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An attack on human rights in Egypt, where's your tubes now?

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  • User profile image
    Chadk

    http://blogs.wsj.com/tech-europe/2011/01/28/how-egypt-cut-itself-off-from-the-net/

    With major carriers such as Vodaphone colluding with the Egypt government to deny most access to the internet in Egypt, I'd really be afraid what'd stop this from happening just about anywhere else.

    Surely with so many countries having ruled that internet is a human right, this shouldn't be possible in our civilized country.

    As somebody who uses Vodaphone service(Which is crap), I'm really tempted to switch ISP. Because blocking a whole country like that is just inexcusable Sad

  • User profile image
    dahat

    You are missing a key factor in Egypt... they are sort of in a state of emergency right now, so it’s not unusual for any government to suspend certain rights for the duration of the emergency.

  • User profile image
    Chadk

    How is cutting away internet access going to help anything?

    If anything, it will send all the geeks, pirates, nerds and all those people, who wouldn't normally go to the streets, actually go out and protest.

    Local businesses also gotta be suffering from it. All this for what? You can't contain information anyway, so the rationale for doing things like this, as seen to many times in the past, is invalid and does more damage than good.

  • User profile image
    dahat

    I didn't say it was going to help anything... I was just stating that it’s being cut is not unexpected.

    The Egyptian government is facing protects which draw from 4GW (possibly even 5GW) tactics and is trying to limit their effectiveness.

    More likely this move was not done to prevent information from getting out, but to slow it down to a more manageable level.

  • User profile image
    GoddersUK

    According to the BBC they're cutting off the net by switching off the DNSs (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-12306041); in which case the answer to the question in the title ("where're your tubes now?") is 208.67.222.222.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    , dahat wrote

    You are missing a key factor in Egypt... they are sort of in a state of emergency right now, so it’s not unusual for any government to suspend certain rights for the duration of the emergency.

    The country has effectively always been in a "state of emergency" ever since the late-1960s which is how a constitutional republic and a democracy can get away with trampling on the masses.

    Incidentally, the president of Egypt just dismissed his cabinet, but plans to stay in power. It's a compromise, but is it enough to quell the masses?

    (And I'll say I'm impressed with the progress these popular uprisings have had, I was expecting a repeat of the unsuccesful actions in Iran last year, where the government holds on to the policy/army/paramilitary and so doesn't go anywhere).

  • User profile image
    dahat

    , W3bbo wrote

    *snip*

    The country has effectively always been in a "state of emergency" ever since the late-1960s which is how a constitutional republic and a democracy can get away with trampling on the masses.

    Irrelevant, the threat to the state has radically changed in recent days.

    , W3bbo wrote

    (And I'll say I'm impressed with the progress these popular uprisings have had, I was expecting a repeat of the unsuccesful actions in Iran last year, where the government holds on to the policy/army/paramilitary and so doesn't go anywhere).

    Different kinds of 'uprisings' lead to different kinds of results against different kinds of governments. It’s very difficult to compare those in Egypt and Iran and their most recent 'uprising'.

  • User profile image
    dahat

    @GoddersUK: the BGPmon blog is suggesting that it has to do more with BGP rules in the routers.

  • User profile image
    GoddersUK

    @dahat:

    Ahh... sorry, I ought to know better than to trust the BBC on technical matters...

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