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ISP header redirects of bing.com

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  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    Charter Cable out of Burbank, CA, seems to enjoy hijacking attempts to use bing.com

    It requires several trips to the search engine before Charter gives up foisting its own pathetic search page on screen.

    Shouldn't bing.com have recourse to this? Anyone else have ISP shennanighans like this?

    http://www.dslreports.com/forum/r25890552-Is-Charter-Hijacking-the-Bing-search-feature-in-IE-

     

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    there are a few things like this some of the cable guys try....  file a complaint with them and tell them you will just switch to a new isp.  in the end we have to vote with our $$$ if enough folks give the same  reason to cancel they will get it in time.

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    @figuerres: Most of us have very limited options when it comes to choosing an ISP, so the threat of leaving is hollow, and the ISP knows it.

  • User profile image
    Bass

    Verizon's DNS server sometimes does similar things in attempt to be "helpful". My suggestion is that you don't use your ISP's DNS server.

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    , wkempf wrote

    @figuerres: Most of us have very limited options when it comes to choosing an ISP, so the threat of leaving is hollow, and the ISP knows it.

     

    I guess I am lucky as I have options where I live.

    why do folks allow one isp to be the only one in a given location ??

    Who is John Galt?

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    It's government sponsored monopolies. Wink

    Local city governments control what cable companies are in particular neighborhoods. If you're lucky, there will be two choices, but I know neighborhoods where there's literally a single option. You might say, aha! Two choices means you can switch and do have some power here. That's false, as when there's only two options what happens is the two wind up behaving identically when it comes to things like this. There's just not enough competition to give real choice here.

    Of course, there's smaller ISPs often available, but being smaller they are usually not services that can really compete with the others. This means the big corporations and the government can all claim there's no monopoly, while the end result for consumers is that there might as well be. Where I live, I have exactly two real choices (AT&T Uverse and Comcast), one pseudo choice (Dish Network) and one or two mom-n-pop non-choices. Because of the realistic two-choice situation, AT&T and Comcast both do draconian anti-consumer stuff all of the time, with no worries that they'll lose any customers. Sure, some might protest and switch, but roughly the same number will do the same to their competitor, making it a wash.

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    , wkempf wrote

    It's government sponsored monopolies. Wink

    Local city governments control what cable companies are in particular neighborhoods. If you're lucky, there will be two choices, but I know neighborhoods where there's literally a single option. You might say, aha! Two choices means you can switch and do have some power here. That's false, as when there's only two options what happens is the two wind up behaving identically when it comes to things like this. There's just not enough competition to give real choice here.

    Of course, there's smaller ISPs often available, but being smaller they are usually not services that can really compete with the others. This means the big corporations and the government can all claim there's no monopoly, while the end result for consumers is that there might as well be. Where I live, I have exactly two real choices (AT&T Uverse and Comcast), one pseudo choice (Dish Network) and one or two mom-n-pop non-choices. Because of the realistic two-choice situation, AT&T and Comcast both do draconian anti-consumer stuff all of the time, with no worries that they'll lose any customers. Sure, some might protest and switch, but roughly the same number will do the same to their competitor, making it a wash.

    the movie was a fail  but the more I see the more I think about the meme

    "who is John Galt?"

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    Actually Raymond Chen did a blog post on this just a couple of weeks ago:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2013/01/29/10388983.aspx

  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    , evildictait​or wrote

    Actually Raymond Chen did a blog post on this just a couple of weeks ago:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2013/01/29/10388983.aspx

    Disgusting.

    Packrats leave better crap after stealing my stuff.

  • User profile image
    davewill

    @JohnAskew: Curious.  Went looking for alternative DNS under such a scenario and ran across http://pcsupport.about.com/od/tipstricks/a/free-public-dns-servers.htm stating the following Level 3 Communications DNS addresses.  According to the note queries to those addresses automatically route to the nearest DNS.  How would you see and verify that?  How would those nearest addreses be uncovered so they could be used directly?

    Level31209.244.0.3209.244.0.4
  • User profile image
    GoddersUK

    @JohnAskew: Surely this isn't legal. If my ISP tried that I'd seek restitution, either through the courts or by taking one of my patent magnetised steel hacking axes to the hard drives of their server.

    (Actually I wouldn't put this past my ISP, since they've just been bought out by a company owned and run by everyone's favourite Australian...)

  • User profile image
    evildictait​or

    , GoddersUK wrote

    @JohnAskew: Surely this isn't legal. If my ISP tried that I'd seek restitution, either through the courts or by taking one of my patent magnetised steel hacking axes to the hard drives of their server.

    (Actually I wouldn't put this past my ISP, since they've just been bought out by a company owned and run by everyone's favourite Australian...)

    It's legal because you signed an agreement with your ISP that allows them to do as they please. There is no law that requires an ISP to return a non-spoofed response (and if there was, most hotel wifis and corporate login firewalls would be illegal too).

    If you use google, you can always use the encrypted SSL version (bing doesn't support encrypted search Sad)- if your ISP can factor Google's public RSA key, they frankly deserve to put adverts all over the Google homepage Smiley

  • User profile image
    Bass

    I think Microsoft could sue for trademark infringement at the least. There has to be something illegal about doing business under someone else's trademark. Heh.

  • User profile image
    DaveWill2

    , davewill wrote

    @JohnAskew: Curious.  Went looking for alternative DNS under such a scenario and ran across http://pcsupport.about.com/od/tipstricks/a/free-public-dns-servers.htm stating the following Level 3 Communications DNS addresses.  According to the note queries to those addresses automatically route to the nearest DNS.  How would you see and verify that?  How would those nearest addreses be uncovered so they could be used directly?

    Level31209.244.0.3209.244.0.4

    the brain just needed a break. sysinternals tcpmon or procmon.

  • User profile image
    GoddersUK

    @evildictaitor: I can see lots of potential legal avenues (obviously I'm thinking from a UK perspective here, but I'm sure there will be equivalent laws in most jurisdictions):

    • Trade descriptions - they are advertising internet access, but providing only limited access to the internet
    • The contract - does it actually allow them to do this? (I don't recall seeing a clause in mine that said "we may, from time to time, redirect your visits to a functioning website to another one without your consent or knowledge for teh lols"
    • Communications interceptions - the Royal Mail aren't allowed to arbitrarily redirect my letters; BT aren't allowed to arbitrarily redirect my phone calls
    • Fraud - by returning a page that's not Bing when I visit Bing it could be alleged that they are trying to fraudulently pass themselves off as Bing (perhaps even if they're not explicitly branding as such)
  • User profile image
    fanbaby

    Use Google's servers 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 DISCLOSURE: they read you data

  • User profile image
    Jim Young

    Charter is my ISP and this has never happened to me. But I also have my own DNS server at home.

  • User profile image
    Craig_​Matthews

    , Jim Young wrote

    Charter is my ISP and this has never happened to me. But I also have my own DNS server at home.

    Then of course it's never happened to you.

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