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February Headline: VB.NET enters top 10 for the first time

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  • User profile image
    DaveWill2

     

    It seems odd that it wouldn't be tracking VB.NET prior to 2010 yet have tracked C# since day one.  Anyone know or have any history on TIOBE?

     

    http://www.tiobe.com/index.php/content/paperinfo/tpci/index.html

  • User profile image
    Proton2

    I'll give this a try: from;

    http://www.colorado.edu/engineering/CAS/courses.d/IFEM.d/IFEM.Ch01.d/IFEM.Ch01.pdf

    Hasta la Vista, Fortran
    Most FEM books that include programming samples or even complete programs use Fortran. Those face an uncertain future. Since the mid-1990s, Fortran is gradually disappearing as a programming language taught in USA engineering undergraduate programs. (It still survives in Physics and Chemistry departments because of large amounts of legacy code.) So one end of the pipeline is drying up. Low-level scientific programming is moving to C and C++, mid-level to Java, Perl and Python, high-level to Matlab, Mathematica and their free-source Linux equivalents. How attractive can a book teaching in a dead language be?
    To support this argument with some numbers, here is a September-2003 snapshot of ongoing open source softwareprojectslistedinhttp://freshmeat.net. Thisconveystherelativeimportanceofvariouslanguages (a mixed bag of newcomers, going-strongs, have-beens and never-was) in the present environment.
    1–15
    Chapter 1: OVERVIEW 1–16
    Lang Projects Perc Lang Projects Perc Lang Projects Perc Ada 38 0.20% APL 3 0.02% ASP 25 0.13% Assembly 170 0.89% Awk 40 0.21% Basic 15 0.08% C 5447 28.55% C# 41 0.21% C++ 2443 12.80% Cold Fusion 10 0.05% Common Lisp 27 0.14% Delphi 49 0.26% Dylan 2 0.01% Eiffel 20 0.10% Emacs-Lisp 33 0.17% Erlang 11 0.06% Euler 1 0.01% Euphoria 2 0.01% Forth 15 0.08% Fortran 45 0.24% Haskell 28 0.15% Java 2332 12.22% JavaScript 236 1.24% Lisp 64 0.34% Logo 2 0.01% ML 26 0.14% Modula 7 0.04% Object Pascal 9 0.05% Objective C 131 0.69% Ocaml 20 0.10% Other 160 0.84% Other Scripting Engines 82 0.43% Pascal 38 0.20% Perl 2752 14.42% PHP 2020 10.59% Pike 3 0.02% PL/SQL 58 0.30% Pliant 1 0.01% PROGRESS 2 0.01% Prolog 8 0.04% Python 1171 6.14% Rexx 7 0.04% Ruby 127 0.67% Scheme 76 0.40% Simula 1 0.01% Smalltalk 20 0.10% SQL 294 1.54% Tcl 356 1.87% Unix Shell 550 2.88% Vis Basic 15 0.08% Xbasic 1 0.01% YACC 11 0.06% Zope 34 0.18% Total Projects: 19079

  • User profile image
    bondsbw

    I'm a bit surprised that Javascript hasn't been on the rise in the past few years.

  • User profile image
    fanbaby

    @bondsbw: In what universe?

    Maybe you guys and me travel very different roads, but on the road i am taking, the latest news is that github just published that it's working on an node.js/webkit extensible editor: atom.io. By invitation only and there's an ebay market for invitations :)

     

    No matter what's your language,  knowing JavaScript to a better than a beginner level is highly desirable today.

  • User profile image
    kettch

    , fanbaby wrote 

    No matter what's your language,  knowing JavaScript to a better than a beginner level is highly desirable today.

    Ignorance is bliss. The more I learn about JavaScript, the more I hate it.

  • User profile image
    bondsbw

    @fanbaby:  I'm talking about the link in DaveWill2's post.  Go down a bit and the chart shows practically no overall growth for JS for over a decade... unless I am misinterpreting what that chart is attempting to convey.

    And I agree with you... I expected to see a growth trend, but if anything it shows a slight downward trend since peaking around 2009-2010.

  • User profile image
    davewill

    @bondsbw: Could be the introduction of "apps" pulled away from web site usage (i.e. javascript).  The growth trend that you feel now might be reflected in future data.  Although I still come back to wondering how reliable and consistent the source data is.

    Regular readers know that the visual basic language is my preference thus why the headline caught my eye.  However, having never heard of this data source combined with seeing VB.NET not even tracked until September 2010 has me skeptical.  Paralleling a similar expectation of bondsbw in regards to javascript, it was my sense that in the 2002-2005 time frame VB.NET was the tip of the spear pushing .NET overall.

    I could have sworn VB.NET usage was higher than C# in the early days but can't recall where I read those stats so long ago.  So to not have tracked VB.NET but have tracked C# makes me wonder about bias in the data.

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    , kettch wrote

    *snip*

    Ignorance is bliss. The more I learn about JavaScript, the more I hate it.

    JavaScript is the VB of the 21st century. 

  • User profile image
    TheJoe

    , ScanIAm wrote

    *snip*

    JavaScript is the VB of the 21st century. 

    VB.NET or VB6?

  • User profile image
    cheong

    @kettch:I found working with a standard framework like jQuery a quite pleasent experience.

    Recent Achievement unlocked: Code Avenger Tier 4/6: You see dead program. A lot!
    Last modified
  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    , TheJoe wrote

    *snip*

    VB.NET or VB6?

    I'm probably going to hurt some feelings, here, but there is very little difference.  The languages themselves aren't the problem, it's the lack of structure in the culture around them that inspires shoddy code practices.  This ultimately results in craptastic apps that can are nearly impossible to rewrite, remove, or refactor.

    Yes, it's a generalization, but one that has been borne out by every single interaction I've had with 'professionally written' VB, VB.Net, or JavaScript.

     

     

  • User profile image
    davewill

    @ScanIAm: :)

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