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Another forecast of RT's demise

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  • User profile image
    elmer

    http://www.techworld.com.au/article/457879/prices_windows_rt_tablets_drop_point_failure_os/

    There is a lot of smoke being blown about here (and I suspect some of it up certain orifices) but it does suggest that there might be at least a few sparks to watch out for, if not yet actual fire.

  • User profile image
    DeathBy​VisualStudio

    @elmer: The Pros got cuts too. That would seem to indicate the first round of W8 devices (RT & Pro) were flops and/or that a new wave is on its way.

    I think Windows RT's still has legs if only because it seems Microsoft believes that WinRT is the replacement for Windows desktop apps as we know it today. With almost no vision from Microsoft on the future of the Windows desktop it really leads to only one conclusion: its there for backwards compatibility and that's it.

    With the desktop out of the way Windows RT still seems to hold some legitimacy. If they could get OfficeRT out the door tomorrow (with Outlook) Windows RT might be worth a second look for some -- just not me. Slap a digitizer on a Windows RT tablet (for OneNote) and you have created a pretty compelling device for most students. Especially if you price them for $400 or less.

    One other point; If WinRT replaces WinPRT on WP8 then you effectively have much of Windows RT running on WP8. I don't see phones giving up ARM for Intel any time soon.

    If we all believed in unicorns and fairies the world would be a better place.
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    Proton2
  • User profile image
    JoshRoss

    The thing that baffles me is that RT was released in the first place. I suppose someone at Microsoft thought that if you make a great development environment with awesome tooling, that you would somehow get awesome apps. And if you had those great apps on your platform, then the short comings of Windows could be forgiven.

    I guess that didn't happen. Face-palms for everyone!

    If you look at how screwed up the mobile transition went from Windows Mobile to 8 via Windows Phone 7, you can't help but to think that the tablet strategy has any hope at success. If at first you don't succeed, try screwing your customers and do a strategy reboot. And, when that doesn't work,  try screwing your customers and do a strategy reboot.

    But, who knows? This is coming from a guy who think Android is a pile of crap-- me. And look at how many of those devices are floating around out there. But the genius of the thing is that Microsoft makes more money from Android than Google does. This isn't a good thing for anyone, its a resource curse.

    The best part of Windows was a serious commitment to backwards compatibility, followed closely by universality. Window RT was not only was released prematurely before any proof of concept killer app was developed, but just its existence damaged the brand name of Window along with its value proposition.

    What a mess. Three years ago, I was totally thrilled with the PC side of Microsoft. Everything was going in the direction of awesome. How does a company take so much good will and just spin it into hay. Its like reading Rumpelstiltskin in reverse. Good greif!

    -Josh

  • User profile image
    PopeDai

    During the Surface launch period late last year the whole campus was decked-out with banners imploring us to "Click in!" - they've all gone now: replaced with pictures of housewives in the kitchen chopping cucumbers, explaining how Outlook.com helps you stay organized.

    I saw a fair few people on campus using Surface RT devices (about the same number that I've seen using iPads), but they've been dwindling lately - my friends and coworkers who also received their technically-not-yours Surfaces report that they keep them around the home for couch web-surfing or watching Netflix at the dinner table - but overall, I'm seeing less and less of them.

    I still prefer my iPad to the Surface - it's lighter, doesn't have sharp-edges, and has a more readable aspect ratio (surfing the web full-screen on a 16:9 device does not work, in either portrait or landscape), and the Surface touch keyboards we were issued become an irritant more than a charm - and I can't justify spending $150 on the type keyboard cover for a device I don't technically own.

    Is the Surface RT doomed? After seeing the initial enthusiasm die down - yes, I think it probably  is. I see the prevailing mindset in our non-technical customers is "Oh, it runs Windows - so I can run my Steam games and Photoshop on it, right?" - and unfortunately Windows RT still hasn't won over developer-share - looking past the couple of pages of ported games (hello? original content?) in the Windows App store you quickly see the gigabytes of crap apps people see fit to even put a price-tag on. We have a long way to go to make Windows RT a strong value proposition - if we ever can.

     

  • User profile image
    Bas

    @PopeDai: was it ever supposed to be for the long term, though? They needed Windows to run on ARM, because they needed to have something on tablets and x86 didn't cut it for tablets. Now that there are Atoms capable of delivering ARM-like speeds and power consumption, running on ARM is no longer vital, and RT is no longer necessary. They knew this day would come, but perhaps it came just a bit sooner than they expected?

  • User profile image
    Jim Young

    , PopeDai wrote

    I still prefer my iPad to the Surface - it's lighter, doesn't have sharp-edges, and has a more readable aspect ratio (surfing the web full-screen on a 16:9 device does not work, in either portrait or landscape), and the Surface touch keyboards we were issued become an irritant more than a charm - and I can't justify spending $150 on the type keyboard cover for a device I don't technically own.

    Funny, my opinion is the exact opposite. My iPad has been doing nothing but gathering dust since buying my Surface RT. As far as weight goes, strap a keyboard on an iPad and let me know which one is heavier 😉

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    I use my Vivo RT daily and the only complaint I have is that the docking keyboard seems to flake out pretty regularly. 

    It's a toy, but I knew it was a toy, so I didn't expect it to act otherwise.

    Everyone I work with that took their iPads to meetings for the few weeks after first purchase have stopped doing so because:  A tablet is not a viable business platform.

    Just cuz it looks cool in the movies doesn't make it cool in reality.

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    @elmer: Prices drop on some devices by a whopping $50 and it must indicate a flop? I'm not arguing that RT is selling like gang busters, because it doesn't seem to be. But the logic there is just so flawed that I hesitate to call it logic.

    Far more likely, the prices are dropping (and like DBV says, not just for RT devices but Pro devices as well) because OEMs are making room for the new line of devices we expect to hit the streets in June. It's pretty normal for OEMs to reduce inventory 3-4 months out from new product launches, and we've got less time than that now. Frankly, RT may die quickly not because it's selling bad (which it is) but because the next line of Pro products will out perform the RT devices in both performance and battery life while running full Windows.

    It's still too early to call the ecosystem a failure, though. OEMs aren't backing out of the Windows 8/RT game just yet.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    Surface RT has only just launched in Japan, and they're advertising it big in every single electronics store I've been in. Where before finding the lone Windows 8/RT tablet amidst all the android tablets was extremely hard, now you actually have a hard time finding the Android tablets around all the big signs advertising Surface and Windows 8/RT (iPads are usually still in their own section of the store though, so unlike Android they're not mixed with and obscured by the Windows tablets).

    A couple of fellow students at my lab said they wanted to buy a Surface RT. Both also have iPads.

  • User profile image
    PopeDai

    , Bas wrote

    @PopeDai: was it ever supposed to be for the long term, though? They needed Windows to run on ARM, because they needed to have something on tablets and x86 didn't cut it for tablets. Now that there are Atoms capable of delivering ARM-like speeds and power consumption, running on ARM is no longer vital, and RT is no longer necessary. They knew this day would come, but perhaps it came just a bit sooner than they expected?

    Not working on Windows, I don't know, I can only speculate. And speculation is only going to get me into trouble Smiley

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    Deactivated User

    Comment removed at user's request.

  • User profile image
    kettch

    @jinx101: I'll trade you. I've had a Samsung Slate for almost a year now, and I'm ready to trade it for an RT device. There isn't a single x86 application that I find is necessary to have while mobile. Basically the only x86 app installed on it is Office.

  • User profile image
    dahat

    , PopeDai wrote

    I saw a fair few people on campus using Surface RT devices (about the same number that I've seen using iPads), but they've been dwindling lately - my friends and coworkers who also received their technically-not-yours Surfaces report that they keep them around the home for couch web-surfing or watching Netflix at the dinner table - but overall, I'm seeing less and less of them.

    I must be one of the odd ones then (wait, we knew that)... as I find my Surface RT far nicer to carry to a meeting to take notes on (or keep up with email on). If I suspect the meeting only requires my awareness but not my full attention... then my full laptop comes along for actual dev work.

    It gets couch duty as well when at home, but it has become in invaluable companion in general to me since October.

  • User profile image
    elmer

    Perhaps the much rumored Outlook on WinRT might help.

    http://winsupersite.com/windows-rt/what-s-happening-outlook-rt

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    Deactivated User

    Comment removed at user's request.

  • User profile image
    kettch

    No, I wouldn't trade an iPad. We have them at work, and they are usually used level monitors and such.

  • User profile image
    PopeDai

    , jinx101 wrote

    *snip*

    I've got an iPad, probably wouldn't trade. Smiley  It has the apps I want for personal casual use.  For work though, I need a Windows Desktop (or laptop) and I pretty much just live on the desktop.  When I really want to do something, the desktop always has the software I need. 

    Even as a programmer, there are things I write as hobby projects that I simply couldn't write for a tablet because the API's are so restricted as to what you're allowed to do and access (in the name of security of course).  So much is made of the death of the desktop and as of now I simply don't see it at least in my case. 

    I like iOS, from a user-experience and developer's perspective, except for the lack of a user filesystem. I understand the design decision against it, but having some shared "My Documents" folder that every application can use, or the ability to easily extract files from installed applications without using iTunes would turn the iPad from being great to being insanely-great. The current "Open in" system in iOS doesn't work well from a user's perspective as it isn't clear if the file will be copied to the destination application, or if the destination is opening the file directly.

    I feel Windows RT is on the right track with support as a USB host and providing a filesystem, but everything else needs improvement - and the lack of a TIFKAM file manager doesn't help either.

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