Coffeehouse Thread

66 posts

Forum Read Only

This forum has been made read only by the site admins. No new threads or comments can be added.

//BUILD/ 2013

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    DeathBy​VisualStudio

    @evildictaitor: I wholeheartedly agree with both your posts. From Build 2011 to-date IMO they use silence and deflection as their principle communication strategies. They can justify all they want about how other vendors do the same but it doesn't move them to the top of my stack because of it.

    Microsoft is a big company so I can understand that sometimes they'll have vague, varying, sometimes contradictory views coming out of the company. IMO, where it falls apart is when the guy at the top sets the tone of "Developers! Developers! Developers!" and they fail to communicate a complete roadmap for developers going forward at such events as Build they make it more difficult for developers to make Microsoft their choice. It seems like the "developer message" is "we'll broaden the base by including more commonly known HTML and javascript in the stack so we have more developers we can burn through".

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    @Richard.Hein: I think the venue says it can handle 2,000.

  • User profile image
    davewill

    @Harlequin: They could have used Timewarner Cable Arena. The bobcats could use some time off.

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

    IMO, where it falls apart is when the guy at the top sets the tone of "Developers! Developers! Developers!" and they fail to communicate a complete roadmap for developers going forward at such events as Build they make it more difficult for developers to make Microsoft their choice.

    I think perhaps a lot of people at Microsoft forget that 99.999999% of users turn on their laptop in order to get to the app that they want to use.

    The job of the OS is not to be shiny. It is not to be clever. It is not to come with a whole ton of preinstalled apps. It is not (!) even to be secure, or power efficient or fast or nice.

    The job of the OS is to get the hell out of the way of the user, who is trying to use their app. Everything else is gravy.

    And I think this is what Microsoft forget all too often. Windows does not make money from being a great OS. It makes money by being a great platform.

    The success of a platform is not defined by the people that build the platform. It's defined by the people that build apps that users want on the platform.

    So when Microsoft forgets to include third-party developers right at the very heart of their Windows strategy, they are forgetting the only party in the Windows ecosystem that actually determines whether or not Windows lives or dies.

    If Windows8 fails - it is not because the OS itself is bad. It is because it has failed to attract the third-party developers to make the killer-apps exclusively for Windows8 that the platform needs.

    Or to put it another way, for a downpayment of a small number of millions of dollars to keep the developer community right at the heart of Windows' strategy, they could have made large numbers of millions of dollars by getting developers excited to develop killer apps for Windows8 that would have got users excited to buy Windows8.

  • User profile image
    exoteric

    I don't have that much sympathy for pricey developer conferences. These are events selling a platform to support an ecosystem and drive sales that Microsoft stands to earn big on, from several angles).

    However since the majority of interested developers can't attend anyway, the virtual user experience is important - and indeed it has been top-notch for the last couple of years. So I can't really complain. In fact, following Channel 9, I feel more informed than many of my peers.

    One thing I do miss is a public technology roadmap. Where are you heading next and what should I avoid or how should I prepare for upcoming changes, if I want to be ahead of the curve?

    Windows 8 nailed the tablet UX but what are the plans for the desktop?

    The big picture going forward, insofar as it is settled and probable.

  • User profile image
    exoteric

    , evildictait​or wrote

    *snip*

    I think perhaps a lot of people at Microsoft forget that 99.999999% of users turn on their laptop in order to get to the app that they want to use.

    The job of the OS is not to be shiny. It is not to be clever. It is not to come with a whole ton of preinstalled apps. It is not (!) even to be secure, or power efficient or fast or nice.

    The job of the OS is to get the hell out of the way of the user, who is trying to use their app. Everything else is gravy.

    And I think this is what Microsoft forget all too often. Windows does not make money from being a great OS. It makes money by being a great platform.

    The success of a platform is not defined by the people that build the platform. It's defined by the people that build apps that users want on the platform.

    So when Microsoft forgets to include third-party developers right at the very heart of their Windows strategy, they are forgetting the only party in the Windows ecosystem that actually determines whether or not Windows lives or dies.

    If Windows8 fails - it is not because the OS itself is bad. It is because it has failed to attract the third-party developers to make the killer-apps exclusively for Windows8 that the platform needs.

    Or to put it another way, for a downpayment of a small number of millions of dollars to keep the developer community right at the heart of Windows' strategy, they could have made large numbers of millions of dollars by getting developers excited to develop killer apps for Windows8 that would have got users excited to buy Windows8.

    That's perhaps a little simplistic; after all, what is a great platform anyway? Certainly a lot of factors play a role. The UI, the battery life, boot time, performance, latency, security, etc. If the platform has issues, so too will the applications.

    The end user often attributes flaws in third party drivers to the operating system itself, "there Windows goes again, crashing" - but is it far fetched to believe that a consistently positive UX across multiple design aspects will lead end users to implicitly attribute this to the platform itself? And certainly developers can pick that up. Another thing developers can pick up is language- and platform-assisted support for things like asynchrony. Something which doesn't have a good story on other platforms.

    Also, chicken and egg...

    Now about the UX. The very purpose of the Microsoft Design Language (MDL) is to get out of the users way, or so it seems. It's about the (almost) chromeless UX which is superbly well-suited for touch-enabled devices, possibly with limited screen real-estate.

    Many ordinary people first and foremost do appear to judge operating systems on their surface - how the user experience is, the chrome - all the rest is black magic - and why shouldn't it be. But that does stress the extraordinary importance of the UI/UX and how that plays a key role in the success of a product. It also means that big UX changes are very risky, of course.

    To be honest, when looking at apps, I also judge them by their design - and many apps appear to use not only the MDL but simplistic templates which give them a very similar look. Maybe that's me not spending enough time with Windows 8 apps though but my first impresssions were of RSS reader-like applications with a cookie-cutter design. I think that kind of "everything looks the same" experience can be detrimental to a platform.

  • User profile image
    TexasToast

    @ESgarbi:Looks like there are still spots.   I guess it is not sold out.   The sold out story was premature. 

  • User profile image
    Bas

    @TexasToast: perhaps they have a variety of plans depending on the amount of sold tickets. Could be they sold out on the small venue and moved on to the bigger venue, opening up more tickets.

  • User profile image
    TexasToast

    @Bas: That is what it looks like.   I think they wanted more participation (see all the complaints in this thread) so they probably watched the numbers and then went into a second tier planned venue with more space at the Moscone center.   They had quite a huge selections of hotels for only 2000 attendees so maybe the hotels were already in place for a bigger venue.    I am sure some Microsoft folks might have some inside information.   I was at PDC in 96 at San Fran and it was good (Active X we have come a long way).   It is a nice place to bring a guest and spend a few extra days.  I like the logistics at Staples Center in LA but it gets boring to go there all the time.  Looking forward to San Fran again.  (plus I got early bird this time)

  • User profile image
    MasterPi

    @TexasToast: If you look at the events list, they're not even mentioned even though a lot of companies are listed past that date. Nothing between 6/26 and 6/28, which may indicate that they're not committed to anything yet and could be shifting things accordingly as you suspect.

  • User profile image
    TexasToast

    @MasterPie:Are you suggesting they don't even do the conference at Moscone?   That would suck because I picked a hotel based on being able to walk there and back.   It would be nice if Microsoft would give a little more information on what they're thinking is.   I also wonder why it is so early in the year.   I think they have even skipped years now they have one conference within 9 months of the last one.

  • User profile image
    MasterPi

    @TexasToast: No. I meant shifting things within Moscone to allow for more than 2000 attendees.

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    The other side of things, is that paying three grand for what is essentially time for 8 or so sessions, that's almost $400 per session...sounds a big high to me. Yes, those conference box lunches are good, but...

  • User profile image
    TexasToast

    Looks like the timing is right to give away the new Xbox at Build 2013. I think since they gave away windows phone and 2 different tablets before this would make sense. http://news.cnet.com/8301-10805_3-57578387-75/microsoft-may-announce-next-generation-of-xbox-on-may-21/

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    , TexasToast wrote

    Looks like the timing is right to give away the new Xbox at Build 2013. I think since they gave away windows phone and 2 different tablets before this would make sense. http://news.cnet.com/8301-10805_3-57578387-75/microsoft-may-announce-next-generation-of-xbox-on-may-21/

    if this is true or close to true: "Thurrott added even more to mull over. He said "Durango" is likely to be expensive -- $500 for the console itself and $300 for the annual Xbox Live subscription."

    then I bet many folks will not buy it.

    right now a year of gold / xbl is about 60 USD depending on how and where you buy it.

    if they try to raise the price of the xbl sub they better have some really killer reason for getting folks to buy that... if the next xbox requires me to pay $300 and buy the console then I will not buy it.

    I bet that would be the reaction of *MOST* gamers / xbox owners.

    I hope that number was supposed to be more like 30.00  not 300.00 

  • User profile image
    MasterPi

    , TexasToast wrote

    Looks like the timing is right to give away the new Xbox at Build 2013. I think since they gave away windows phone and 2 different tablets before this would make sense. http://news.cnet.com/8301-10805_3-57578387-75/microsoft-may-announce-next-generation-of-xbox-on-may-21/

    But the intent with giving away the tablets and the phones in previous conferences was to familiarize devs with the new platforms. They were gifts, but ones that would benefit MS as well. I'm not sure an Xbox makes a lot of sense, unless MS is doing something significant to bring Xbox dev in line with Win8 and WP. Though, I do agree that a windows phone is unlikely. A Surface Pro is possible, but then they wouldn't be promoting Windows RT and they already gave away the Surface RT last year.

    My money is on something else they'll release between now and Build, probably in the Surface family. Maybe Surface Lenses.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    , MasterPie wrote

    @TexasToast: No. I meant shifting things within Moscone to allow for more than 2000 attendees.

    You know places like this are limited by fire regulations, rather than where the chairs are, right?

  • User profile image
    TexasToast

    , blowdart wrote

    *snip*

    You know places like this are limited by fire regulations, rather than where the chairs are, right?

    I meant that they could rent out parts of it and then add exhibit halls or conferences rooms later if they wanted to expand the conference.   Yes there is a max number but it is not 2000 .  I think they have room for 8000 if you get the entire place.   So working at Microsoft  maybe you can give some answers on why San Fran and why 9 months within the last build conference.. 

Conversation locked

This conversation has been locked by the site admins. No new comments can be made.