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Gartner attacks Microsoft over Longhorn

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  • User profile image
    Shining Arcanine

    http://www.neowin.net/comments.php?id=20485&category=main

    Personally, I think that this is absurd, they state the obvious and then blame the company that is going to create the next killer app that they say that the market needs. Do they expect Microsoft to some how magically have what will be out in 2006 out this year or something?

    By the way, from my understanding the delays with Longhorn and Windows XP SP2 is that first devs were moved over to XP SP2 which caused Longhorn delays, then some were moved back to Longhorn which caused XP SP2 delays. ^_^;;

    A Microsoft Representative said that to a relative that works for a company that deals with Microsoft.

    Anyway, if you guys are having problems with dev allocation, why not just go on a hiring spree and double your work force by hiring 10,000 more developers? Have the existing developers take 2 months off to train them (after that have them take the security course) and you will have in theory, doubled the rate at which products are developed.

  • User profile image
    lars

    "Adding resources to a late project makes it later".
    -- Frederick P. Brooks, Jr.

  • User profile image
    Jeremy W

    Yes and no. I say that mainly because I was going to say "throwing more resources at something doesn't mean it'll get done any sooner".

    Throwing enough well managed resources at a project often does mean it gets done sooner. But just "hiring 10,000 new developers" doesn't sound like it'd fit under that roof.

    To put this in perspective for some people, the last estimate I'd heard is that so far Longhorn has taken 1200 man years to produce.

    The team isn't a small one, and it's not just the core OS. There's a lot that goes into a new OS like Longhorn, and XP for that matter, which is more than just the code.

    And, now that the dates have been set in the roadmap, partners are changing their plans accordingly. Suddenly saying "whoops, Longhorn'll be out in 2005" would (now) be worse than releasing it late because the market wouldn't be ready for it.

  • User profile image
    Shining Arcanine

    Jeremy W. wrote:
    Yes and no. I say that mainly because I was going to say "throwing more resources at something doesn't mean it'll get done any sooner".

    Throwing enough well managed resources at a project often does mean it gets done sooner. But just "hiring 10,000 new developers" doesn't sound like it'd fit under that roof.

    To put this in perspective for some people, the last estimate I'd heard is that so far Longhorn has taken 1200 man years to produce.

    The team isn't a small one, and it's not just the core OS. There's a lot that goes into a new OS like Longhorn, and XP for that matter, which is more than just the code.

    And, now that the dates have been set in the roadmap, partners are changing their plans accordingly. Suddenly saying "whoops, Longhorn'll be out in 2005" would (now) be worse than releasing it late because the market wouldn't be ready for it.


    My suggestion was in order to accelerate everything that is being developed now and in the future.

    By the way, I never said that they should have poor management.

  • User profile image
    Jeremy W

    Shining Arcanine wrote:

    My suggestion was in order to accelerate everything that is being developed now and in the future.

    By the way, I never said that they should have poor management.


    I'm not debating that. Problem is that finding and hiring 10,000 people could easily take a year (or two). Then training them, getting them integrated and getting them to the point where they're producing decent code could easily be another few months.

    On top of that you'll need to hire well over a thousand lead dev's, testers, program and product managers... And they'll require even more rampup time.

    On a project like this I just don't see it saving that much time.

    Even if you do, though, manage to get it out sooner:

    1. Is it actually worth the cost (10,000 employees times the MS average of 70K/year is a pretty big pay bump... Can Longhorn afford it)?
    2. What do you do with these 10,000 devs afterwards?

    I'm not saying the intention is wrong, just that it's really, really, really easy to mismanage an undertaking like this. From experience. Smiley

  • User profile image
    Gambit

    Well if they wanted to hire just one programmer I'd be more than happy to head up to 'The campus' Smiley

  • User profile image
    Shining Arcanine

    Jeremy W. wrote:
    Shining Arcanine wrote:
    My suggestion was in order to accelerate everything that is being developed now and in the future.

    By the way, I never said that they should have poor management.


    I'm not debating that. Problem is that finding and hiring 10,000 people could easily take a year (or two). Then training them, getting them integrated and getting them to the point where they're producing decent code could easily be another few months.

    On top of that you'll need to hire well over a thousand lead dev's, testers, program and product managers... And they'll require even more rampup time.

    On a project like this I just don't see it saving that much time.

    Even if you do, though, manage to get it out sooner:

    1. Is it actually worth the cost (10,000 employees times the MS average of 70K/year is a pretty big pay bump... Can Longhorn afford it)?
    2. What do you do with these 10,000 devs afterwards?

    I'm not saying the intention is wrong, just that it's really, really, really easy to mismanage an undertaking like this. From experience. Smiley


    1. As long as you have products to develop and products to sell, more devs are always good.

    2. They can work on other projects like next generation Windows and Office. Maybe some could be added to the IE Team to speed up development of IE's standards support. Wink Some could speed up the development of service packs and others could search for security holes. There is quite a bit that they could do.

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