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Apple maps potentially life threatening

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  • User profile image
    wastingtime​withforums

    These quotes don't tackle the problem of today - total reliance on something so fickle like modern technology. The elderly have always thought that the young are brats, that's one thing, but never in human history has man given up his innate abilites so willingly to rely completely on something so unreliabe and prone to failures - yet so complex - like bits and bytes. A human can't fly or reach the speed of a racing car. You have no choice but use a machine. But a person can very well write just with fingers if needed. Losing that ability only to literally rely on a complex machine for the task is madness.

    Using a machine to enhance your abilities is great! Using a machine to disable your abilities is terrible!

    Let's not forget that it isn't even single machines we are talking about nowadays, but always-mothership-connected prolonged arms of organizations that most of the time don't have your well being in mind.

    Herbie: "When the printing press was invented, we no longer had to memorise so much information"

    A book exists and is usable without a power plant. Books and scrolls that are thousands of years old are getting found, and are still readable, while the average USB stick rots within less than a decade. Think what immense infrastructure is needed to keep a single net-connected PC working.

  • User profile image
    elmer

    @vesuvius:I say it's simply natural selection at work.

    Honestly, in all the times I've driven through Mildura, I've never once required a map.

  • User profile image
    MasterPi

    Why bother learning anything "old"? History? Who needs that? It's all about social media and what twitter tells me I should care about. Mashups for LOB apps man.

    Seriously, are we debating whether kids should know where they are, how they got there, and how to get back? So, they should just simply walk around in 3D (technically, 4D) space without using any sort of spacial reasoning?

    For clocks...thankfully, people can still distinguish night from day without needing their smartphone.

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    When you all get done sliding down that slippery slope into hysteria, recognize that the ability to write in cursive is a skill that could completely disappear from human knowledge and our ability to communicate wouldn't be diminished.

    Nobody suggests that we should unlearn language or letters, just that we relegate cursive handwriting to the same bin we've done with calligraphy.

    If you want to write pretty, go to art school, nancy.

  • User profile image
    wastingtime​withforums

    , ScanIAm wrote

    When you all get done sliding down that slippery slope into hysteria, recognize that the ability to write in cursive is a skill that could completely disappear from human knowledge and our ability to communicate wouldn't be diminished.

    Nobody suggests that we should unlearn language or letters, just that we relegate cursive handwriting to the same bin we've done with calligraphy.

    My point is though that cursive is far more effective than other kinds of hand-writing. It's far faster than writing block letters or calligraphy. We are "binning" the more efficient method.

  • User profile image
    exoteric

    As lovely and useful as high-tech is, there's something deeply satisfying about simple things, things that are built to last, things that do not require power sources and things that can be built without sophisticated machines. /eom

  • User profile image
    MasterPi

    @exoteric:+1

    Analog clocks offer some benefits over digital clocks.They visually demonstrate the relative weight of time lapses as a fraction of the remaining time (you don't quite feel this with a digital clock, you just know it via computation).  You can also tell instantly in which quarter of the hour it is and whether it's past noon, evening, midnight without worrying about the actual time. Heck, you don't even need numbers on a clock...just the hour and minute hands are enough to give you reasonable approximations that are just as useful.

    Oh, and they're soooo cool looking (canvas required).

  • User profile image
    Bass

    @vesuvius:

    Ever heard the expression "beating the dead horse"?

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , wastingtime​withforums wrote

    *snip*

    My point is though that cursive is far more effective than other kinds of hand-writing. It's far faster than writing block letters or calligraphy. We are "binning" the more efficient method.

    But far less effective than other kinds of communication, such as typing.

    Being able to write in cursive was important in the early 20th century because handwriting was the primary form by which humans conducted official correspondence.

    In the 21st century, it is much more sensible for us to teach our students to get a 10% speedup in their typing than to get a 10% speedup in their handwriting, because when those students are older they are going to spend vastly more time wasted waiting for their fat fingers to spit their little thoughts out onto a computer than pushing their words out via the nib of a pen onto paper.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    , Dr Herbie wrote

    @wastingtimewithforums: Actually both my children are learning cursive handwriting in school at the moment.  I've told them they're not learning to touch-type until their handwriting is up to scratch (my son is left-handed so he's having to work harder at neatness).

    Good thing you weren't my father, then, because I would still not be allowed to touch type. Wink

    Honestly, my handwriting is terrible, and has always been terrible. Back when I was in elementary school it was a common joke for my teachers to say I would become a general practitioner because my handwriting was so terrible.

    I also never, ever use cursive anymore. I'm way faster writing in block letters (although I can write cursive quite fast, I can't read it back myself unless I go really slowly and carefully). The only thing that I still use that's sort of cursive writing is my signature.

    Note being able to read an analogue clock though, that's just stupid. Let's just hope those people never need to catch a train when their iPhone's battery has run out (90% of stations I've been to only have analogue clocks).

  • User profile image
    BitFlipper

    , Bass wrote

    @vesuvius:

    Ever heard the expression "beating the dead horse"?

    Well this is a new development so it's hardly beating a dead horse.

  • User profile image
    elmer

    , Sven Groot wrote

    Back when I was in elementary school it was a common joke for my teachers to say I would become a general practitioner because my handwriting was so terrible.

    You just weren't taught properly... nothing like a few hard whacks across the back of the knuckles with a metal-edged ruler, to sort out your handwriting.

    When I were lad... LOL... teachers tried to force lefties to write right-handed, because they smudged the ink.

  • User profile image
    Proton2

    Here is a guy that didn't have GPS and was lost in the woods for 3 weeks.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/story/2012/12/08/mb-missing-man.html

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    , elmer wrote

    *snip*

    You just weren't taught properly... nothing like a few hard whacks across the back of the knuckles with a metal-edged ruler, to sort out your handwriting.

    When I were lad... LOL... teachers tried to force lefties to write right-handed, because they smudged the ink.

    They had me go back to teaching books for 12 year olds when I was 16. I had to sit in the head masters office for 3 hours a week practising. My writing still sucks.

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    accuracy over speed, I would NOT use cursive for its speed when most people trying to cheat their way out of bad spelling using wiggly fonts. Even if it is correctly spelled, most people's writing are terrible and cursive makes it even worse. Communication is all about accuracy, not speed.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    GoddersUK

    @MasterPie: It takes me about 30 seconds to read an analogue clock Blushing

    But I take pride in being able to use a (proper) map and compass; training from my days in the Scouts showing through, I think.

    Plus, I like my AZ it doesn't need an expensive data contract, it works on the tube, it never runs out of battery, no-one's going to mug me for it, it doesn't matter if I lose/damage it...

    EDIT:

    Before people are allowed sat navs that tell them where to go they should prove their competency with one of these:

    Generic Forum Image

  • User profile image
    TLapworth93

    I am 19, i can read analogue clocks, digital and binary. I can use a real map and compass and a GPS. Its not the whole of my generation that is this.....for lack of a better phrase....uneducated. Its simply a select few. Although i wont argue that the generations after me are mostly degenerates :3

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    , elmer wrote

    @vesuvius:I say it's simply natural selection at work.

    Ouch!

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