Coffeehouse Thread

3 posts

Forum Read Only

This forum has been made read only by the site admins. No new threads or comments can be added.

How much money can I make writing a business application as a part-timer?

Back to Forum: Coffeehouse
  • User profile image
    pljprogramm​er

    I'm a part-time programmer.  I've done a few apps (about two years worth) involving ASP, Silverlight, ADO, WPF, WCF, and now I'm learning Azure.  I want to put my skills to use making money--but don't worry you professional coders, I'm not going to quit my day job (servicing technology--think contracts more than engineering).

    My question:  how much money per project can I make writing a business app on a part-time basis such as:  setting up a database, writing code using Silverlight or WPF or ASP (in that order of preference) and WCF some Linq-to-SQL queries in web services methods, in Visual Studio 2010 C#, secured by Forms Authentication, then troubleshooting the app with the client?  My best guess:  the typical client I will find (and I work alone) will be a mom-and-pop shop that cannot afford Oracle and/or a full-time professional ADO programmer.  This outfit probably has in mind more of a ASP web pages project, e.g., to place orders, but perhaps with a light database too.  I figure they can spend between $1k to $3k USD.  I notice a standard web ordering / light database package like Kartris starts at about $1k, so this might be my competition that puts a ceiling on this type project.  On the other hand, I might find some outfit that wants to do more than just place and track orders, such as employee management.

    Am I close with  my dollar range?  Anybody with experience in this area?  And where might I advertise?  I've checked out some online services such as http://www.freelancer.com/  Is this the best place for advertising your services?

    PJ

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Depends what you want to do.

    Places like GetAFreelancer and Guru are really for bargain-basement (and invariably of Indian origin) developers who are competing on price, not quality. You might find the occasional job posting that interests you and if you're lucky enough to win it you'll find yourself on a deadline which will interfere with your dayjob. So stuff like this is best suited to computer science students looking for holiday jobs, or developers who're in-between permanent positions.

    If you've got a product idea (as it looks like you do, with your web-based product) then you're better off developing it by yourself, and then releasing it when you think it's ready. Generating sales might be a problem, but that's all part of the fun of being an independent software house, yet you've still got your dayjob to fall back on.

    It helps to get into some really niche industry and develop solutions for them, that way you can hire sales people to directly pitch your product, rather than something general like what you're talking about, where there are more competitors.

  • User profile image
    CaRDiaK

    , pljprogramm​er wrote

    My best guess:  the typical client I will find (and I work alone) will be a mom-and-pop shop that cannot afford Oracle and/or a full-time professional ADO programmer.  This outfit probably has in mind more of a ASP web pages project, e.g., to place orders, but perhaps with a light database too.  I figure they can spend between $1k to $3k USD.  I notice a standard web ordering / light database package like Kartris starts at about $1k, so this might be my competition that puts a ceiling on this type project.  

    So why not make your own template driven package and sell it for example at $800 a pop with annual maintenance and hosting charges ontop of that. You can add additional users / sites at minimal outlay once you have the main template complete. This way you get paid early and you get a little extra coming in annually. 

    Write the employee management and sell it as an "add-on" Wink write other add-ons and see if people are interested in those also. 

    Go for it. You will only learn from the experience and right now, you have no time pressure and you can experiment with some cloud services.

    Advertise everywhere you can. On-line, locally, wherever. Referrals work wonders and each new customer you get provides a demo to another company or a referral. Its not always what you know but who you know. 

    Have fun with it dude Wink Best of luck. 

     

    We can only see a short distance ahead, but we can see plenty there that needs to be done.
    Last modified

Conversation locked

This conversation has been locked by the site admins. No new comments can be made.