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Apple maps potentially life threatening

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  • vesuvius

    This is a wake up call for Apple, and them sacking the guy at the top makes sense.

    Learning to read a map and using that tried and tested method makes me despair of the seemingly basic skills that "apps" on smartphones are robbing a generation of. My nephew can read a digital clock but not an analogue one (will be corrected), in some grammar schools kids are now not allowed smartphones, but I fear for swathes of the population, parents will be competing to show that all their kids have iPhone 5's

  • Ray7

    <sigh/>

    I've said it before and I'll say it again: In the wrong hands, every GPS is potentially life-threatening.

    And without the right preparation and adequate provisions, relying on them can be fatal.

    P.S.

    Maps was the least of the reasons Forstall was sacked. Remember that Browett went at the same time for much the same reasons. And I would be very surprised if Cook didn't know the state of Maps when it was released.

     

     

  • MasterPi

    +1 Blaming it on a device when you couldn't have just used the paper map is stupid.

    Re: digital clocks...in high school, I was astonished when I learned that most students in my class couldn't read an analog clock. What's worse...they still can't.

    I do feel like i grew up at the right time, though....so far, a little more than half of my life saw the emergence of the PC and the transition from over-the-air broadcast to cable. I remember too well what it was like when the digital world was switched on for a mere hour here and there.  

  • evildictait​or

    I bet when paper maps were first invented there were people saying "These new fangled paper maps are making children stupid. Why, for sooth, children will in future be entirely unable to navigate by the stars!"

  • vesuvius

    @Ray7:Speechless after that list, clearly people are headed for Brave New World, and forgetting what they are capable of.

  • evildictait​or

    , vesuvius wrote

    @Ray7:Speechless after that list, clearly people are headed for Brave New World, and forgetting what they are capable of.

    People have been mortally stupid since long before GPSes were invented:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darwin_Awards

  • vesuvius

    @evildictaitor: The quest then must be to be able to navigate by the stars, and navigate paper maps equally well

  • vesuvius

    , MasterPie wrote

    I was astonished when I learned that most students in my class couldn't read an analog clock. What's worse...they still can't.

     

    Astonishing, simply astonishing. An aunt in her gracious and dignified age, cannot send text messages, and does not use a computer, which I appreciate came along a little too late for her to substitute Poirot books for Google, but a clock, they're all around you. Fancy seeing Big Ben and not being able to read it, that just does not compute.

  • DeathBy​VisualStudio

    And they no longer teach cursive handwriting in public schools either (at least in my neck of the woods). I think technology is a great enabler but it can equally be a disability when we shovel more and more responsibility on to our technology. Inevitably:

    1. We'll eventually forget how to fix the very things we've created
    2. We'll loose the appreciate what technology is doing for us in the first place.
    3. We'll relinquish personal responsibility and blame technology for important things like answering for why you ran a child over with your car -- "because my device's navigation told me to go that way."

    Technology is a tool -- not a replacement for our humanity -- and always should be treated as such.

  • evildictait​or

    , vesuvius wrote

    Fancy seeing Big Ben and not being able to read it, that just does not compute.

    Why would you look at Big Ben to know the time when your iphone in your pocket tells you what the time is without the need to look up or travel to parliament square? And instead of roman numerals on a round face that makes you have to sort of guess the minutes by looking at the angle, your iPhone will tell you exactly what time it is in digital quality immediately.

    I don't like this whole "we need to teach our students how to do the stuff that we could do" nostalgia BS. If we make something that means our kids don't have to jump through the same stupid hoops we did to get the information that they need, why should we teach them to do stuff in the old fashioned way?

    Frankly GPSes fill a major gap that maps have - i.e. it tells you where you are, without you needing to know before hand. Digital times might be less pretty than analogue ones, but they're by-and-large more accurate and faster to interpret, and if a student fails to put his apostrophes after possessives or dares to ends his sentences with a preposition, I think it is a world that we will have to put up with.

    And you know what - it might be better.

  • wastingtime​withforums

    , DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

    And they no longer teach cursive handwriting in public schools either.

    Seriously? You mean, they don't know how to write joined characters?! How do they write in school.. with block capitals? How do they get anything done this way? It's f* time consuming.

  • Dr Herbie

    There was an interesting discussion on Dara's Science Club (for BBC viewers) talking about how modern technology might affect the development of the human brain. But it has happened before! When the printing press was invented, we no longer had to memorise so much information and there was a marked change in the way people's brains developed.  This is happening again with computers and the internet, but it's not the end of civilisation as we know it.

    Herbie

  • Dr Herbie

    @wastingtimewithforums: Actually both my children are learning cursive handwriting in school at the moment.  I've told them they're not learning to touch-type until their handwriting is up to scratch (my son is left-handed so he's having to work harder at neatness).

    Herbie

  • evildictait​or

    "The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for
    authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place
    of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their
    households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They
    contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties
    at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.

    - Socrates

    The following regarding things have been neglected:
    "I mean such things as these: ? when the young are to be silent before their elders; how they are to show respect to them by standing and making them sit; what honour is due to parents; what garments or shoes are to be worn; the mode of dressing the hair; deportment and manners in general. You would agree with me? ? Yes."

    - Plato

    "The world is passing through troublous times. The young people of
    today think of nothing but themselves. They have no reverence for
    parents or old age. They are impatient of all restraint. They talk as
    if they knew everything, and what passes for wisdom with us is
    foolishness with them. As for the girls, they are forward, immodest
    and unladylike in speech, behavior and dress."

    - Peter the Hermit (1274 AD).

  • ScanIAm

    , wastingtime​withforums wrote

    *snip*

    Seriously? You mean, they don't know how to write joined characters?! How do they write in school.. with block capitals? How do they get anything done this way? It's f* time consuming.

    Why do you write anything? I type way faster than I could ever write, and no matter how well you train someone in the art of cursive, most people's handwriting looks like crap.

    So, yeah, I do write in all caps so that people can read what I write, but mostly I type.

    And, now, for a thought experiment: If you were stranded on an island and wanted to be rescued, would you arrange your coconuts, sea-shells, and seabird carcasses in cursive?  Would you use upper or lower or mixed case?

     

  • wastingtime​withforums

    , ScanIAm wrote

    *snip*

    Why do you write anything? I type way faster than I could ever write

    Because typing on a electronic device is not always possible, nor desirable. Let's say you're reading a book and want to take notes, or you're learning and you write the stuff down to remember it better. Or you need to write down an adress fast.. a pen is always faster than a multimedia device! It's also not distracting.

    About the schools... they surely can't be typing on a computer all the time? The time factor to write block characters is astronomical compared to cursive, - any time saved by not learning cursive is eaten up tenfold by writing always block characters.

  • vesuvius

    , evildictait​or wrote

     - Socrates

     - Plato

     - Peter the Hermit (1274 AD).

    I knew all of those as I read them, not word for word, but close nevertheless (disconcerting). I find inspiration in Art and looking back, even in programming. Once you get over the hurdle of learning something new, it is the people with historical knowledge that seem to do better, not always, but in general.

  • ScanIAm

    , wastingtime​withforums wrote

    *snip*

    Because typing on a electronic device is not always possible, nor desirable. Let's say you're reading a book and want to take notes, or you're learning and write the stuff down to remember it better. Or you need to write down an adress fast.. a pen is always faster than a multimedia device! It's also not distracting.

    A pen is only faster than a multimedia device if you happen to have:

    1) a pen

    2) something to write on

    3) no working media device to use.

     

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