Coffeehouse Thread

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Heck, why not just canonize him?

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  • User profile image
    cbae

    LOL

  • User profile image
    Ray7

    The house is not being suggested as a historical landmark because Steve Jobs lived there (he lived in lots of places); it is being suggested as a landmark because the first Apple Computers were assembled in there. 

    Nothing unusual about it really. Here's another officially recognised historical landmark:

    Generic Forum Image

    The garage attached to the apartment rented by David and Lucile Packard. And why is it a landmark? Because the first Hewlett-Packard devices were made there – not because David Packard rented it.

  • User profile image
    Ray7

    Actually, the whole HP Museum deserves a link:

    http://www.hpmuseum.org/

    Fascinating stuff.

     

     

  • User profile image
    Ian2

    It should be - it is always difficult to see recent history as our successors will see it.  Pretty sure that Darwin's house has been preserved somewhere near hereabouts.  Not been to see it but happy that I have the option.  I would expect Bill Gates and Steve Wozniaks houses to get similar respect if they were the birthplace of (Q)DOS / early Apple devices?

  • User profile image
    Ray7
  • User profile image
    brian.​shapiro

    , Ray7 wrote

    @Ian2:

    Darwin's house. A national monument owned and maintained by English Heritage

    Generic Forum Image

    A much more interesting house. Its actually not uncommon at all for famous people's houses to be turned into museums. The funny thing about Steve Job's case though is that is house probably looks like all the other houses around it, and all the houses everywhere in every suburban neighborhood around the country. You wouldn't know the difference if someone lied and said the house down the street was Jobs, because they'd look the same. So... not sure the point.

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    , brian.​shapiro wrote

    *snip*

    A much more interesting house. Its actually not uncommon at all for famous people's houses to be turned into museums. The funny thing about Steve Job's case though is that is house probably looks like all the other houses around it, and all the houses everywhere in every suburban neighborhood around the country. You wouldn't know the difference if someone lied and said the house down the street was Jobs, because they'd look the same. So... not sure the point.

    The point is APPLE!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Seriously, though, Darwin's pad is beautiful.  It does seem to imply that science was a rich man's game back in the day.

  • User profile image
    brian.​shapiro

    , ScanIAm wrote

    Seriously, though, Darwin's pad is beautiful.  It does seem to imply that science was a rich man's game back in the day.

    Not necessarily. If you were wealthy, you were most likely to be able to pay for a university education, which was an asset. But that would also have included a lot of middle class individuals. And the case of Michael Faraday demonstrates how someone who was not well-off could succeed in a scientific career. His father was a blacksmith's apprentice and barely educated. Faraday himself became an apprentice to a bookbinder and bookseller, where he had a chance to read and develop his interest in science.

  • User profile image
    Ray7

    , brian.​shapiro wrote

    *snip*

    A much more interesting house. Its actually not uncommon at all for famous people's houses to be turned into museums. The funny thing about Steve Job's case though is that is house probably looks like all the other houses around it, and all the houses everywhere in every suburban neighborhood around the country. You wouldn't know the difference if someone lied and said the house down the street was Jobs, because they'd look the same. So... not sure the point.

    Well if the can make a garden shed a national monument then why not a bungalow? What they are is not as important as what happened there. 

  • User profile image
    jamie

    except that to steve jobs - it wasnt a bungalow... it was a "minimalist piece of suburban artwork

    an exception to the rule - an affront to the "man" and a statement about working class mentality - but... he was none of that. A megalomaniac, half hippy half businessman. bi-polar? The computer to free the world - oh ya - theres no extra slots, it runs on a baztard chip and good luck opening the case without special tools.

    gates was treated in a different light - but he was actually nicer - not as mean as said

    they both won...  

  • User profile image
    cbae

    , Ray7 wrote

    The house is not being suggested as a historical landmark because Steve Jobs lived there (he lived in lots of places); it is being suggested as a landmark because the first Apple Computers were assembled in there. 

    Nothing unusual about it really. Here's another officially recognised historical landmark:

    Generic Forum Image

    The garage attached to the apartment rented by David and Lucile Packard. And why is it a landmark? Because the first Hewlett-Packard devices were made there – not because David Packard rented it.

    That garage pictured above is designated a landmark because it's considered "The Birthplace of Silicon Valley". What kind of grandiose designation can you place on the former home Steve Jobs? "The Birthplace of the Personal Computer"? That would false. "The Birthplace of the First Successful Personal Computer"? That would be false too. "The Birthplace of the Apple I"? That's true, but it doesn't have quite the same significance of "The Birthplace of Silicon Valley", does it?

  • User profile image
    Jim Young

    I'll never forget the time I was in Santa Clara for a WINHEC conference in 1996. All the flags in the city were at half mast. I asked someone why this was so. The reply was "Dave Packard passed away". Now that's legacy.

  • User profile image
    Ray7

    , cbae wrote

    *snip*

    That garage pictured above is designated a landmark because it's considered "The Birthplace of Silicon Valley". What kind of grandiose designation can you place on the former home Steve Jobs? "The Birthplace of the Personal Computer"? That would false. "The Birthplace of the First Successful Personal Computer"? That would be false too. "The Birthplace of the Apple I"? That's true, but it doesn't have quite the same significance of "The Birthplace of Silicon Valley", does it?

    Well, the problem you have there is that no one said it had to be grandiose – just significant. 

  • User profile image
    Ray7

    , jamie wrote

    except that to steve jobs - it wasnt a bungalow... it was a "minimalist piece of suburban artwork

    an exception to the rule - an affront to the "man" and a statement about working class mentality - but... he was none of that. A megalomaniac, half hippy half businessman. bi-polar? The computer to free the world - oh ya - theres no extra slots, it runs on a baztard chip and good luck opening the case without special tools.

    gates was treated in a different light - but he was actually nicer - not as mean as said

    they both won...  

    Again, this isn't actually about Steve Jobs. 

  • User profile image
    cbae

    , Ray7 wrote

    *snip*

    Well, the problem you have there is that no one said it had to be grandiose – just significant. 

    That's generally why you recognize places as landmarks though. I'm all for taking a specimen Apple 1 and putting it right next to an Altair 8080 inside a museum  that's dedicated to computing history. But recognizing as a landmark a non-descript house where Wozniak assembled the first 50 units of a personal computer that essentially was a commercial failure is a little too much.

  • User profile image
    brian.​shapiro

    , Ray7 wrote

    *snip*

    Well if the can make a garden shed a national monument then why not a bungalow? What they are is not as important as what happened there. 

    I can't say why they decided to do that, but I'm sure it didn't hurt that the HP Garage was a short walking distance from a commercial area and a park, and not too far from Stanford University. I looked up the address for Jobs' home and its just in the middle of a huge suburban area, not close to anything as far as I can tell.

  • User profile image
    cbae

    @brian.shapiro: Wanna see something sick? Look at the home values around that area.

    http://www.zillow.com/homes/19621378_zpid/

    I see a 3 bedroom/1 bath 1073 square feet home that's valued at $1.3 million. Expressionless

    I've seen some homes in Los Altos Hills that look like mansions. I figured THOSE would be in the millions.

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    Now that he's moved on to another plane of existence, I suspect a new cult to pop up any day now.

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