Coffeehouse Thread

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At cross road.

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  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    So, I am wondering if I am too restrictive to my career? I am mainly MS guys, most things are MS related. But, it seems like I am too weak? I find a lot of jobs are Linux related and I didn't like Linux to heart. Do you think the MS community is getting smaller and smaller that, focusing on MS related field are no longer enough?

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
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  • User profile image
    figuerres

    well i have had some thoughts along this line also... some of the ms calls in the last few years have not been as good as i would like.

    Linux:  hey just stay clear of the fanatic fringe and learn what you can, one thing i loved about working with it was that it gives a good look at the how and why of UNIX and how to build things in the "UNIX" way.

    also i would still strongly reommend that folks use a few linux boxes in a larger network for things like VPN, firewall, web proxy, front end in bound mail servers etc...   you can build some very good defences from the  internet using a few low cost linux boxes to creat part of the network.

    also i find that when you learn more about Linux / UNIX you learn more about how things like TCP/IP and routing and such really work at a lower level and with more understanding.

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    I suppose it is time for an upgrade. I am getting less trendy. Thanks for the input.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
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  • User profile image
    DeathBy​VisualStudio

    MS surely isn't the only party in town now with iOS and Android being so prevelant. You don't need to dump your MS desktop to develop for the Android stack. I've been working full-time on a an Android project for a couple of months now and Eclipse, Java, and Android are great to program with. I'd say Eclipse might even be a little better than Visual Studio (and faster!). If your a web programmer then I'd understand the leaning towards linux with the popularity of the LAMP stack. No matter which way you cut it MS's dominance in application development is soon to be over. They'll kill it with Windows 8 and HTML5/JS.

    In any case do what makes you happy; don't let MS define you. Best of luck to ya.

    If we all believed in unicorns and fairies the world would be a better place.
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  • User profile image
    Bas

    Wow,people are just itching to declare .NET dead lately,huh?

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    I don't think itching is the word. Why would one want to throw away years of investment only to have to start over? It is my experience that makes me valuable. Developers seem to be able to commit to Apple and Objective C, or Java and those platforms continue to be updated with none of  this puerile marketing from the Windows Division. We have all watched windows from DOS to Windows 7, and new features in an OS are always about the same. the main reason for the change in windows is arriving 2 years too late.

    Microsoft could have continued investing in windows forms, but went for WPF, now they are ditching that as well. If WPF and Silverlight require me to move back to C++ that will mark the beginning of the end of my association with Microsoft.

    Microsoft look like they think people with continue to use WPF and Silverlight, while they finish off their new HTML 5 and JavaScript platform over several iterations in the next few years, if this is the case then Microsoft are in deep sh*t!

  • User profile image
    Dr Herbie

    If you're a professional developer and the job market in your area changes, then you have to change with it.  If you really don't want to change your skillset, then you're going to have to move to an area where your skills match the market.

    On the other hand, I agree with vesuvius; everyone's rushing to declare the end when we don't actually know yet.  As damaging as uncertainty is, I don't expect to have to change skills in the next few years.

    Herbie

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    ,Bas wrote

    Wow,people are just itching to declare .NET dead lately,huh?

    no, just saying that it's not the only game in town.

  • User profile image
    Bas

    ,vesuvius wrote

    I don't think itching is the word. Why would one want to throw away years of investment only to have to start over?

    Who knows? It's just that this is the nth thread on this subject and each time one is posted, the usual suspects come out of the woodwork to vehemently agree with it and point to some piece of perceived evidence while nodding furiously.

  • User profile image
    harlock123

    Personally I found that I am afflicted with wanderlust, I am always searching for something new to learn. While Silverlight, C# and WCF Web services are my current bread and butter, I am branching out out currently to IOS and ANDROID development, (ObjectC and JAVA respectively).

    Hell I am even playing around with LUA in the form of a framework that targets both IOS and ANDROID in Anscamobil's Corona SDK for gaming stuff...

    Having done COBOL, Assembler, Basic, C, C++, Pascal, Forth in the past, as I look back from here all I see are technologies that I embraced whole heartedly at one time, only to move on as new stuff appeared before me....

     

     

     

  • User profile image
    spivonious

    It's always good to keep up on the latest tech. If I had a Mac, I'd probably be playing with objective C for the iOS. I did a ton of Java in college. I'd even feel okay programming in Lisp.

    As far as the future of .NET, I also think that it may be time to start shaking the rust off of your C++ skills. MS is really pushing native programming again, and with the rumors of "ActiveX 2.0" it makes sense. Does that mean all .NET apps will suddenly be rewritten? Of course not. There are tons of VB6 apps out there and it hasn't been updated since 2004 (SP6).

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    Let's ignore the FUD surrounding Win 8 (I'm using FUD in it's pure meaning here). It is ALWAYS a good idea to broaden your knowledge. The Pragmatic Programmer (http://www.amazon.com/Pragmatic-Programmer-Journeyman-Master/dp/020161622X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1313072614&sr=8-1) suggests you constantly learn a new programming language even if you won't actually use that language in your job, as it makes you better in your chosen language. The same thing can be said of platforms and tools. Further, no technology lasts forever, and you won't want to find yourself in the same situation as many Cobol programmers did in the 90s, with a limited skill set no longer in demand in the job market. I don't believe the .NET skill set is losing demand in the market place now, nor do I believe it will do so in the near future (in fact, the demand may go up), but I'd still say it's a very good idea for you to learn LINUX development.

  • User profile image
    DeathBy​VisualStudio

    ,Bas wrote

    *snip*

    Who knows? It's just that this is the nth thread on this subject and each time one is posted, the usual suspects come out of the woodwork to vehemently agree with it and point to some piece of perceived evidence while nodding furiously.

    And likewise the same ostriches, buried head deep, come out and dismiss the obvious. I guess that explains how there are people who will blindly follow the likes of Sarah Palin.

    Microsoft's big mistake with pushing native code and moving to HTML5/JS is that they assume people will just go along like they have no other choice. Times have changed and IMO they'll be in a big surprise if they try and get developers to dawn the equivalent of throwback jerseys.

    If we all believed in unicorns and fairies the world would be a better place.
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  • User profile image
    Bas

    I guess that explains how there are people who will blindly follow the likes of Sarah Palin.

     

    Oh good, for a moment there I thought people would start running out of arguments and start spouting random nonsense.

  • User profile image
    magicalclick

    @Dr Herbie:

    The problem is not me itching. It is the employer's desires. And it comes to my attention that most of startup or research related field uses linux because it is free. Several big company uses linux too, like Amazon and Hulu. I cannot put a blind eye to it. I wouldn't start doing linux right away, but, it is on my to-do list now.

    BTW, it has nothing to do with WPF vs HTML5. Some people kinda linked to it. But, I am just looking at pure core os perspective. Paid OS and free OS and career trend.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
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  • User profile image
    wkempf

    ,DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

    *snip*

    And likewise the same ostriches, buried head deep, come out and dismiss the obvious. I guess that explains how there are people who will blindly follow the likes of Sarah Palin.

    Microsoft's big mistake with pushing native code and moving to HTML5/JS is that they assume people will just go along like they have no other choice. Times have changed and IMO they'll be in a big surprise if they try and get developers to dawn the equivalent of throwback jerseys.

    Yep. Our heads are buried. We've not looked at all of the available evidence and come to a conclusion, we're just "hoping it goes our way".

    Clue 1: some of us will be fine no matter which way it goes.

    Clue 2: some of us have looked at all of the evidence, and not just one or two quotes out of context.

    From my perspective, you're the one who's seeing what you want to see here. There is NO evidence that .NET is losing any traction at all, much less is being killed by Windows 8. Quite the contrary, new versions of Silverlight, WPF and even the C# language are known to be in the works, all of which says far more than the tea leaves being used to predict the death of .NET.

  • User profile image
    exoteric

    I can't wait for September 9th. There's going to be a lot of "I told you so's" going around. Smiley

    PS - don't invest your brain cycles in products - invest them in ideas.

  • User profile image
    MasterPi

    ,wkempf wrote

    There is NO evidence that .NET is losing any traction at all, much less is being killed by Windows 8. Quite the contrary, new versions of Silverlight, WPF and even the C# language are known to be in the works, all of which says far more than the tea leaves being used to predict the death of .NET.

    The company I'm interning at seems to be investing MORE into Silverlight solutions on the IT side. There doesn't seem to be any doubts here...

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