, Visible = False wrote

*snip*

But isn't that a bonus that one gets with a high dpi display?

Sure, but the importance of higher resolution is being completely overblown. People seem to forget that the majority of 13" and 14" notebooks have 1366 x 768 displays, yet they act as if it's a deal breaker when it comes to a 10" tablet.

When it comes to scaling, it's always better to have more pixels than are needed as opposed to not enough.

Yes, but that's only the case when you're scaling down to a smaller size. In the case, of the iPad's pixel doubling, it's essentially scaling the size up. And IMHO, the 100% text size setting of Windows on an 11.6" 1366 x 768 in non-DPI scaled rendering is pretty much the right combination of readability and screen real estate that I'd need.

On the 1920 x 1080 Pro unit, I didn't bother to adjust the text settings back down to 100% from the 125% or 150% it was set at, but I reckon the text would have been too small to be comfortable to read, although it would have been cool to see the clarity of such tiny text on a screen that small. 

The Surface's display may be great for you, but there's no doubt it could be greater with a higher dpi display. Even the guys that worked on the Surface's display acknowledges that the lower res screen was used due to battery life and weight concerns; both of which Apple has had to deal with in the iPad 3.

At this small a screen size, I'd prefer better brightness and less glare, which are also factors in eye strain.

But at 15" or larger, yes, I won't settle for anything less than 1920 x 1080 resolution. Normally, I'd prefer 1920 x 1200, but that resolution is becoming rarer by the day.

The other day, I saw a 27" AIO from Dell with 2560 by 1440 display. At that size, I'd prefer even higher resolution, but they don't make those yet.