Coffeehouse Thread

20 posts

Broken VPN support in Windows 8 (RTM)?

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • ManipUni

    So has Microsoft broken UDP Encapsulation in Windows 8? 

    This workaround that thousands of people have had to use since Windows XP now no longer appears to be working at all: 

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/926179

    It just gets ignored as if it wasn't set. I cannot tell if they have just moved it (again) as there is no support article on it (yet?).   

    If they have broken it for real then their business users are going to be calling up a LOT.  

  • ManipUni

    Actually scratch that. After wasting tons of my time I found out it was in fact the power button in Windows 8 which is "broken."   

    Going charm bar->Settings->Power->Shut Down does not in fact cause Windows to shut down (in the true sense). Instead it is actually hibernating so when you would Shut Down and Power back on, you weren't seeing settings applied.   

    In order to apply changes/settings you have to actually use the Restart option. 

    PS - I'll add this to my list of why Windows 8 is a terrible operating system.   

     

  • ManipUni

    Seems to be caused by this:

    What is fast startup?

    Fast startup is a setting that helps your PC start up faster after shutdown. Windows does this by saving system info to a file upon shutdown. When you start your PC again, Windows uses that system info to resume your PC instead of restarting it.


    How wonderful intuitive. They've renamed hibernation and hidden it so we think they have made boot from cold faster... 

    Instead they've just broken Shut Down so it doesn't do what it says it does on the tin. If I wanted to hibernate I would click the option that says, you know, hibernate.   

     

  • Sven Groot

    But it's not a full hibernate. You do in fact log out and all your applications are terminated. It's only the kernel which hibernates. And it makes booting Windows 8 incredibly fast on this system.

    And now you know that and it'll never be a problem for you again.

  • ManipUni

    @Sven Groot: I still maintain it isn't communicated well to the end user. 

  • GoddersUK

    +1. They should call it "fast shut down" or something and have a separate option for "full shut down" (although why you'd need full shut down, other than to restart, I'm not sure)

    EDIT: The problem is that in most people's mind shut down and restart are basically synonymous - except that restart also starts it up again. For us, we can be told it's different and it's fine - but what about "average Joe" who can't figure out why his updates aren't applying? (on a related note I still find that the majority of people don't realise that hibernate is a 0 power consumption mode, but think it's more like standby)

  • evildictait​or

    , GoddersUK wrote

    +1. They should call it "fast shut down" or something and have a separate option for "full shut down" (although why you'd need full shut down, other than to restart, I'm not sure)

    EDIT: The problem is that in most people's mind shut down and restart are basically synonymous - except that restart also starts it up again. For us, we can be told it's different and it's fine - but what about "average Joe" who can't figure out why his updates aren't applying? (on a related note I still find that the majority of people don't realise that hibernate is a 0 power consumption mode, but think it's more like standby)

    "Full shutdown" is achieved by doing precisely that in Windows8. If you want a proper reset, choose "restart".

    "Shutdown" to most users means "turn the power off" rather than reset the internal state of the machine.

    "Restart" means reset the internal state of the machine, and so it performs a full shutdown and reset.

  • GoddersUK

    , evildictait​or wrote

    *snip*

    "Full shutdown" is achieved by doing precisely that in Windows8. If you want a proper reset, choose "restart".

    "Shutdown" to most users means "turn the power off" rather than reset the internal state of the machine.

    "Restart" means reset the internal state of the machine, and so it performs a full shutdown and reset.

    I think you're crediting the average user with too much understanding. If the terms were completely new then there wouldn't be a problem. But everyone "knows" that shutdown and restart do the same thing, except that restart turns it back on again. Microsoft have to break that association, somehow, and the only way I can see to do that is to rename the options.

  • DeathBy​VisualStudio

    Poor grandma...

    If we all believed in unicorns and fairies the world would be a better place.
    Last modified
  • Sven Groot

    How likely is your grandma to want to edit the registry for something like this?

    My grandparents never even touched a computer...

  • DCMonkey

    , evildictait​or wrote

    *snip*

    "Full shutdown" is achieved by doing precisely that in Windows8. If you want a proper reset, choose "restart".

    "Shutdown" to most users means "turn the power off" rather than reset the internal state of the machine.

    "Restart" means reset the internal state of the machine, and so it performs a full shutdown and reset.

    Maybe they should call it "Reset" then. As long as no one confuses it with "Refresh".

    "Shutdown" has done the same thing for 17 years. You expect people to notice the subtle nuances now? Maybe they should add a tutorial video,.

  • DaveWill2

    I wonder what types of things will happen when customers "shutdown", then change out or replace hardware, and then power up?

  • AndyC

    @DaveWill2: It just works.

    For the most part plug-and-play doesn't actually need the kernel to go through a full restart process just because of a hardware change, it has been capable of hot-swapping for a long time now. In cases where a full restart is actually necessary (changes to obscure registry entries aside), it will detect that and go through a normal cold start instead.

  • DaveWill2

    @AndyC: sweet.

  • cheong

    I'm wondering what difference would my application see if my application register to watch power event. Will my application see suspend message in fast shutdown?

    And will power management event support enters the requirement for Win8 logo certification?

    Recent Achievement unlocked: Code Avenger Tier 4/6: You see dead program. A lot!
    Last modified
  • JoshRoss

    As grandma told me, fast shutdown was when you just say, "ah, f* it." and pull the plug from the wall.

    -Josh

  • magicalclick

    @ManipUni:

    Another reason why I am glad I am a C9 member to know these beforehand. Because I would have never thought or even conclude such design on my own without expert telling me what really is going on.

    At least battery/power can be taken out. Like there is one time I really have to take out battery in WP7 to fix my problem, if I cannot cut the power, I would be screwed.

    Leaving WM on 5/2018 if no apps, no dedicated billboards where I drive, no Store name.
    Last modified
  • Sven Groot

    @cheong: Fast shutdown performs a normal, full logoff, shutting down all applications and services. Only the kernel is hibernated. As such, you get a normal logoff notification in your application.

    An interesting way to see the effect of this is the "systeminfo" command line application, which lists your system boot time. It now lists the last time your system performed a full kernel boot (which it would previously also have done if you always hibernated your system). For me that's presently August 19th, three days after installation. Smiley

Comments closed

Comments have been closed since this content was published more than 30 days ago, but if you'd like to continue the conversation, please create a new thread in our Forums, or Contact Us and let us know.