Coffeehouse Thread

33 posts

VS.Net 2005 is not XHTML compliant "by design"

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Well part of it, the HTML controls

    Now there's a complete cop out.

  • User profile image
    Pimp Daddy

    Well, there's a workaround, but the problem shouldn't have been there in the first place.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Pimp Daddy wrote:
    Well, there's a workaround, but the problem shouldn't have been there in the first place.


    The workaround (and the bug) is mine.

    But having harped on about XHTML compliance to limit it to asp.net controls and not fix the underlying HTML control editing is pathetic to say the least.

  • User profile image
    irascian

    blowdart wrote:

    Now there's a complete cop out.


    Yup. A very disappointing response.

    If that's "working as designed" the design was quite clearly crap. And how difficult can it be to change a rendered bit of text from upper case to lower case?!

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    irascian wrote:


    Yup. A very disappointing response.

    If that's "working as designed" the design was quite clearly crap. And how difficult can it be to change a rendered bit of text from upper case to lower case?!


    Indeed. Which makes me wonder how bad the rendering of other HTML controls are if you drag and drop them from the toolbar.

    Go shout about it in the bug feedback Smiley

  • User profile image
    Wells

    Can you re-open the bug?  Heck, why not file another one and insist they fix it.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Wells wrote:
    Can you re-open the bug?  Heck, why not file another one and insist they fix it.


    Would be a bit obvious if I did it Big Smile

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Wells wrote:
    Can you re-open the bug?  Heck, why not file another one and insist they fix it.


    OK reopened with a tirade.

    Hey scoble, the VS team are breaking a major promise here.


  • User profile image
    bitmask

    I'm not convinced this is breaking a major promise.

    HTML Controls exist primarily to transition from ASP to ASP.NET. There is no good reason to use them in a new .NET web project. If you want to use raw controls and muck around with Form values you can always write XHTML using ASP instead of ASP.NET.

  • User profile image
    realgeek

    I've worked on quite a few ASPX projects. We've never used the pre-packaged HTML controls. They were not very useful. Nobody should be using them.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    realgeek wrote:
    I've worked on quite a few ASPX projects. We've never used the pre-packaged HTML controls. They were not very useful. Nobody should be using them.


    Not useful? Hmm, consider, for example, submitting data to pages on other sites. PayPal is the obvious example. You can't use asp controls because that wants postback to your web site.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    bitmask wrote:
    I'm not convinced this is breaking a major promise.

    HTML Controls exist primarily to transition from ASP to ASP.NET. There is no good reason to use them in a new .NET web project. If you want to use raw controls and muck around with Form values you can always write XHTML using ASP instead of ASP.NET.


    Erm.. well I've been using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls for months now, and I prefer them over UI.WebControls because they're less abstract and, as far as I'm concerned, give me more control.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    bitmask wrote:
    I'm not convinced this is breaking a major promise.


    http://www.asp.net/whidbey/whitepapers/VSWhidbeyOverview.aspx?tabindex=0&tabid=1

    Second paragraph

    The environment includes a best-of-breed HTML source editor, an improved visual page designer, a new project system, better support for working with data, and full XHTML standards support.

    Full. Not just on asp.net controls. Full.

    And the built in validator doesn't even pick it up as an invalid value.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    W3bbo wrote:


    Erm.. well I've been using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls for months now, and I prefer them over UI.WebControls because they're less abstract and, as far as I'm concerned, give me more control.


    Especially when things like asp:label weren't actually labels, but divs.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    Wait. Are we talking about the System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlInputRadioControl, or about the Visual Studio designer? Because as far as I can tell, the HtmlInputRadioControl will output proper lowercase property values for checked.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Sven Groot wrote:
    Wait. Are we talking about the System.Web.UI.HtmlControls.HtmlInputRadioControl, or about the Visual Studio designer? Because as far as I can tell, the HtmlInputRadioControl will output proper lowercase property values for checked.


    Designer.

    Manually enter an html radio button group. Don't make any selected. Switch to design view. Make one checked via the property group. Oops.

    I only bugged it because I thought it would be a simple fix, but the response shocked me to say the least.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    bitmask wrote:

    Moving forward with HtmlControls, you’ll miss out on features like skinning in ASP.NET 2.0, too. 



    Which is a good thing.

    Don't you love how all the skinning examples out there don't use CSS. Nice to see embedded styles making a come back.

  • User profile image
    bitmask

    W3bbo wrote:

    Erm.. well I've been using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls for months now, and I prefer them over UI.WebControls because they're less abstract and, as far as I'm concerned, give me more control.


    It all depends on what you are trying to build, I guess, but being close to the metal isn't necessarily a good thing.

    With the HtmlControls you have hard coded markup.

    WebControls, on the other hand, can use adaptive rendering and spit out different markup for older browsers and mobile devices. I'd say this is more of a gain in flexibility than a loss of control.

    Moving forward with HtmlControls, you’ll also miss out on features like skinning in ASP.NET 2.0.

Comments closed

Comments have been closed since this content was published more than 30 days ago, but if you'd like to continue the conversation, please create a new thread in our Forums, or Contact Us and let us know.