best solution for such a family?

    /Lars.


    First, I'm not a lawer and I don't claim to fully understand the EULA.

    A clooge: Set up terminal services (remote desktop as we are calling it now) on a machine with Office and connect to it remotly like that. (I think thats legal)

    A cheaper solution: I though the Office licence allowed you to install it on up to two machines you own. (Takes care of you and your wife) and then get an educational licence for your kids (i'm assuming they are in school)

    Another Idea: Ebay is always fun for software.

    Another Idea: if you are an ISV you can get 10 copies of office 2003 plus more from the action back for under 300.

    Another idea: let the kids use (gasp!) open office or somehting similar - if they only use word, oo should be ok.

  • User profile image
    Jeremy W

    You'll need copies of the Office Terminal Services License (I believe) in order to do that. They're fairly inexpensive though, much less than the full version.

  • User profile image
    lars

    I was thinking about a hypothetical end user family without any special technical skills. I think terminal services is too hard. They probably don't know about open source alternatives.

    Microsoft Office 2003 Standard is about $400
    Looks like that covers one computer and one laptop.

    The Student and Teacher edition is about $120. That covers three installs. For a student or a parent of a student. So that covers the kids computer and one parent. I think.

    Standard $400 - one + his/her laptop.
    S & T:   $120 - Kids computer + one parent.

    It's a jungle! Thank God (or Bill?) for MSDN subscriptions!

    /Lars.





  • User profile image
    eagle

    Join Microsoft Empower for ISVs

    It's a great program, you get all the tools you need and resources to guide you along.

    I highly recommended it!

  • User profile image
    ZippyV

    Indeed, but you have to become an isv and ship a product within 12 months (or not?).

  • User profile image
    eagle

    Yes, but creating software appellations that other people will find useful and hopefully pay you for your efforts is what Visual Studio.Net was designed to do.


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