Coffeehouse Thread

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//BUILD/ 2013

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  • User profile image
    ESgarbi

    I just hope we don't get the same drama during the registration last year where 80% of the people out there kept on complaining about limited number for the conference.

  • User profile image
    Bas

    @ESgarbi: of course we won't. I mean, it's not like many, many devs have massive entitlement issues.

  • User profile image
    ESgarbi

    , Bas wrote

    @ESgarbi: of course we won't. I mean, it's not like many, many devs have massive entitlement issues.

     

    @Bas LOL! Honestly, there was so much fire at the blog-sphere last year when they sold out that I even felt bad for getting tickets to Build2012.

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    It's not just the size...but that they combined PDC, MIX and I believe TechDays(?) into one conference, and the first mega-conference they have is in a circus tent in a baseball field during the rainy season. And the next one is in San Fran and only has a capacity of 2,000.

    It's just confusing...

  • User profile image
    TexasToast

    Yeah I find it odd too.   First it is fairly early, and second Balmer said it was going to be in LA at the Staples center.    I like Microsoft's campus but it really sucked to have Build there.  One nice day and the rest were all rain.  I also did not like getting on the bus all the time and I like having the hotel near the conference center (which makes San Fran a bit better).   

  • User profile image
    Bas

    Just wow.

  • User profile image
    MarkDeFalco

    There's definitely a balance.  Having too many conferences makes it confusing for attendees to know which one to go to, or forces them to pick one out of many that may apply to them.

    It also takes time out of our engineers' schedules every time they need to create sessions, demos, practice, travel, etc.  So there's a tradeoff between being able to get things done, being able to get as many experts to the events so you have access to them, and making it easy to make a decision on where to go in the first place.

    Also TechDays is definitely still around: http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/TechDays/

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    @MarkDeFalco - Well you have to look at it from the companies point of view. If you have a MIX conference, who do you send? You send 2 or so front-end devs. Then you have a PDC, who do you send? A team lead, a senior dev, maybe even the senior front-end person.

    BUILD 2013 is $2,000 for only 2 days of sessions...who do you send? And again, this conference is so small it will sell out in 3 days without the sessions even being partially known.

    Too many people are being left out, and too many companies aren't able to send people if they can't see what the conference is about. And companies also lose out, because if I remember right, conferences like these can go towards a Gold partnership.

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , Harlequin wrote

    @MarkDeFalco - Well you have to look at it from the companies point of view. If you have a MIX conference, who do you send? You send 2 or so front-end devs. Then you have a PDC, who do you send? A team lead, a senior dev, maybe even the senior front-end person.

    BUILD 2013 is $2,000 for only 2 days of sessions...who do you send? And again, this conference is so small it will sell out in 3 days without the sessions even being partially known.

    Too many people are being left out, and too many companies aren't able to send people if they can't see what the conference is about. And companies also lose out, because if I remember right, conferences like these can go towards a Gold partnership.

    I think perhaps more importantly, these conferences are a way of Microsoft getting developers "on side" and selling Microsoft's view of the world to the delegates.

    To give you a good example - look at how much bad press Windows8 got about things like the Metro screen. Now Microsoft had good reasons for lots of that, and if they explain it to you, some of it makes sense. But they didn't explain it. And so everyone assumed it was stupid. And part of that was because they didn't hold a big event and sell their message.

    Windows8 has a big message for developers. WinRT is completely different to Win32. Metro-land can't use Win32. Async and await are completely new concepts. Capabilities are new. The app-store is new. You have to be full-screen. You have to be touch-aware. You probably have to support ARM.

    Microsoft has some important messages in Windows8 - and lots of them are really good, and there's lots of developer demand for it (like async/await for example).

    And it is utterly failing to communicate those messages to developers.

    Sure, some of that is down to the media enjoying a good Microsoft-kicking party. But more of it is down to the fact that Microsoft utterly fails to push its messages by inviting developers to hear their side of the story by replacing high capacity technical conferences with lots of talks with what amounts to short gatherings of a small number of developers where "getting your message across" has long since been replaced with "try and bribe the delegates with shiny bits of kit".

    //build/, MIX, TechFest etc are Microsoft's way of staying relevant to developers, and they're currently screwing it up.

    It won't be long after Microsoft stops being relevant to developers that it'll stop being relevant to users. And it won't be long after that before it stops being relevant full stop.

  • User profile image
    TexasToast

    Does not look like it is selling out this year .  (at least not as fast as last year)  Looks like Google gets more interest for some reason.

  • User profile image
    OrigamiCar

    @TexasToast:Google gets a lot of people going just for the freebies they give away - including a lot of hipster, non developers these days. Fortunately Build doesn't seem to suffer from that anywhere near as much (yet) - hopefully it never will.

    For me at least the conference and sessions are the reason for going - the giveaways are nice, but not the reason I go..

  • User profile image
    ESgarbi

    @TexasToast:Just got an email from a friend and he said that its was sold out in 2 hours.

  • User profile image
    Richard.Hein

    , Harlequin wrote

    ...

    And companies also lose out, because if I remember right, conferences like these can go towards a Gold partnership.

    I don't think that's true anymore, and it only applied to the Worldwide Partner Conference.

  • User profile image
    Richard.Hein

    @evildictaitor:  What are you talking about man, they had all kinds of events for Windows 8 where they demoed everything and then the Surface launch and Build and all the events after it are full of sessions with videos you can watch online that cover all that material.  What kind of event do you want?  How big are you talking? 

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , Richard.Hein wrote

    What kind of event do you want?  How big are you talking? 

    Well, let's put it this way. Google's I/O conference this year is 5500 delegates and is a full Tuesday -> Friday worth of conference.

    The blackhat conference in Vegas is for 7500 delegates and backs onto the DefCon conference, taking the total up to a full week.

    The Apple conference (WWDC) usually holds ~4400 delegates.

    But in general, my approach is simple. If you're selling our your conference in less than a day, you need your conference to be bigger. That's what selling out means. It means that more people want to come and join in the conversation, and having a conference that is too short and too oversubscribed means that people who you should be talking to aren't being talked to.

    Microsoft might make it's money from selling to users and not developers, but the reason users want Windows is because Microsoft is a required platform to run the apps they want. If developers move their apps off the Microsoft platform, users that were core Microsoft customers will follow their apps right off the edge of the Microsoft platform and onto their competitors' platforms.

    Microsoft ignores developers at their peril. Because the future of Microsoft is determined not by the cleverness of the folks in Redmond, but by the exclusivity of their platform amongst apps that users want.

  • User profile image
    TexasToast

    @ESgarbi: Ok looks like it sold out now!  So I guess there still is interest.  Need to plan a trip to wine country for the weekend following.

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    , evildictait​or wrote

    *snip*

    If you're selling our your conference in less than a day, you need your conference to be bigger. That's what selling out means. It means that more people want to come and join in the conversation, and having a conference that is too short and too oversubscribed means that people who you should be talking to aren't being talked to.

    ++

  • User profile image
    Richard.Hein

    @evildictaitor: Ok, so you want a huge # of people, but that does not equal quality of content, and considering that all the sessions are now online, they are able to reach orders of magnitude more people with the information they require.  If it wasn't for the rain at //build/2012 it would have been perfect, IMO. 

    In any case, I haven't seen any official numbers for this years conference posted anywhere.  Does anyone know how many tickets are being sold this time?

     

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