Coffeehouse Thread

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Craig Mundie - head of MSR and TwC resigns

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  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20857308

    Microsoft said Chief Research and Strategy Officer Craig Mundie, 63, plans to retire in 2014 after two decades at the software company and has shifted to a new role as a senior adviser to CEO Steve Ballmer.

    Eric Rudder, chief technical strategy officer, is taking over some of Mundie's duties overseeing research, privacy and security, as well as technology policy, Ballmer said in an email to staff Dec. 14 that Microsoft made public Monday.

    Mundie was responsible for Microsoft's early efforts in software for handheld organizers, cars and televisions. He also developed technology policy in areas such as privacy and security, and oversaw the Microsoft Research unit and the company's technology-policy relationships with governments such as China and Russia.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    Retirement and resignation aren't really the same thing, so your thread title is a tad misleading. Wink

  • User profile image
    Jim Young

    , Sven Groot wrote

    Retirement and resignation aren't really the same thing, so your thread title is a tad misleading. Wink

    Fer sure

  • User profile image
    felix9

    Eric Rudder, the man behind Technial Strategy and Incubation group ?

    HAL said:

    Eric's own interests will translate into somewhat different incubation priorities.

     The rise of TSI ?  Tongue Out Devil Devil Devil

  • User profile image
    davewill

    @Sven Groot: In his defense the BBC's write up of the Seattle Times write up was skewed.  Reads just like that game where one person tells another something who in turn passes it on to another, etc. ... in the end the original message is skewed.

  • User profile image
    Duncanma

    @davewill: seeing his age (63) made it seem so much more reasonable than some of the variations on this news I've seen. makes me wonder though, what is a reasonable age to retire now? I keep meeting or hearing of people retiring in their 50's and I think "what would you do with yourself?". Personally I don't want to stop doing work in some form until I'm no longer any good at it. So, more of a redefining of my "work" until it turn into retirement. what do you folks think? You are my peer group, so I'm really interested in your thoughts!

  • User profile image
    Bas

    @Duncanma: while I enjoy programming, I've never enjoyed doing it for a living, so personally I can't wait to stop doing it and retire. That would mean I'd be able to only work on stuff I actually enjoy, so that sounds amazing.

    Maybe I've just always worked in the wrong places, I don't know.

  • User profile image
    Dr Herbie

    @Bas: I'm the same -- I want to work on what I find interesting, not what other people pay me to do for them.  Had originally wanted to retire early, but that's not going to happen now. Sad

    Herbie

  • User profile image
    davewill

    @Duncanma: My brain can't fathom the economics and boredom of retirement that spans decades.  I really don't see another generation being able to afford a long retirement like our parent's generation.  I had always sensed from my father that he wouldn't retire just to retire.  However, not too long ago he decided to retire and quite frankly said it is because he is tired (unspoken ... of people's crap).  I never thought I'd hear those words.  So I'm working as long as I can.  How long that will be, who knows.

  • User profile image
    vesuvius

    @davewill: Remember that there are road builders, and plumbers, and factory workers, and car assemblers and so on.

    I know I don't want to be climbing on someones roof to replace their tiles at age 75, or stacking shelves at Tesco, risking falling at that age. If you work in a Bank you may want to continue on and on, but for a lot of people (that are the most physically strained due to their occupation) they cannot go on and on nor should they have to.

  • User profile image
    SteveRichter

    , evildictait​or wrote

    Eric Rudder, chief technical strategy officer, is taking over some of Mundie's duties overseeing research, privacy and security, as well as technology policy, ...

    Mundie was responsible for Microsoft's early efforts in software for handheld organizers, cars and televisions. ....

    Microsoft has made a huge mistake in missing the boat on the potential of mobile device computing. Mundie should have been gone a lot sooner and why promote Rudder when he was likely  right in the middle of Microsoft's big miss on this aspect of the business?  Even now Windows 8 phone is doing poorly because Microsoft does not have an OS available for every phone with a CPU.

     

  • User profile image
    davewill

    @vesuvius: Food, Shelter, Clothing.  Those determine whether I'm on a roof at 75 or not.

  • User profile image
    Proton2

    , davewill wrote

    @vesuvius: Food, Shelter, Clothing.  Those determine whether I'm on a roof at 75 or not.

     

    I've managed to go without buying new clothes for several years. I think I have enough sweaters to last me the rest of my life, unless I turn rather fat or rather skinny. But alas, I too plan to go up to my roof, at the age of 75, and threaten to jump off if the government refuses to fund my Armani suit fetish. #idlenomore Wink

  • User profile image
    Charles

    Retirement happens.

    C

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    , davewill wrote

    @vesuvius: Food, Shelter, Clothing.  Those determine whether I'm on a roof at 75 or not.

    And boredom. My dad is heading towards 80. He was a builder and a roofer all his life. He still does little roofing jobs for relatives, because, frankly, I don't think he'd know what to do if he had no work to do.

  • User profile image
    kettch

    @blowdart: Indeed. There's a lot of people who work their entire lives, retire, sit at home for a while, and die within a year because they didn't have anything to do.

  • User profile image
    warren

    On the other hand, it's good to retire a bit earlier because (hopefully) you've got a number of fairly healthy years left to go and see the world.  I imagine Mr. Mundie is pretty much set for life, so I hope that's what he does.  The world is too big and too amazing to miss out on it because you're obsessed with working.

  • User profile image
    Bas

    I never really understood the whole "I'd be bored if I had to sit at home all day" argument. I have roughly a thousand hobbies and time for roughly two hundred of them. If I didn't have to work I'd be able to spend the entire day doing all sorts of stuff I love that I don't get around to now because I have to work. So I wonder how people could get bored if they didn't have to work anymore. Also, what do people like these do with their weekends or vacations?

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